2021 British Open odds, picks: Brooks Koepka, Jordan Spieth predictions from top model that called Rahm's win

Sports

CBS Sports 14 July, 2021 - 07:42pm 24 views

Where is the British Open 2021?

The 2021 British Open will return to Royal St George's golf course for the first time since 2011. The course is located in Sandwich, England and has hosted The Open Championship 14 times. Sporting NewsBritish Open 2021 tee times, TV coverage, live stream & more to watch Thursday's Round 1

Who wins the Open 2021?

Odds, betting favorites, expert picks & more to know. Jon Rahm finally delivered in a major tournament and won the 2021 U.S. Open. Can he win his second just a month later at the 2021 British Open? The Open Championship is returning after the COVID-19 pandemic canceled the event in 2020. Sporting NewsWho will win the British Open in 2021? Odds, betting favorites, expert picks & more to know

When was the last Open at Royal St Georges?

BRENTLEY ROMINE: The last time The Open was played at Royal St. George's, Darren Clarke won at 5 under. However, that year there was some nasty weather on Saturday. Golf ChannelPunch Shot: Who will win The Open at Royal St. George's – and who won't

One of the biggest questions heading into the 2021 Open Championship is whether Bryson DeChambeau's game can translate to links golf. DeChambeau has won two PGA Tour events already this season and is ranked No. 1 in driving distance (321.9) and strokes gained off the tee (1.130). However, DeChambeau has struggled mightily at the Open Championship throughout his career, missing the cut in 2019 and finishing 51st in 2018.

Despite those results, DeChambeau is expected to be among the top Open Championship 2021 contenders this week when play gets underway from Royal St. George's Golf Club in England. The 2021 Open Championship odds from William Hill Sportsbook list DeChambeau at 14-1, while Dustin Johnson, the No. 1 ranked player in the world, is going off at 15-1. Jon Rahm enters Thursday's 2021 Open Championship tee times for Round 1 as the 7-1 favorite. Before locking in your 2021 Open Championship picks, be sure to see the latest golf predictions and projected leaderboard from the proven computer model at SportsLine.

SportsLine's proprietary model, built by DFS pro Mike McClure, has been red-hot since the PGA Tour resumed last June. In fact, it's up over $8,000 on its best bets since the restart, nailing tournament after tournament.

At the 2021 U.S. Open, McClure's model was all over Jon Rahm's first career major championship victory at 10-1 from the start. Rahm was two strokes off the lead heading into the weekend, but the model still projected him as the winner at that point. The result: Rahm birdied the 17th and 18th holes in dramatic fashion to send his backers straight to the pay window. At the 2021 Masters, McClure nailed Rahm's (+250) top-five finish in his best bets, as well as Corey Conners' (+550) top-10 showing. McClure's best bets netted over $450 at the Masters.

In addition, McClure was all over Daniel Berger's win at +1400 in his best bets at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in February. McClure also nailed Viktor Hovland's (+2500) victory in the Mayakoba Golf Classic in December. That was one of many huge calls he's made in the past several months.

This same model has also nailed a whopping seven majors entering the weekend. Anyone who has followed it has seen massive returns.

Now that the 2021 Open Championship field is set, SportsLine simulated the event 10,000 times, and the results were surprising. Head to SportsLine now to see the projected 2021 Open Championship leaderboard.

One huge shocker the model is calling for at the Open Championship 2021: Brooks Koepka, a four-time major champion and one of the top favorites, struggles mightily doesn't even crack the top 10. Koepka saves his best golf for major championships, and he's finished seventh or better in three of his last four major starts. However, Koepka has finished 39th or worse in three of his last six starts at the Open Championship and ranks 165th in driving accuracy percentage (55.84), which could spell trouble at Royal St George's Golf Club.

On the other hand, the model has taken into account that Jordan Spieth will enter the Open Championship 2021 full of confidence. Spieth has seen an incredible resurgence in recent weeks, recording his 12th career victory at the Valero Texas Open and finishing inside the top 10 in five of his last eight starts overall. He's also had success at the Open Championship in his career, finishing on top of the leaderboard in 2017 and recording a ninth-place finish in 2018. 

The proven model also is factoring in that Justin Thomas has all the tools needed to win the Claret Jug. Thomas will enter the Open Championship 2021 confident he can secure his second major title. He finished 11th at the Open in 2019 and secured a top-10 finish last week at the Scottish Open. Thomas' uncanny ability to shape his iron shots will go a long way this week at Royal St. George's. The 28-year-old currently ranks fifth on tour in strokes gained approaching the green (.853) and 10th in total strokes gained (1.503). He's also been sensational with his putter this season, ranking fourth in putting average (1.715) and sixth in one-putt percentage (42.97).

Among the options the model is touting is a long shot who comes in at well over 35-1 Open Championship odds 2021. Pure ball-strikers who can putt well excel at the Open, and this player fits the bill. Anyone who backs this underdog could cash in huge. You can only see who it is here.

Enter Golf Props to take your shot at the $50,000 jackpot. It's 100% free to play.

© 2004-2021 CBS Interactive. All Rights Reserved.

CBS Sports is a registered trademark of CBS Broadcasting Inc. Commissioner.com is a registered trademark of CBS Interactive Inc.

Images by Getty Images and US Presswire

Read full article at CBS Sports

2021 British Open predictions, picks, favorites: One of these nine will win at Royal St. George's

CBS Sports 14 July, 2021 - 06:35pm

It's almost time for the 149th Open Championship, which means it's almost time to crown another major champion -- the last of 2021. This event has seen some great ones in the last decade with Ernie Els, Rory McIlroy, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson and Jordan Spieth among those who have brought home the Claret Jug.

Who will join that list? Recent history says we get a more experienced champion here than at the three other majors. In the last decade, only Spieth and McIlroy have won this tournament at an age younger than 30.

There are plenty of contenders in their 20s who could join them, but I skewed my pool of candidates slightly older this time around. Here's the usual list of suspects with maybe a few surprises tossed in as we try and figure out who's going to win the last major of 2021.

Enter Golf Props to take your shot at the $50,000 jackpot. It's 100% free to play.

© 2004-2021 CBS Interactive. All Rights Reserved.

CBS Sports is a registered trademark of CBS Broadcasting Inc. Commissioner.com is a registered trademark of CBS Interactive Inc.

Images by Getty Images and US Presswire

Westwood, still without a major, reaches unwanted milestone

Bradford Era 14 July, 2021 - 06:35pm

A few passing clouds, otherwise generally clear. Low 62F. Winds light and variable..

A few passing clouds, otherwise generally clear. Low 62F. Winds light and variable.

SANDWICH, England (AP) — The unwanted milestone Lee Westwood has been creeping toward is finally here.

The British Open at Royal St. George’s will be Westwood’s 88th major championship, and no other player has competed in that many without winning one.

“That’s nice, that record,” he said Wednesday. “It shows I’ve been a good player for a long, long time.”

So, it was put to Westwood, a former top-ranked player, a 27-time winner across the European and PGA Tours, and the reigning three-time European No. 1: How does it feel to be described as the best player never to win a major?

“Another accolade,” he said, in a matter-of-fact way. “Yeah, I love it.”

Glib? Maybe. Sarcastic? For sure. He’s long mastered that.

Yet there might be a hint of truth behind it all, highlighting the mental toughness and thick skin the 48-year-old Englishman has had to develop over the years after so many heartaches on golf’s biggest stage.

After all, he has been in the top 10 on 19 occasions in majors and, more pertinently, has nine top-three finishes — eight of them coming in a five-year period (2008-13) during which he became world No. 1.

Yet still Westwood comes back for more. And, make no mistake, he’s still in the conversation for the title, even approaching 50.

“I think when you get to our age,” he said, “we maybe don’t treat it as seriously as we once did, and it’s easy to play golf when you’re a little bit more flippant about it and see it for what it is — getting a small ball in a small hole.”

That almost carefree approach is serving him well. In December, he finished the 2020 season as the Race to Dubai champion — formerly known as the winner of the Order of Merit — for the third time in his career and 20 years after the first. His victory in Abu Dhabi last year ensured he is the only active golfer to win titles in four separate decades.

More recently, there were the back-to-back runner-up finishes — both by one stroke — at Bay Hill and The Players Championship on the PGA Tour in March.

A self-declared “working-class lad,” Westwood puts his ability to stay relevant at the top end of golf — he is ranked No. 29 — on staying fit, having other interests in his life like horse racing and skiing, and having a better perspective. He also got married last month for a second time, to Helen Storey, who often works as his caddie and is on the bag this week.

He said the thing that lets him down is an inability to maintain intensity week in, week out. But he knows that just comes with age.

“When the intensity is there and my game is there, mentally I think I’m stronger,” Westwood said. “Probably putt a little bit better now than I did 10 years ago. Short game is definitely better. Tee to green, probably not quite as good, but good enough.”

Westwood has missed the cut in his two appearances at Royal St. George’s but that doesn’t bother him. After all, he did the same at Muirfield in 2002, only to finish third there in 2013 when he went into the final round in the lead.

Just one of those many near-misses, which have led to him overtaking Jay Haas as the man to have played in the most majors without a win.

Provided, of course, Westwood doesn’t win this week.

“It’s a lottery,” he said. “Links golf is even more of a lottery than your week-in, week-out golf where the conditions are even more predictable. You can’t kind of overanalyze it, I don’t think.”

More AP golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports

Steve Douglas is at https://twitter.com/sdouglas80

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Please help local businesses by taking an online survey to help us navigate through these unprecedented times. None of the responses will be shared or used for any other purpose except to better serve our community. The survey is at: www.pulsepoll.com $1,000 is being awarded. Everyone completing the survey will be able to enter a contest to Win as our way of saying, "Thank You" for your time. Thank You!

Success! An email has been sent to with a link to confirm list signup.

Error! There was an error processing your request.

Would you like to receive our ads to go? Sign Up Today!

Would you like to receive our breaking news? Sign Up Today!

Would you like to receive notice about our circulation promotions and contests?  Sign Up Today!

Would you like to receive our daily news? Sign Up Today!

Would you like to receive our lifestyle headlines about food and wine, Bradford area living, local history and more? Sign Up Today!

Would you like to receive our Latest Obituary Notices? Signup today!

Would you like to receive our sports news? Sign Up Today!

Includes our e-Edition at no extra cost!

How to watch The Open 2021 golf – TV channel, live stream, schedule

Radio Times 14 July, 2021 - 06:30pm

By Michael Potts

The Open Championship golf returns to our TV screens in 2021 with some of the world’s finest players eager to etch their name in to the history books.

Last year’s tournament suffered a cancellation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, meaning players will be determined to get back out there on the course in 2021 and make every moment count.

The field of 156 players will gather in the UK for a four-day feast of golf drama, with the usual suspects in hot contention to add more silverware to their brimming trophy cabinets.

Jon Rahm heads into this one in a rich vein of form following his triumph at the US Open in June.

The Spanish star face stern competition from a typically stubborn field that includes former champions Rory McIlroy, Francesco Molinari, Phil Mickelson, Jordan Speith and the last man to win at The Open Championship, 2019 victor Shane Lowry.

RadioTimes.com brings you everything you need to know about The Open 2021 including how to watch on TV and live stream across Sky Sports, plus all the times.

The Open takes place between Thursday 15th July 2021 and Sunday 18th July 2021.

The tournament was cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It was the first time since World War II that the event had not gone ahead.

Updates from the world of sport on TV, including news, views and how to watch it all live.

Thanks, you are now signed up to our sport on TV newsletter! We look forward to sending you our email updates.

Sign in to/ register for a RadioTimes.com account to manage your email preferences

Immediate Media Company Limited (publishers of radiotimes.com) would love to send you our sports on TV newsletters. We may also send occasional updates from our editorial team. You can unsubscribe at any time. For more information about how we hold your personal data, please see our privacy policy.

You can watch the tournament live on Sky Sports Golf and Main Event or online via the Sky Go app.

You can add individual channels such as Sky Sports Golf for just £18 per month combined or pick up the complete sports package for just £25 per month.

Sky Sports Golf / Main Event from 6:30am

Sky Sports Golf / Main Event from 6:30am

Sky Sports Golf / Main Event from 9am

Sky Sports Golf / Main Event from 8am

The Open will be held at Royal St. George’s Golf Club in Sandwich, UK this year.

Players from around the world will jet across to the east coast of Kent to do battle for the prestigious title revered by golf superstars across the PGA and European Tours.

Nobody. The Open was cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic taking hold of the globe but the 2019 tournament produced plenty of fireworks as Shane Lowry triumphed at Royal Portrush.

The Irishman struck a magnificent 15 under par score to crush the contenders around him with a six-shot margin of victory.

Englishman Tommy Fleetwood finished runner-up with a nine-under score, while US stars Tony Finau and Brooks Koepka followed up with seven-under and six-under respectively. Lee Westwood levelled Koepka’s score to round off the top five.

Try 12 issues for £1 today - never miss an issue

Eight lucky readers will each win four tickets to see their choice of either Horrible Histories – Terrible Thames, David Walliams’ Billionaire Boy or Horrible Histories – Barmy Britain Part Five!

Get your gears turning with hundreds of puzzles, with new ones added each week - and enjoy a seven day free trial!

Sign up to receive our newsletter!

Thanks! You're now subscribed to our newsletter.

Already have an account with us? Sign in to manage your newsletter preferences

By entering your details, you are agreeing to Radio Times privacy policy. You can unsubscribe at any time.

British Open is back, along with the quirks of links golf

GazetteNET 14 July, 2021 - 05:52pm

SANDWICH, England — Danny Willett shrugged his shoulders, grabbed his tee, and returned to his caddie beside the fourth tee at Royal St. George’s.

He’d just hit what he thought was the ideal drive during his final practice round at the British Open, only for one of the bumps on the course’s lunar-like landscape to throw it offline and into the rough.

“Kicked left,” Willett said, before smiling. “Never asked for it!”

Expect the unexpected will be the motto for the world’s best golfers this week as they get a crack at links golf for the first time in two years in this picturesque corner of southeast England.

In some respects, this British Open will feel as though golf has returned to normal. There will be some 30,000 fans roaming the Sandwich links daily from Thursday, the biggest golf crowd at a major since the pandemic. One man was wearing a dragon onesie next to the ropes on the sixth hole Wednesday, having been cruelly fooled by a group of friends into wearing a costume.

Those ooohs and aaahs and rumbling roars from a distance are all part of Open lore, and they’ll return. How golf missed them last year, when its oldest championship was canceled for the first time since 1945 because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“Big-time sporting events need big-time crowds,” R&A chief executive Martin Slumbers said.

Then again, this week couldn’t be more different. Players are being kept in a strict bubble to comply with COVID-19 restrictions devised by the R&A and are at risk of disqualification for breaching rules.

“It’s probably inevitable that we will have some problems,” said Slumbers, who has already seen Masters champion Hideki Matsuyama and Zach Johnson, the 2015 British Open champion, withdraw after testing positive for the virus and Bubba Watson forced to pull out for being a close contact of a positive case.

During a practice round on Monday, Phil Mickelson appeared concerned he was getting too close to spectators. “He was like, ‘Can you just give me some space, I don’t know who you are,’” said English qualifier Nick Poppleton, who played alongside Mickelson.

On Wednesday, a spectator threw a ball to Mickelson for him to sign. The PGA champion immediately threw it back, without signing it, and wiped his hands with a towel.

And then there’s the course at Royal St. George’s, disrespected by some and unloved by many more for being unfair. Balls can be propelled almost sideways by the undulations on the fairways, some of which can be unhittable especially in dry and fast conditions.

The fairways on the first and 17th holes promise to be particularly tough, not to mention the one on the fourth, as Willett can attest.

“It’s not my favorite of the (Open) rotation,” Brooks Koepka said of a course once described to American golfer Charles Howell III as “the world’s largest pinball machine.”

Helping the players this week is the rain that has lashed down on the course — the southernmost of the 10 on the rotation — which has made it green and soft. On the 17th hole Wednesday, a drive by Garrick Higgo plopped up upon landing on a side-slope, taking the pace out of the ball as it dribbled toward the semi rough. Some fairways also have been widened.

Against that, the rough is knee high in places and is thick and lush rather than wispy.

“There’s certain lies out there it’s going to be a pitch back to the fairway,” big-hitting Bryson DeChambeau said of rough he described Tuesday as “diabolical.”

Lee Westwood said he’d been informed by Slumbers that the fairways would be watered later in the week to stop them from drying up and maintain their softness, given the thickness of the rough.

Royal St. George’s, it seems, will give and take this week. But if the wind picks up like it did on Wednesday, it will be a mighty challenge.

Connor Worsdall, a 23-year-old Englishman playing in his first Open, had the privilege of being joined for the final two holes of his practice round Wednesday by No. 1 Dustin Johnson and DeChambeau.

Clearly thrilled, he said at the back of the 18th green that it was the best surprise he could have received before his opening round and that Johnson and DeChambeau briefly spoke to him before leaving the course.

“They just gave me some advice,” Worsdall said, “to just treat it like a normal 18 holes as much as you can.”

At Royal St. George’s that might just be impossible.

HOLYOKE – A crew from Caracas Construction Corp. in Ludlow continued work on a new eight-inch water main on Fairfield Avenue in the Highlands...

NORTHAMPTON — Attention, Hampshire County cannabis users: Your Green Package has arrived.One of the first recreational marijuana delivery services...

SANDWICH, England — Danny Willett shrugged his shoulders, grabbed his tee, and returned to his caddie beside the fourth tee at Royal St. George’s...

AMHERST — A virtual caucus to elect delegates for the Democratic Party convention will be held by the Amherst Democratic Town Committee on Thursday...

British Open: Royal St. George’s offers reminders of quirks of links golf

pressherald.com 14 July, 2021 - 04:10pm

The southernmost course in the Open rotation has been called unfair by some because of its many undulations that can play havoc even with good shots.

England’s Lee Westwood watches his drive on the first hole Wednesday during a practice round for the British Open, which starts Thursday at Royal St. George’s in Sandwich, England. Peter Morrison/Associated Press

SANDWICH, England — Danny Willett shrugged his shoulders, grabbed his tee, and returned to his caddie beside the fourth tee at Royal St. George’s.

WHERE: Royal St. George’s, Sandwich, England

TV SCHEDULE: Thursday and Friday, 4 a.m. to 3 p.m., Golf Channel; Saturday, 5-7 a.m., Golf Channel; 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., NBC; Sunday, 4-7 a.m., Golf Channel; 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., NBC

He’d just hit what he thought was the ideal drive during his final practice round at the British Open, only for one of the bumps on the course’s lunar-like landscape to throw it offline and into the rough.

“Kicked left,” Willett said, before smiling. “Never asked for it!”

Expect the unexpected will be the motto for the world’s best golfers this week as they get a crack at links golf for the first time in two years in this picturesque corner of southeast England.

In some respects, this British Open will feel as though golf has returned to normal. There will be some 30,000 fans roaming the Sandwich links daily – the biggest golf crowd at a major since the pandemic. One man was wearing a dragon onesie next to the ropes on the sixth hole Wednesday, having been cruelly fooled by a group of friends into wearing a costume.

Those ooohs and aaahs and rumbling roars from a distance are all part of Open lore, and they’ll return. How golf missed them last year, when its oldest championship was canceled for the first time since 1945 because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“Big-time sporting events need big-time crowds,” R&A chief executive Martin Slumbers said.

Then again, this week couldn’t be more different. Players are being kept in a strict bubble to comply with COVID-19 restrictions devised by the R&A and are at risk of disqualification for breaching rules.

“It’s probably inevitable that we will have some problems,” said Slumbers, who has already seen Masters champion Hideki Matsuyama and Zach Johnson, the 2015 British Open champion, withdraw after testing positive for the virus and Bubba Watson forced to pull out for being a close contact of a positive case.

During a practice round on Monday, Phil Mickelson appeared concerned he was getting too close to spectators. “He was like, ‘Can you just give me some space, I don’t know who you are,’” said English qualifier Nick Poppleton, who played alongside Mickelson.

On Wednesday, a spectator threw a ball to Mickelson for him to sign. The PGA champion immediately threw it back, without signing it, and wiped his hands with a towel.

And then there’s the course at Royal St. George’s, disrespected by some and unloved by many more for being unfair. Balls can be propelled almost sideways by the undulations on the fairways, some of which can be unhittable, especially in dry and fast conditions.

The fairways on the first and 17th holes promise to be particularly tough, not to mention the one on the fourth, as Willett can attest.

“It’s not my favorite of the (Open) rotation,” Brooks Koepka said of a course once described to American golfer Charles Howell III as “the world’s largest pinball machine.”

Helping the players this week is the rain that has lashed down on the course – the southernmost of the 10 in the rotation – which has made it green and soft. On the 17th hole Wednesday, a drive by Garrick Higgo plopped up upon landing on a side-slope, taking the pace out of the ball as it dribbled toward the semi rough. Some fairways also have been widened.

Against that, the rough is knee high in places and is thick and lush rather than wispy.

“There’s certain lies out there, it’s going to be a pitch back to the fairway,” big-hitting Bryson DeChambeau said of rough he described Tuesday as “diabolical.”

Lee Westwood said he’d been informed by Slumbers that the fairways would be watered later in the week to stop them from drying up and maintain their softness, given the thickness of the rough.

Royal St. George’s, it seems, will give and take this week. But if the wind picks up like it did on Wednesday, it will be a mighty challenge.

Connor Worsdall, a 23-year-old Englishman playing in his first Open, had the privilege of being joined for the final two holes of his practice round Wednesday by No. 1 Dustin Johnson and DeChambeau.

Clearly thrilled, he said at the back of the 18th green that it was the best surprise he could have received before his opening round and that Johnson and DeChambeau briefly spoke to him before leaving the course.

“They just gave me some advice,” Worsdall said, “to just treat it like a normal 18 holes as much as you can.”

At Royal St. George’s, that might just be impossible.

Comments are not available on this story.

Send questions/comments to the editors.

The 149th Open: Rory McIlroy reaps benefits of extra practice time after missed cut last week

Sky Sports 13 July, 2021 - 11:23am

McIlroy made an early exit at The Renaissance Club having added the tournament to his schedule at late notice, but that gave him the chance to head straight to Royal St George's to get in an extra couple of days practice for the final major of the year.

The 32-year-old has welcomed the opportunity to spread his practice out over five days rather than "cram all the preparation in" as he looks to add to his trend of winning a tournament in his first start after missing a halfway cut.

"You never want to miss a cut, as you say, but as missed cuts go, this wasn't necessarily a bad one," said the 2014 Open champion, who remains without a major title for almost seven years.

"I wasn't planning on playing the Scottish Open a few weeks ago anyway, so it was good to get a couple of competitive rounds in and just learn a little bit more and figure out what I need to do.

"It would have been great to stay and play an extra couple days in Scotland, but to be down here and get a few holes in on Saturday and play a full round on Sunday, it felt like I got a bit of a head start on the rest of the field, which feels good.

McIlroy is aware that, of the last nine occasions he has missed a cut, he has won in his next start three times and he insisted this was not a "chance statistic" as he makes learning from his mistakes a priority in his career.

"I think in golf you always learn more about your game when you've missed a cut or struggled or not played as well," he added. "I think anyone can play well, anyone can hit the ball great and give themselves chances to win, but I've always learned more from disappointments and from not doing as well.

Get Sky Sports today from just £18 extra a month.

"I've always tried to learn. I've always tried to figure out, 'okay, why did this week not go so well', and then you give yourself a couple of thoughts and they're fresh in your mind going into the next week.

"That's why I say, in golf, there's always next week, and that's a great thing, because you can right some wrongs pretty quickly. I've been able to do that in the past.

"I missed the cut at The Memorial a couple of years ago, and I won the Canadian Open the next week. I missed the cut at the Masters and then my next start was Quail Hollow and I won there.

"I had a few things fresh in my mind for a couple of months there, and I made sure if I ever got myself in a position like that again, I wasn't going to make the same mistakes."

McIlroy feels confident he has learned from his mistakes at the Scottish Open and revealed his unscheduled practice time in Sandwich had produced positive results.

Get the best prices and book a round at one of 1,700 courses across the UK & Ireland

"I feel good, I've hit the ball really good in practice the last few days," he said. "I feel like I figured something out on Sunday here, which has been really good. I hit the ball great on the range yesterday, and I hit the ball well today on the course.

"It's hard. You're thinking about a swing so much, and it's really about trying to get that blend of getting your mechanics right but then also letting your athletic ability and your instincts shine through, as well. It's just been trying to get that balance.

"But I feel like I figured something out on Sunday, and I feel good with it. I feel good about where I am going into the week."

British Open Jordan Spieth

Sports Stories

Top Stores