1 injured in New Orleans' Caesars Superdome roof fire

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CNN 21 September, 2021 - 03:52pm 33 views

Did the Superdome catch fire?

Caesars Superdome, the home of the New Orleans Saints, caught fire on Tuesday afternoon. ... The New Orleans Fire Department responded to the three-alarm fire at the Superdome shortly after images of the scene hit the internet. According to NOLA.com, one person was taken to a nearby hospital for minor burns. CBSSports.comCaesars Superdome roof catches fire less than two weeks before Saints' home opener

Updated 4:52 PM ET, Tue September 21, 2021

CNN's Theresa Waldrop contributed to this report.

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Caesars Superdome fire started in 'gutter tub'

WWLTV 21 September, 2021 - 08:01pm

Scene outside Caesars Superdome after roof catches fire

NOLA.com 21 September, 2021 - 08:01pm

Scene outside Caesars Superdome after roof catches fire

WDSU News 21 September, 2021 - 08:01pm

Saints' stadium catches fire as team remains displaced following Hurricane Ida; 1 person injured

Fox News 21 September, 2021 - 01:48pm

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The New Orleans Fire Department responded to a three-alarm fire at the Caesars Superdome in downtown New Orleans just after noon on Tuesday as heavy smoke and flames appeared to emerge from the stadium roof.

According to the report, the fire blazed through the roof for around 15 minutes before the smoke seemed to lessen, indicating it had been extinguished. At least one person was transported to an area hospital with minor burns. 

The New Orleans Fire Department did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment. 

The Saints have been displaced since Aug. 28 when Hurricane Ida battered the Louisiana coast. The team has been practicing in the Dallas area and played their first "home" game at TIAA Bank Field in Jacksonville, Florida.

Paulina Dedaj is a Digital Reporter for Fox News and Fox Business. Follow Paulina Dedaj on Twitter at @PaulinaDedaj. If you've got a tip, you can email Paulina at Paulina.Dedaj@fox.com

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One injured as Superdome roof catches on fire

WWLTV 21 September, 2021 - 01:30pm

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NEW ORLEANS -- Smoke and flames shot up the side of the Superdome's roof on Tuesday after a pressure washer being used to clean the roof of the New Orleans sports and entertainment arena caught fire.

The New Orleans Fire Department confirmed firefighters responded to flames on the building's roof shortly after 12:30 p.m. The fire appeared to be under control a short time later.

New Orleans Emergency Management Services said on Twitter that they were transporting one person to the hospital for "minor burns." Emergency officials called on people to stay away from the area.

Crews were power washing the roof this week to prepare it to be painted, officials said.

"Upon further investigation it appears that a pressure washer being used to clean the roof caught fire. Damage is still being assessed," said a statement from the Louisiana Stadium and Expedition District, which is a state board that governs the dome, and ASM Global, which manages the Superdome.

"The fire was contained to the exterior gutter system surrounding (the) Superdome, and only a small area of the roof suffered minimal damage. Pressure washing was underway to clean the roof before a planned re-coating of the entire roof itself. Any fire damage will be addressed during the re-coating process," the management companies said.

"Initial assessments suggest that damage is superficial and there appears to be no structural damage or impact to the integrity of the roof's exterior skin. The building's outer skin and roof remain watertight."

A photo posted on the city's emergency management Twitter feed showed firefighters in the trench that separates the Superdome roof from an outer wall as they sprayed down the fire-blackened walls.

The NFL's New Orleans Saints have regularly played home games at the venue, often drawing capacity crowds. The Superdome also has been the site of seven Super Bowls in recent decades, and is also used for concerts, college football and other events.

The next Saints home game at the Superdome is scheduled for Oct. 3 when the team faces the New York Giants.

"While final assessments continue, the Louisiana Stadium and Exposition District along with the Superdome's management company, ASM Global, do not feel the fire will impact or force any cancellation of future events," including the Saints' game, the management companies said.

The team's final preseason home game slated for Aug. 28 was canceled due to impending Hurricane Ida, which made landfall the next day. Since the storm, the team has been practicing in the Dallas area. The team's Sept. 12 game against the Green Bay Packers was moved to Jacksonville, Florida, out of concerns for the city's wider infrastructure and Dome staff although the Dome itself was not damaged during Ida.

In 2005, the Superdome was used as a shelter of last resort for those unable to evacuate the city before Hurricane Katrina struck. The building housed up to 30,000 people seeking shelter but it didn't withstand the storm's impact. Winds tore a hole in its roof, sending water onto the dome's field. The building was operating on generators, which only powered the lights. Levees protecting the city had failed, sending tons of water throughout the city. Pumping stations couldn't keep up and as a result, up to 6 feet (2 meters) of water surrounded the dome.

BREAKING: Massive fire breaks at New Orleans' Superdome stadium

Daily Mail 21 September, 2021 - 01:02pm

By Dailymail.com Reporter

A massive fire broke out on the roof of New Orleans' Superdome stadium, injuring at least one person. 

Early reports said the fire broke out while the roof was being water pressured in preparation to be painted.  The stadium is undergoing reparations and renovations that were interrupted when Hurricane Ida hit. 

On Tuesday afternoon, thick plumes of smoke and flames could be seen rising from the stadium's roof.  

At least eight fire trucks responded to the emergency and fire crews were seen battling the blaze at around 1pm.

One person was treated for 'minor burns' by paramedics and was taken to University Medical Center, said New Orleans Emergency Medical Services. 

A massive fire has broken out on the roof of New Orleans' Superdome Stadium. On Tuesday afternoon, thick plumes of smoke and flames could be seen rising from the stadium's roof

This photo provided by NOLA shows firefighters putting out a fire on the roof of New Orleans' Superdome on Tuesday

The New Orleans Fire Department said it was responding to the two-alarm fire shortly after 1pm. It's not clear if anyone has been injured

Dough Thornton, VP of stadiums for the company that manages the superdome reportedly told FOX that the fire had started 'in the gutter tub' on the roof

It's not yet clear what the cause of the fire was, but NOLA.com reported that crews had been power washing the 10-acre roof to prepare it to be painted

Around 1pm, the roof caught fire and smoke became visible throughout the city.

Thick plumes of smoke and flames could be seen rising from the stadium's roof. At least eight fire trucks responded to the emergency

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 The Superdome has been the home to some of biggest events in sports including seven Super Bowls. Its designers envisioned a domed stadium that could bring a football team to the area

After reaching an agreement to build a stadium, the NFL awarded the area a team, the New Orleans Saints. Construction began in August 1971 and was completed in August 1975

During the summer of 1996, the Superdome underwent a $22.8 million renovation project that included a new entrance lobby and ticket offices, an additional concourse serving the upper level seats, refurbished ballrooms, additional accommodations for the disabled and upgraded safety and security equipment  

Around 12.30pm, the roof caught fire and smoke became visible throughout the city. By 1.30pm employees were allowed to re-enter the building. 

Flames and smoke could no longer be seen emitting from the Superdome by 1.30pm.

Officials confirmed that the fire did not appear to be a major incident and the stadium is not burning anymore. 

A worker who was in the stadium when the fire broke out says he didn't realize the roof was on fire until he was ordered toe evacuate. 

'I got calls from my friends telling me it was on fire,' the unnamed worker told NOLA.com

Another employee, Jason Hurst, told the outlet that the flames were about six to ten feet high. 

Hurst was inside the dome doing sign installation. 

Dough Thornton, VP of stadiums for the company that manages the superdome reportedly told FOX that the fire had started 'in the gutter tub' on the roof while workers were pressure washing the 10-acre roof to prepare it to be painted. Thornton said the fire is under control. 

The stadium, which is located in the city's central business district and which was officially opened in 1975, is home to the New Orleans Saints. The team are playing away this weekend because of landfall from Hurricane Ida about three weeks ago, and are set to have their next home game on October 3.  

When Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, the Superdome sustained $185.4million in damage and served as shelter for more than 30,000 people affected.   

The Caesars Superdome is not only an icon of New Orleans' skyline and football legacy, but also a symbol of city officials' negligence and the residents' resilience. 

In August 2005, when Hurricane Katrina hit, tens of thousands of New Orleanians faced unimaginable challenges having lost their homes and access to basic necessities. At the time, more than 30,000 found in the Superdome a temporary shelter while they prepared to recover from the flooding.  

The stadium was nowhere near prepared to shelter people seeking refuge. City officials had refused to stockpile the dome with food and emergency supplies because they wanted residents to leave the city altogether as the dome was 'not a hotel.'  

Mayor Ray Nagin made a last minute, desperate call to Doug Thornton, who to this day has been in charge of managing the superdome, so its doors could be opened to receive evacuees. But it was too late, most of the staff had already left the city seeking refuge from Katrina. 

When the stranded victims of the disaster found themselves in urgent need of somewhere to go, about 500 National Guard troops, 18 management staff, a couple of hundred other employees and Thornton dealt with the situation the best they could.

Evacuees sheltered in the wreckage and desolation left behind in the structure that had hosted exhilarated fans just weeks before. 

Many found themselves in complete darkness when the dome's emergency generator failed. This also meant that the refrigeration system that was keeping the food from spoiling wasn't operating. When medical machines failed, some with medical conditions had to be transferred to hospitals. The ones who didn't find space in the trucks to be transported had to stay in the dome. 

Stranded victims of Hurricane Katrina rest inside the Superdome September 2, 2005 in New Orleans

US Navy handout picture dated 05 September 2005, shows US Army National Guard members leaving the New Orleans Superdome to patrol the streets in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

The stadium was built to withstand most natural disasters, but it was not spared of damage from Katrina. Katrina sheared away a big part of the roof's covering, with water leaking inside the stadium. 

About 80 percent of the roof was damaged, with sunlight filtering through the holes and rain pouring inside. 

Nagin received backlash for the poor preparation ahead of Katrina at the Superdome. When government agencies failed Katrina victims, they found in the Superdome a shelter of last resort, but it soon became a hellhole. 

As temperature rose to the 90s with no air conditioning and food rotting, outraged victims smeared the walls of the stadium with feces and blood. Desperate mothers secured how little formula they could find for their babies, and were told to scrap off diapers and reuse them because there was no supply. 

Thornton redacted a two -page handwritten list with all the supplies they needed and sent it to the city. Nothing arrived.  FEMA had promised 360,000 military rations, only 40,000 arrived the first day. 

Two elderlies died because of pre-existing illnesses, one person had an overdose and a man killed himself by jumping from the upper level seats. Two, including a child, were raped as they took refuge in the stadium, The Seattle Times reported. 

When the situation became unmanageable, evacuees were taken to the Astrodome in Houston and to San Antonio.   

The Superdome sustained $185.4 million in damage. The New Orleans Saints played their 2005 home games in San Antonio at the Alamodome and in Baton Rouge at Tiger Stadium. 

When work began in January to clean up and renovate the Superdome, more than 4,000 tons of trash and debris were removed, along with 1.6 million square feet of wrecked carpeting, 650,000 square feet of wall board and 500,000 square feet of ceiling tiles. All 72,000 seats were cleaned and crews repaired the roof.  

Katrina was not the first time the dome was used as a public shelter. Before 2005, the stadium had housed evacuees in 1998 during Hurricane Georges and in 2004 during Hurricane Ivan. 

People walk through high water in front of the Superdome August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana

The Superdome, where thousands of people stayed while waiting to be evacuated after Hurricane Katrina hit, is seen September 11, 2005 in downtown New Orleans, Louisiana

Workers begin the job or repairing the roof of the Louisiana Superdome Saturday Oct. 15, 2005 in New Orleans

Source: Stadiums of Pro Football  

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