50 Cent draws outrage for insensitive Michael K. Williams posts

Entertainment

Yahoo News 07 September, 2021 - 08:04am 7 views

How old is Michael K Williams?

Tributes have been paid to US actor Michael K Williams, best known for starring in HBO drama series The Wire, following his death at the age of 54. bbc.comMichael K Williams: The Wire star remembered as 'a fine man and a rare talent'

How did Michael K get his scar?

“He was positioning the razor in his mouth to get between his middle finger and his ring finger, and then he just went – swiped me down my face, and this cut my face. “It was actually the first hit of the fight. ... The scar ran down the centre of his forehead, across his nose and right cheek before ending near his mouth. The IndependentHow Michael K Williams got the distinctive scar that helped launch his career

When did Michael K Williams die?

Actor Michael K. Williams, famous for his role as Omar Little in the HBO series 'The Wire', was found dead in his apartment on Sept. 6, 2021. He was 54. NBC New York‘The Wire' Actor Michael K. Williams Found Dead in Brooklyn

What actor died from the wire?

Michael K. Williams, the actor who brought a hard-edge charisma to his portrayal of Omar Little, the sawed-off-shotgun-wielding stickup man on the pioneering HBO series “The Wire,” was found dead on Monday in his home in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, the police said. He was 54. The New York TimesMichael K. Williams, Omar From 'The Wire,' Is Dead at 54

Grading Jack Coan's Performance In The Win Over Florida State

USA TODAY 07 September, 2021 - 10:17am

STATS: 26 com., 35 att., 74.3% comp., 366 yards, 4 TD, 1 INT

Coan was harassed throughout the game but he remained poised, and when Notre Dame was behind or needed plays to be made he made them. After Notre Dame fell behind 14-7 in the second quarter Coan led the offense to back-to-back scoring drives to put the Irish up 17-14 at halftime. He went 4-5 on the two drives for 61 yards and added two positives gains in the run game.

Florida State opened the second half with a long touchdown and that is when Coan truly went off. Coan went 8-8 for 175 yards and three touchdowns in the third quarter. After Florida State took that first second half lead Coan responded with two great throws to Kevin Austin for 29 and 37 yards, the second being a perfectly placed touchdown pass.

Those two throws were also notable because those were the throws Coan was missing in the first half. Coan went 14-19 for 160 yards and a pair of touchdowns in the first half, but his big misses were on down the field throws to Braden Lenzy and Austin on a deep balls where both players had at least a step. 

On the two third quarter throws Coan got the ball out much quicker, which was a clear adjustment to the speed of his receivers while also knowing where his arm strength is.  

Coan was also money on third down in the second half. He went 3-6 for 32 yards on third down in the first two quarters, throwing one touchdown and converting just two of the third down opportunities. In the second half Coan went 4-4 on third down, throwing for 104 yards and two touchdowns. His first touchdown pass came on 4th-and-1 when he hit Michael Mayer on a corner route for a touchdown.

So on third and fourth downs Coan went 9-12 for 178 yards and four touchdowns.

Coan did a good job handling the pressure at times, including his early third quarter throw to Austin that kicked off the first drive of the half. Florida State had an edge rusher come off the edge unblocked but Coan knew he had a one-on-one to Austin that he wanted, so he slid away from the edge rusher, set his feet and let loose with a downfield throw.

Coan was very aggressive in this game, throwing seven non-hail mary throws that went at least 20 yards past the line of scrimmage and he had four more attempts (all completions) that went at least 15 yards past the line, including his 41-yard touchdown score to Mayer. That throw didn't go to 20 yards simply because of how quickly Coan saw the defense blew the coverage and how quickly he got the ball out to Mayer.

In the game Coan completed 7-12 throws that traveled at least 15 yards past the line, which included the hail mary at the end of regulation that resulted in his only interception of the game. Coan threw for 199 yards on those seven completions. That's good for 16.6 yards per attempt (18.1 if you remove the hail mary attempt) and 28.4 yards per completion.

Coan completed an impressive 74.3% of his throws despite having two easy drops by Mayer. If those plays are made Coan is likely over 400 yards and he's at 80% completions. Coan's 74.3% completion rate was the best road mark by a Notre Dame quarterback since 2013, when Tommy Rees completed 77.3% of his throws against Air Force.

Coan wasn't perfect with how he managed the pocket, and there were times he rushed through his reads in a way that made me think he was concerned about the pass rush that was getting to him. He had a couple of opportunities to get rid of the ball downfield on some pressures but he rushed his reads a bit and took a sack.

Coan's timing with his reads was always where I want it to be, which is to be expected for an opener, and even more so in an opener when a player is on a new team. There were about 3-4 more throws he could have made if he would have worked through his progressions a bit cleaner.

I'm not sure if Coan had the ability to pull the ball on the RPOs that Notre Dame ran (he always handed it off) and I'm not sure if he had the freedom to pull the ball on handoffs when the backside of the line crashed. If he didn't then he needs to be given that freedom in the future because the inability to protect the backside edge was one of the many issues Notre Dame had in the run game.

Coan was not as sharp in the first half as I would want him to be. He completed throws but his ball placement wasn't nearly as good as it was in the first half. I loved that he took shots and that he gave Wilkins a chance to make a play, and his wideout rewarded that confidence, but Coan needs to get that ball at least four more inches to the outside. He also underthrew Kyren Williams on a fourth down that kept his back from having the momentum to get to the perimeter and move the chains.

Throw in Coan's underthrows in the first half and you have enough to knock his grade down to an A-, but that's a pretty picky grade. It's hard to find too much fault in a performance as good as Coan's, but those areas need to get cleaned up.

Here is Coan's passing chart against Florida State. The top row are throws that traveled at least 20 yards past the line. The second row are throws between 11-19 yards past the line, the third column is throws 1-9 yards past the line and the final row are throws behind the line.

The left column are throws that went to the left and were at least two yards outside the left hash to the left sideline. The right is the same in that direction. The middle column are throws that were between two yards outside each hash to the middle.

Become a premium Irish Breakdown member, which grants you access to all of our premium content, our premium message board and gets you a FREE subscription to Sports Illustrated! Click on the link below for more

Be sure to stay locked into Irish Breakdown all the time!

Wendell Pierce, more 'The Wire' co-stars mourn Michael K. Williams: 'Farewell my friend'

The Sun 06 September, 2021 - 08:43pm

Tributes poured in Monday evening for five-time Emmy Award nominee Michael K. Williams, star of "The Wire," as news spread of his death. He was 54.

A link has been sent to your friend's email address.

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Actor Michael K. Williams has been found dead in his New York City apartment. Tributes are pouring in for five-time Emmy Award nominee. Wochit

Tributes poured in Monday evening for five-time Emmy Award nominee Michael K. Williams, star of “The Wire” and “Lovecraft Country,” as news spread of his death.

Williams, 54, was found dead Monday afternoon at home in Brooklyn, New York police confirmed to USA TODAY. Police told The Associated Press that his death was being investigated as a possible drug overdose.

The actor, famed for his role as Omar Little on HBO’s “The Wire,” the Baltimore-based drama about crime and corruption, starred in a slew of HBO series, among them “Lovecraft Country,” “Boardwalk Empire” and “The Night Of.” His film roles included “12 Years A Slave,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Inherent Vice.”

Williams didn't shy away from discussing heavy topics or shedding light on the darkest moments of his life in interviews. 

In a 2016 NPR interview with Terry Gross, Williams talked about his drug use — specifically around the time he was working on "The Wire." 

"Around the second — more like third season of 'The Wire.' I was on drugs, and I was in jeopardy of destroying everything that I had worked so hard for," the late actor said. 

When asked about why he continued to use drugs in the midst of the success of the HBO show, Williams shared he didn't "feel worthy of (an) opportunity like that." 

"Then, you know, when I was given this character as Omar, I could've used it as a nurturing tool for myself. It could've been cathartic for me … Instead of actually doing the work and finding out how I could use this character to make myself feel about better, I just — I used it instead of me. It was… it was like my crutch." 

Fellow Hollywood actors took to social media Monday to share tributes and to remember the iconic Williams for the "beautiful soul" that he was. 

"Rest well my friend. JESUS!!! You will be missed deeply," Taraji P. Henson wrote on Instagram, alongside a slideshow of black and white photos of the actor.

Niecy Nash took to Instagram to honor her "When They See Us" co-star, writing, "You were a beautiful soul, a kind spirit & a good time… a talent beyond measure."

"Thank you for the many times we traded energy and you made me feel like family," she continued. "You left us too soon… Praying for your loved ones." 

Aaron Paul, Williams' co-star in the 2016 crime thriller "Triple 9," wrote in an Instagram tribute that he wished he had told Williams "more of what an impact you had on me." 

"You embraced this world with a loving heart and a gentle smile," the actor wrote. "Everyone who knew you would say that you lifted them up with such ease and grace and that they became a better person by simply knowing you. I have had the privilege to know that heart of yours and I am heartbroken to lose it. Thank you for chasing your dreams and teaching us all what it means to be decent. Your love for the craft will never be forgotten and I feel honored to have shared the screen with you brother." 

Leslie Jones reflected on working with Williams on 2016's "Ghostbusters" on Instagram, writing, "Not gonna lie this one (expletive) me up y'all!! Michael K Williams was a solid dude. He was so nice to me when we did ghostbusters and we bonded on many levels!!"

Jones added: "Damn I was just thinking the next time I saw him I was gonna tell him how dope of an actor he is. Damn y'all we lost a good one. Rest in love my brother." 

Kerry Washington, who appeared with Williams in the 2007 film "I Think I Love My Wife" and Spike Lee's 2008 film "Miracle at St. Anna," wrote on Instagram that she was "so heartbroken" over the news. 

"Thank you for the beauty and joy you brought to the world," the actress wrote. "Sending love and prayers to your friends, family and everyone who adored you 🙏🏾 me included ❤️ We adore you Sir." 

Lee shared a photo of him and Williams, writing that "it was a tough day." 

"I'm shook," Lee continued. "Our greats are leaving us left and right. God bless." 

Mariah Carey took to Twitter to share she'll "always" miss Williams. 

"A beautiful soul, a beautiful person, I'll miss you always," the singer wrote. "Thank you for blessing us with your talent." 

A beautiful soul, a beautiful person, I'll miss you always. Thank you for blessing us with your talent 💔 pic.twitter.com/Mt50HlY9CA

Ava DuVernay, "When They See Us" director, shared a series of photos of the late actor, some from the set of the Netflix limited series. "I remember the times you’d come on set even when you weren’t on the call sheet. Just to share a hug," DuVernay wrote. 

"To cheer us on. Strolling in like the King that you were. For just a flash to give some love - then gone." 

She continued: "I remember you sending me a picture of yourself as a young man and sharing with me that the boys whose story we were telling were a reflection of you - and we were going to get it right. I remember you taking the young actors to the beach on your own and talking to them about things I couldn’t - about being a young, Black man in New York at the time - and how grateful I was … You moved me. What you doubted in life, be certain of now, dear brother. Be certain. You were a flash of love - now gone. But never forgotten." 

Aisha Tyler remembered Williams as a "beautiful, passionate, expansive soul." 

"I felt so lucky to have known him, and we were all so fortunate to have enjoyed his incredible talent. He burned so very bright. Rest in power, MKW. You will forever be The King," she wrote. 

Camrus Johnson recalled the time he met Williams "about 8 years ago when I was still a background actor and man was he cool." 

"He’s been one of the black actors I’ve been able to look up to ever since, and I can’t believe he’s gone already," he wrote. 

I met Michael K. Williams about 8 years ago when I was still a background actor and man was he cool. He’s been one of the black actors I’ve been able to look up to ever since, and I can’t believe he’s gone already. We lost another one 😔 dang. Rest In peace pic.twitter.com/tADo9GaSCu

Jay Pharoah expressed on Instagram that hearing news of Williams' death made his "heart hurt." 

"I can't believe I'm typing this just saw him a few weeks ago. Did my first movie w/him…one of the nicest, talented, and (most) humble folks you could ever meet…," he wrote. 

Aldis Hodge wrote he couldn't "even believe this." 

"Rest in power, Mike. You were always a good brother," the actor wrote. "A fantastic artist and an even better human being. We’ll miss you."

Giancarlo Esposito wrote on Instagram he had "never met a more loving, caring, beautiful human being" than Williams.

"A true friend and thespian," he added. "I will forever miss you my dear brother." 

Orlando Jones, who appeared with Williams in "I Think I Love My Wife," wrote that of the "immense" pain he felt to hear Williams had died.

"Rest in Power Michael K Williams Prayers Up. Spirits shook. Pain immense. Keep your head up family," We’ll pull through but first let’s give this black man every last one of his (flowers). Hold on to the ones you (love)," Jones tweeted.

Rest in Power Michael K Williams💔💔💔💔💔💔 Prayers Up. Spirits shook. Pain immense. Keep your head up family. We’ll pull through but first let’s give this black man every last one of his 💐🌺🌸🙏🏿 Hold on to the ones you 💕 pic.twitter.com/1dGUBEp4d9

Williams' Omar Little, a “stick-up boy” based on real figures from Baltimore, was probably the most beloved character among devoted fans of “The Wire,” which ran from 2002 to 2008. 

And since his character on "The Wire" was a fan favorite, people often conflated the actor and the role he played. "People didn't even call me Mike, they called me Omar," he told The (Newark) Star-Ledger in a 2012 interview. "That mixed with my identity crisis and my addiction – and it was not a good mix. I had to stop trying to be Omar and just be Mike." 

Williams' co-stars from the HBO series also paid tribute to him on social media. 

Actor Isiah Whitlock Jr., who played Maryland state senator Clay Davis on the show, expressed he was "shocked and saddened" by Williams' death. 

"One of the nicest brothers on the planet with the biggest heart," he wrote. "An amazing actor and soul. May you RIP. God bless."

I can’t…I’m crushed. 💔 no words. I love you bro. RIP to the legend Michael K Williams aka one of the dopest Actors/Brother in the world. #Omar#TheWIRE FOR LIFE. I’m off the grid for a while hard to process this one. I love you bro smh damn 🤦🏿‍♂️ 😥😥😥 pic.twitter.com/UNK3F94opM

Tray Chaney, who also starred in "The Wire," said he was "crushed" to hear of Williams' death. 

"No words. I love you bro. RIP to the legend Michael K Williams aka one of the dopest Actors/Brother in the world," Chaney tweeted. "#Omar #TheWIRE FOR LIFE. I'm off the grid for a while to process this one. I love you bro." 

The depth of my love for this brother, can only be matched by the depth of my pain learning of his loss. A immensely talented man with the ability to give voice to the human condition portraying the lives of those whose humanity is seldom elevated until he sings their truth. pic.twitter.com/EvrESGSK8O

Wendell Pierce, who played Detective William “Bunk” Moreland, paid tribute to his former co-star on Twitter, sharing that "the depth of my love for this brother, can only be matched by the depth of my pain learning of his loss."

He called Williams an "immensely talented man with the ability to give voice to the human condition portraying the lives of those whose humanity is seldom elevated until he sings their truth."  

Pierce added that the HBO show "brought" them together and "immortalized Omar & Bunk in that 'scene' on a park bench. But for us, we aimed to take that moment in time together and say something about Black men. Our struggle with ourselves, internally, and each other."

Too gutted right now to say all that ought to be said. Michael was a fine man and a rare talent and on our journey together he always deserved the best words. And today those words won't come.

David Simon, creator of "The Wire," wrote he was "too gutted right now to say all that ought to be said."

"Michael was a fine man and a rare talent and on our journey together he always deserved the best words," Simon added. "And today those words won't come."

"A lot of people knew him as Omar, I knew him as Chalky," tweeted Chance the Rapper, referencing Williams' character on "Boardwalk Empire." "I’m sure his family knew his as Michael. Thanks for all you gave to encourage, enlighten and entertain people you didn’t even know. Praying for your people." 

Alec Baldwin, who starred alongside Williams in Emilio Estevez's 2018 film "The Public," remembered Williams as a "startlingly raw and powerful actor."

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

© 2021 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

We use cookies to personalize content and ads, provide social media features, improve our site and analyze our traffic. We may share information about your use of our site with our advertising, social and analytics providers. By clicking “Accept All Cookies” you agree to the use of these cookies as further described in our Privacy Policy

Wendell Pierce, more 'The Wire' co-stars mourn Michael K. Williams: 'Farewell my friend'

Yahoo Lifestyle 06 September, 2021 - 08:43pm

Tributes poured in Monday evening for five-time Emmy Award nominee Michael K. Williams, star of "The Wire," as news spread of his death. He was 54.

A link has been sent to your friend's email address.

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Actor Michael K. Williams has been found dead in his New York City apartment. Tributes are pouring in for five-time Emmy Award nominee. Wochit

Tributes poured in Monday evening for five-time Emmy Award nominee Michael K. Williams, star of “The Wire” and “Lovecraft Country,” as news spread of his death.

Williams, 54, was found dead Monday afternoon at home in Brooklyn, New York police confirmed to USA TODAY. Police told The Associated Press that his death was being investigated as a possible drug overdose.

The actor, famed for his role as Omar Little on HBO’s “The Wire,” the Baltimore-based drama about crime and corruption, starred in a slew of HBO series, among them “Lovecraft Country,” “Boardwalk Empire” and “The Night Of.” His film roles included “12 Years A Slave,” “Gone Baby Gone” and “Inherent Vice.”

Williams didn't shy away from discussing heavy topics or shedding light on the darkest moments of his life in interviews. 

In a 2016 NPR interview with Terry Gross, Williams talked about his drug use — specifically around the time he was working on "The Wire." 

"Around the second — more like third season of 'The Wire.' I was on drugs, and I was in jeopardy of destroying everything that I had worked so hard for," the late actor said. 

When asked about why he continued to use drugs in the midst of the success of the HBO show, Williams shared he didn't "feel worthy of (an) opportunity like that." 

"Then, you know, when I was given this character as Omar, I could've used it as a nurturing tool for myself. It could've been cathartic for me … Instead of actually doing the work and finding out how I could use this character to make myself feel about better, I just — I used it instead of me. It was… it was like my crutch." 

Fellow Hollywood actors took to social media Monday to share tributes and to remember the iconic Williams for the "beautiful soul" that he was. 

"Rest well my friend. JESUS!!! You will be missed deeply," Taraji P. Henson wrote on Instagram, alongside a slideshow of black and white photos of the actor.

Niecy Nash took to Instagram to honor her "When They See Us" co-star, writing, "You were a beautiful soul, a kind spirit & a good time… a talent beyond measure."

"Thank you for the many times we traded energy and you made me feel like family," she continued. "You left us too soon… Praying for your loved ones." 

Aaron Paul, Williams' co-star in the 2016 crime thriller "Triple 9," wrote in an Instagram tribute that he wished he had told Williams "more of what an impact you had on me." 

"You embraced this world with a loving heart and a gentle smile," the actor wrote. "Everyone who knew you would say that you lifted them up with such ease and grace and that they became a better person by simply knowing you. I have had the privilege to know that heart of yours and I am heartbroken to lose it. Thank you for chasing your dreams and teaching us all what it means to be decent. Your love for the craft will never be forgotten and I feel honored to have shared the screen with you brother." 

Leslie Jones reflected on working with Williams on 2016's "Ghostbusters" on Instagram, writing, "Not gonna lie this one (expletive) me up y'all!! Michael K Williams was a solid dude. He was so nice to me when we did ghostbusters and we bonded on many levels!!"

Jones added: "Damn I was just thinking the next time I saw him I was gonna tell him how dope of an actor he is. Damn y'all we lost a good one. Rest in love my brother." 

Kerry Washington, who appeared with Williams in the 2007 film "I Think I Love My Wife" and Spike Lee's 2008 film "Miracle at St. Anna," wrote on Instagram that she was "so heartbroken" over the news. 

"Thank you for the beauty and joy you brought to the world," the actress wrote. "Sending love and prayers to your friends, family and everyone who adored you 🙏🏾 me included ❤️ We adore you Sir." 

Lee shared a photo of him and Williams, writing that "it was a tough day." 

"I'm shook," Lee continued. "Our greats are leaving us left and right. God bless." 

Mariah Carey took to Twitter to share she'll "always" miss Williams. 

"A beautiful soul, a beautiful person, I'll miss you always," the singer wrote. "Thank you for blessing us with your talent." 

A beautiful soul, a beautiful person, I'll miss you always. Thank you for blessing us with your talent 💔 pic.twitter.com/Mt50HlY9CA

Ava DuVernay, "When They See Us" director, shared a series of photos of the late actor, some from the set of the Netflix limited series. "I remember the times you’d come on set even when you weren’t on the call sheet. Just to share a hug," DuVernay wrote. 

"To cheer us on. Strolling in like the King that you were. For just a flash to give some love - then gone." 

She continued: "I remember you sending me a picture of yourself as a young man and sharing with me that the boys whose story we were telling were a reflection of you - and we were going to get it right. I remember you taking the young actors to the beach on your own and talking to them about things I couldn’t - about being a young, Black man in New York at the time - and how grateful I was … You moved me. What you doubted in life, be certain of now, dear brother. Be certain. You were a flash of love - now gone. But never forgotten." 

Aisha Tyler remembered Williams as a "beautiful, passionate, expansive soul." 

"I felt so lucky to have known him, and we were all so fortunate to have enjoyed his incredible talent. He burned so very bright. Rest in power, MKW. You will forever be The King," she wrote. 

Camrus Johnson recalled the time he met Williams "about 8 years ago when I was still a background actor and man was he cool." 

"He’s been one of the black actors I’ve been able to look up to ever since, and I can’t believe he’s gone already," he wrote. 

I met Michael K. Williams about 8 years ago when I was still a background actor and man was he cool. He’s been one of the black actors I’ve been able to look up to ever since, and I can’t believe he’s gone already. We lost another one 😔 dang. Rest In peace pic.twitter.com/tADo9GaSCu

Jay Pharoah expressed on Instagram that hearing news of Williams' death made his "heart hurt." 

"I can't believe I'm typing this just saw him a few weeks ago. Did my first movie w/him…one of the nicest, talented, and (most) humble folks you could ever meet…," he wrote. 

Aldis Hodge wrote he couldn't "even believe this." 

"Rest in power, Mike. You were always a good brother," the actor wrote. "A fantastic artist and an even better human being. We’ll miss you."

Giancarlo Esposito wrote on Instagram he had "never met a more loving, caring, beautiful human being" than Williams.

"A true friend and thespian," he added. "I will forever miss you my dear brother." 

Orlando Jones, who appeared with Williams in "I Think I Love My Wife," wrote that of the "immense" pain he felt to hear Williams had died.

"Rest in Power Michael K Williams Prayers Up. Spirits shook. Pain immense. Keep your head up family," We’ll pull through but first let’s give this black man every last one of his (flowers). Hold on to the ones you (love)," Jones tweeted.

Rest in Power Michael K Williams💔💔💔💔💔💔 Prayers Up. Spirits shook. Pain immense. Keep your head up family. We’ll pull through but first let’s give this black man every last one of his 💐🌺🌸🙏🏿 Hold on to the ones you 💕 pic.twitter.com/1dGUBEp4d9

Williams' Omar Little, a “stick-up boy” based on real figures from Baltimore, was probably the most beloved character among devoted fans of “The Wire,” which ran from 2002 to 2008. 

And since his character on "The Wire" was a fan favorite, people often conflated the actor and the role he played. "People didn't even call me Mike, they called me Omar," he told The (Newark) Star-Ledger in a 2012 interview. "That mixed with my identity crisis and my addiction – and it was not a good mix. I had to stop trying to be Omar and just be Mike." 

Williams' co-stars from the HBO series also paid tribute to him on social media. 

Actor Isiah Whitlock Jr., who played Maryland state senator Clay Davis on the show, expressed he was "shocked and saddened" by Williams' death. 

"One of the nicest brothers on the planet with the biggest heart," he wrote. "An amazing actor and soul. May you RIP. God bless."

I can’t…I’m crushed. 💔 no words. I love you bro. RIP to the legend Michael K Williams aka one of the dopest Actors/Brother in the world. #Omar#TheWIRE FOR LIFE. I’m off the grid for a while hard to process this one. I love you bro smh damn 🤦🏿‍♂️ 😥😥😥 pic.twitter.com/UNK3F94opM

Tray Chaney, who also starred in "The Wire," said he was "crushed" to hear of Williams' death. 

"No words. I love you bro. RIP to the legend Michael K Williams aka one of the dopest Actors/Brother in the world," Chaney tweeted. "#Omar #TheWIRE FOR LIFE. I'm off the grid for a while to process this one. I love you bro." 

The depth of my love for this brother, can only be matched by the depth of my pain learning of his loss. A immensely talented man with the ability to give voice to the human condition portraying the lives of those whose humanity is seldom elevated until he sings their truth. pic.twitter.com/EvrESGSK8O

Wendell Pierce, who played Detective William “Bunk” Moreland, paid tribute to his former co-star on Twitter, sharing that "the depth of my love for this brother, can only be matched by the depth of my pain learning of his loss."

He called Williams an "immensely talented man with the ability to give voice to the human condition portraying the lives of those whose humanity is seldom elevated until he sings their truth."  

Pierce added that the HBO show "brought" them together and "immortalized Omar & Bunk in that 'scene' on a park bench. But for us, we aimed to take that moment in time together and say something about Black men. Our struggle with ourselves, internally, and each other."

Too gutted right now to say all that ought to be said. Michael was a fine man and a rare talent and on our journey together he always deserved the best words. And today those words won't come.

David Simon, creator of "The Wire," wrote he was "too gutted right now to say all that ought to be said."

"Michael was a fine man and a rare talent and on our journey together he always deserved the best words," Simon added. "And today those words won't come."

"A lot of people knew him as Omar, I knew him as Chalky," tweeted Chance the Rapper, referencing Williams' character on "Boardwalk Empire." "I’m sure his family knew his as Michael. Thanks for all you gave to encourage, enlighten and entertain people you didn’t even know. Praying for your people." 

Alec Baldwin, who starred alongside Williams in Emilio Estevez's 2018 film "The Public," remembered Williams as a "startlingly raw and powerful actor."

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

© 2021 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

Entertainment Stories