71 feet! Day's INCREDIBLE putt at THE NORTHERN TRUST

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PGA TOUR 17 August, 2021 - 01:08pm 19 views

Where is the Northern Trust played?

The first leg of the race for the tour's championship will take place at Liberty National Golf Club in New Jersey as the course hosts the 2021 Northern Trust. CBSSports.com2021 Northern Trust odds: Surprising PGA picks, golf predictions from model that's called seven majors

2021 FedEx Cup Playoffs: Standings, schedule, format and everything to know as postseason golf begins

CBS Sports 18 August, 2021 - 05:10am

After 47 events (including six major championships), the longest regular season in PGA Tour history has ended and the three-week postseason is here. The FedEx Cup Playoffs start this week with The Northern Trust, followed by the BMW Championship and big-money Tour Championship at East Lake, which wraps up the entire 50-event season.

Here's a breakdown (and reminder!) of how the FedEx Cup Playoffs work, what to expect and how everything will play out over the next several weeks as the best in the world make one final push toward the finale.

The top 125 in the FedEx Cup standings, via points accumulated throughout the year, will play The Northern Trust this week. Some of them by the narrowest of margins

Though all three events are 72-hole stroke-play tournaments, the fields gradually get smaller as we zero in on a $15 million winner at the Tour Championship. The metrics change during the playoffs, too, as everything is quadrupled. In the last regular season event, Kevin Kisner got 500 FedEx Cup points for winning the Wyndham Championship. The winner of the first two FedEx Cup Playoffs events will receive 2,000. That goes for every slot on the leaderboard (300 for second becomes 1,200 and so on). Only five golfers surpassed the 2,000-point total during the entire regular season, which means the FedEx Cup standings can shift quite a bit over the next few weeks. Winners are disproportionately rewarded.

For example, if Sergio Garcia, currently ranked 40th in the FedEx Cup standings, wins The Northern Trust, he would shoot to the top of the board with 3,020 FedEx Cup points (his current 1,020 plus 2,000 for winning). Only one of the top eight players in the current standings could stay ahead of him by finishing second and receiving 1,200 points. Nobody could stay ahead of him solely from a third-place finish. 

The first two winners will sit pretty at the Tour Championship. In the first year of this format, Patrick Reed won The Northern Trust and started the Tour Championship in fourth. Justin Thomas won the second playoff event and started the Tour Championship in first. Last year, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm won the first two events and started first and second at the Tour Championship. There is a lot of movement to be had over the next to weeks before the grand finale.

The top 70 in the FedEx Cup standings after The Northern Trust move on to the BMW Championship. Then the top 30 after that move on to the Tour Championship.

Going into the Tour Championship inside the top five or top 10 in the FedEx Cup standings is important because of how scoring is dispersed. Whoever is first in the standings after the BMW Championship starts the Tour Championship at 10 under, and the event is played under normal scoring conditions from there. Second starts at 8 under and so on (see full numbers below). With so much money at stake, those margins become more meaningful than even a normal week. The eventual winners of the last two have started first and fifth.

The numbers are startling. The winner of the Tour Championship gets $15 million. If you make it to the Tour Championship, you're guaranteed $395,000. Everyone who makes it to the BMW Championship is guaranteed at least $140,000. Heck, everyone who finished in the top 125 is guaranteed at least $101,000. And all of this is on top of what the tournaments themselves pay out. Add it all up, and FedEx is giving out $60 million in bonus funds to the best players in the world.

The current top 10 going into The Northern Trust is a collection of the best, most consistent players all year. Any of the 10 could theoretically win it, although since the FedEx Cup Playoffs went from four events to three events two years ago, the eventual winners have been ranked No. 15 (Dustin Johnson) and No. 6 (Rory McIlroy) in the FedEx Cup standings before the playoffs started.

I love both Morikawa and Spieth in this spot, both because they have played well this year (and recently) and because they have a nice head start on most of the other 123 golfers. There are also some names outside the top 10 like Xander Schauffele (13th), Hideki Matsuyama (14th), Brooks Koepka (15th), Dustin Johnson (17th) and Rory McIlroy (26th) that should be threats over the next several weeks.

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2021 FedEx Cup Playoffs: Standings, schedule, format and everything to know as postseason golf begins

New York Post 18 August, 2021 - 05:10am

After 47 events (including six major championships), the longest regular season in PGA Tour history has ended and the three-week postseason is here. The FedEx Cup Playoffs start this week with The Northern Trust, followed by the BMW Championship and big-money Tour Championship at East Lake, which wraps up the entire 50-event season.

Here's a breakdown (and reminder!) of how the FedEx Cup Playoffs work, what to expect and how everything will play out over the next several weeks as the best in the world make one final push toward the finale.

The top 125 in the FedEx Cup standings, via points accumulated throughout the year, will play The Northern Trust this week. Some of them by the narrowest of margins

Though all three events are 72-hole stroke-play tournaments, the fields gradually get smaller as we zero in on a $15 million winner at the Tour Championship. The metrics change during the playoffs, too, as everything is quadrupled. In the last regular season event, Kevin Kisner got 500 FedEx Cup points for winning the Wyndham Championship. The winner of the first two FedEx Cup Playoffs events will receive 2,000. That goes for every slot on the leaderboard (300 for second becomes 1,200 and so on). Only five golfers surpassed the 2,000-point total during the entire regular season, which means the FedEx Cup standings can shift quite a bit over the next few weeks. Winners are disproportionately rewarded.

For example, if Sergio Garcia, currently ranked 40th in the FedEx Cup standings, wins The Northern Trust, he would shoot to the top of the board with 3,020 FedEx Cup points (his current 1,020 plus 2,000 for winning). Only one of the top eight players in the current standings could stay ahead of him by finishing second and receiving 1,200 points. Nobody could stay ahead of him solely from a third-place finish. 

The first two winners will sit pretty at the Tour Championship. In the first year of this format, Patrick Reed won The Northern Trust and started the Tour Championship in fourth. Justin Thomas won the second playoff event and started the Tour Championship in first. Last year, Dustin Johnson and Jon Rahm won the first two events and started first and second at the Tour Championship. There is a lot of movement to be had over the next to weeks before the grand finale.

The top 70 in the FedEx Cup standings after The Northern Trust move on to the BMW Championship. Then the top 30 after that move on to the Tour Championship.

Going into the Tour Championship inside the top five or top 10 in the FedEx Cup standings is important because of how scoring is dispersed. Whoever is first in the standings after the BMW Championship starts the Tour Championship at 10 under, and the event is played under normal scoring conditions from there. Second starts at 8 under and so on (see full numbers below). With so much money at stake, those margins become more meaningful than even a normal week. The eventual winners of the last two have started first and fifth.

The numbers are startling. The winner of the Tour Championship gets $15 million. If you make it to the Tour Championship, you're guaranteed $395,000. Everyone who makes it to the BMW Championship is guaranteed at least $140,000. Heck, everyone who finished in the top 125 is guaranteed at least $101,000. And all of this is on top of what the tournaments themselves pay out. Add it all up, and FedEx is giving out $60 million in bonus funds to the best players in the world.

The current top 10 going into The Northern Trust is a collection of the best, most consistent players all year. Any of the 10 could theoretically win it, although since the FedEx Cup Playoffs went from four events to three events two years ago, the eventual winners have been ranked No. 15 (Dustin Johnson) and No. 6 (Rory McIlroy) in the FedEx Cup standings before the playoffs started.

I love both Morikawa and Spieth in this spot, both because they have played well this year (and recently) and because they have a nice head start on most of the other 123 golfers. There are also some names outside the top 10 like Xander Schauffele (13th), Hideki Matsuyama (14th), Brooks Koepka (15th), Dustin Johnson (17th) and Rory McIlroy (26th) that should be threats over the next several weeks.

© 2004-2021 CBS Interactive. All Rights Reserved.

CBS Sports is a registered trademark of CBS Broadcasting Inc. Commissioner.com is a registered trademark of CBS Interactive Inc.

Images by Getty Images and US Presswire

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These Cookies allow us to collect information about how visitors use our properties. Some examples include counting visits and traffic sources, so we can measure and improve the performance of our services. If you do not allow these Cookies we will not know when users have visited our properties and will not be able to monitor performance.

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2021 Northern Trust picks, odds, field grade, golf predictions, best bets at Liberty National

CBS Sports 18 August, 2021 - 05:10am

Liberty National Golf Club welcomes the return of the PGA Tour for the second time in the last three years this week as the Northern Trust kicks off the FedEx Cup Playoffs action. The Tour also went to Liberty National in 2009, 2013 and most recently in 2019 when Patrick Reed took home a victory. Though it is not the most architecturally-renowned golf course, the aesthetics are very nice -- New York City in the background, the Hudson River in the foreground and the best players on the planet for four straight days.

Let's take a closer look at this week's contest with odds provided via Caesars Sportsbook.

1. Jon Rahm returns: It has been such a strange summer for Rahm. Since Phl Mickeslon won the PGA Championship, we have only seen Rahm complete a single stroke-play event in the United States. That was the U.S. Open, which Rahm won. Other than that, he had to withdraw with a positive COVID-19 test with a six-stroke lead after three rounds at the Memorial Tournament, he played twice in Europe (top 10s at the Scottish Open and Open Championship) and then had to withdraw from the Olympics because of another positive COVID-19 test. He also did not play the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational two weeks ago. By most metrics, he's been the best player in the world so far in 2021, but he's had very few opportunities to prove it this summer. Still, he's been beaten by just 15 golfers in his last five events and will be a factor this week at Liberty National.

2. Extra importance of winning: Since the FedEx Cup Playoffs went to three events two years ago, winners of the first two events have started no worse than fourth at the Tour Championship. Why is that a big deal? Well, remember the Tour Championship starts with staggered scores, and the top players receive a greater advantage going into the finale with $15 million on the line. The four winners of the first two playoff events over the last two years have gone on to net $22.3 million in combined bonus money at the Tour Championship. So a win goes a long way toward the bank account right now but also several weeks from now when everything gets counted up at East Lake.

3. Cinderella stories: We've also seen some players who were a bit buried going into the playoffs emerge at the Tour Championship and cash in on a perfectly-timed hot streak. Kevin Kisner was 40th last year going into the playoffs and finished 23rd at the Tour Championship. Mackenzie Hughes went from 52nd to 14th. Scottie Scheffler from 24th to 5th. The year before, Reed went from 50th to 9th and got nearly $1 million in bonus money. Jason Kokrak went from 42nd to 14th. Abraham Ancer, who is a fun sleeper this week, went from 67th to 21st. There will be a few guys this week who pull themselves out of the 60s or 70s and ride some great golf all the way to the Tour Championship. It's always going to be tough to surpass the top-10 guys in the standings, but there's plenty of money to be had for players who are not necessarily superstars as well.

It's as good as non-major fields get with pretty much everyone who's done anything on the PGA Tour this year in attendance. Collin Morikawa and Jordan Spieth go into the week in the first and second positions, respectively, in the FedEx Cup standings, but that will almost certainly change over the four-day event. As noted above, Rahm is making his first appearance since nearly stealing the Open Championship, and Justin Thomas, Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy will be there as well. Louis Oosthuizen is the only player in the top 125 in the FedEx Cup standings who will not play. He withdrew from last week's Wyndham Championship with a neck injury. Grade: A+

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Northern Trust Open odds, expert selections and DFS: Leaning in on Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas and Daniel Berger

The Athletic 17 August, 2021 - 08:05pm

Northern Trust Open odds, expert selections and DFS: Leaning in on Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas and Daniel Berger

The PGA Tour heads to my home state of New Jersey for the first leg of the FedEx Cup Playoffs and the Northern Trust at Liberty National in Jersey City. Liberty National has hosted the Northern Trust in 2019 and the Barclays in 2009 and 2013. Liberty National was also the site of the President’s Cup in 2017. The par 71 layout measures just more than 7,350 yards and features stunning views of Manhattan along the Hudson River, with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island being front and center.

For the 124 players teeing it up (Louis Oosthuizen is sitting this one out), it is their chance to solidify their position for the rest of the FedEx Cup Playoffs and possibly jump to the top of the FedEx Cup standings and closer to that $15 million prize that goes to the FedEx Cup winner. The PGA Tour professionals had many complaints after playing the Barclays at Liberty National back in 2009, and it underwent a facelift before the PGA Tour returned in 2013. While Liberty National doesn’t have the same course history as Wyndham did last week, some players feel very comfortable here. Patrick Reed won in 2019 and flourished for the United States alongside Jordan Spieth in the 2017 President’s Cup. Webb Simpson hasn’t finished outside the top 20 in each of his three visits to Liberty National. Adam Scott won here in 2013 and finished fifth in 2019.

Jordan Spieth (16 to 1 to win) has had a tremendous bounce-back year on the PGA Tour. It was news to all of us that he had suffered through a wrist injury that prevented him from playing his best until he announced it just before the WGC Dell Match Play. Over his last 36 rounds, he is seventh in strokes gained approach and sixth in strokes gained short game. He has even been more consistent off the tee, where he has picked up yardage and largely avoided making big mistakes to the left of the fairway. He has decent history here, finishing T6 in 2019 and playing well at the 2017 President’s Cup.

Justin Thomas (25 to 1) has had a tough year on and off the golf course. He hasn’t been his dominant self much this year. If you take away his Sunday round at the Players Championship, it looks that much worse. His ball-striking was good at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, but he couldn’t buy a putt. That luck followed him to the WGC FedEx St. Jude, where he lost 5.2 strokes on the greens. He gained 6.2 strokes on approach at the WGC, and that’s why I like him at these odds. He’s too good a player to suffer from his putting for too long.

Daniel Berger (28 to 1) has been steady as can be of late. He looked poised for a big year after his win at Pebble Beach but has suffered through some nagging injuries and just not quite putting it all together. He’s fourth in the field in strokes gained on approach, and sixth in strokes gained overall over his last 36 rounds. He earned an incredible 9.9 strokes on approach at the WGC FedEx St. Jude and very easily could have won. He has some experience at this course, having competed in the 2017 President’s Cup, and should be a decent course fit.

Adam Scott (40 to 1) has struggled this season, but his swing looked like vintage Adam Scott at the Wyndham Championship. He gained 6.9 strokes on approach and more than nine strokes from tee to green. He has been very good on the year with his putting, so I wouldn’t be too worried about that four-footer he missed for the win on the first playoff hole. He has won here in 2013 and had a top 5 in 2019. I’ll ride the hot hand and see if he can keep it going this week.

Jhonattan Vegas (100 to 1) is second in the field in strokes gained off the tee, and ninth in strokes gained ball striking over his last 36 rounds. He has nine straight made cuts as well as a solid showing at the Olympics. He has two second-place finishes during that time frame and has been a better putter over his last three tournaments. He has gained more than two strokes on the green in each of his previous three tournaments. He has performed well in this tournament over the years, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he got off to a fast start.

Jon Rahm ($11,500) hasn’t teed it up since his fantastic showing at the Open Championship. He has been sidelined because of a positive COVID-19 test and had to miss the Olympics. He finished T3 at this course back in 2019 and has had a fantastic season. Ever since he got together with Callaway, and they finally figured out how to set up his putter, he has been a threat. The price is tough to pay because of this field, but with the strength of the low 9K to high 8K range, I will build some lineups with Rahm as the highest-priced player and then drop down to Berger and Webb Simpson.

Jordan Spieth ($10,800) See above.

Collin Morikawa ($10,400) had an uncharacteristically average week on approach at the WGC FedEx St. Jude. Some of that can be attributed to all the travel between winning the Open Championship and making a run at a medal in Tokyo. I expect him to fix that issue this week after not teeing it up since Memphis. An $1100 discount from Jon Rahm is tough to ignore.

Rory McIlroy ($10,000) looks to be getting back to his dominant self. He has gained an average of 4.9 strokes on approach over his last five tournaments. Only his putter has held him back from contending at the U.S. Open and the WGC FedEx St. Jude. He finished T6 here in 2019, and only a pedestrian weekend kept him from winning.

Bryson DeChambeau ($9,600) at this price has to be in play. A $1900 discount from Jon Rahm and all of the same upside. He finally got back to striking the ball well on approach at St. Jude, where he gained 3.9 strokes. His putting has been getting back to his usual excellent form as well.

Daniel Berger ($9,100) See above.

Webb Simpson ($8,900) was the horse for the course last week and had some decent history here as well. I was concerned that he hadn’t been hitting it well on approach in the lead up to the Wyndham, but he gained over eight strokes on approach and only lost because of his play around the greens.

Harris English ($8,800) has been in excellent form over the last two months. Only a bad reaction to being put on the clock at St. Jude kept him from winning his third tournament of the year.

Paul Casey ($8,700) is second in the field in strokes gained on approach over his last 36 rounds. He has been in excellent form, and I don’t see why I shouldn’t make him a big part of my plans this week. He has three top 10s in his last five tournaments.

Patrick Reed ($8,600) is not in the best form coming into this week but has won here in 2019 and performed well in the 2017 President’s Cup as well. He has a history of stepping up in big tournaments and when big paychecks are on the line, and this is a low price for the type of player he can be.

Adam Scott ($8,400) See above.

Joaquin Niemann ($8,100) may go a bit overlooked at this price. He hasn’t been quite as sharp on approach as he was earlier in the year, but he has been almost automatic off the tee and has improved with his putting. I’m going to mix him into GPP lineups this week but probably avoid him in cash with the other options.

Sungjae Im ($7,800) gained over eight strokes from tee to green at the Wyndham Championship but struggled once there. He lost seven strokes putting over his last two tournaments. If he had putt just a bit better, we could be talking about Sungjae being in the high 8K range.

Ian Poulter ($7,700) has made seven straight cuts and is first in the field in strokes gained putting. Poulter finished T10 in 2019 and has a lot to play for with a possible Ryder Cup birth at stake.

Sergio Garcia ($7,600) has made the cut in five straight and hasn’t finished outside the top 26 during that time. He has suffered on the greens and somehow still managed to play well. I will take his ball-striking this week and hope he can at least have an average putter.

Shane Lowry ($7,500) has 10 straight made cuts with four top 10s during that time. His driver has been a bit of a problem lately, but his ball-striking around the green game has made the difference. I trust Lowry for cash and may pivot to Keegan Bradley at the same price in some GPP lineups.

Kevin Streelman ($7,400) killed everyone with his missed cut at the John Deere Classic. He then stepped up at the Open Championship and got back to the game he played all season. If you follow him on Twitter, you would know he is almost as deadly with his replies as he is with his irons. He burned Colt Knost epically this week.

Jhonattan Vegas ($7,100) See above.

Charley Hoffman ($7,000) hasn’t been nearly as good as he was since the Charles Schwab Challenge, but he has taken some time off since the Open Championship, and I can’t ignore him at this price.

Talor Gooch ($6,800) missed the cut at the Wyndham because of his putting. He gained 2.4 strokes on approach over his first two days, and if he can get back to average on the greens, he could surprise this week.

Adam Hadwin ($6,700) is hot right now. He has gained strokes in every major category except around the green over his last two tournaments, where he finished inside the top 10 in both — great price for a player in excellent recent form.

Mackenzie Hughes ($6,700) has been solid ever since the U.S. Open. He continues to make cuts and do it in various ways against some of the best fields. He has five straight made cuts with three top 15 finishes during that stretch.

Matt Wallace ($6,500) is an excellent ball striker that shouldn’t be overlooked at this price. I will be looking at him and C.T. Pan in this price range for GPP lineups.

Where I need to make up ground, I may go off the board and take Paul Casey in some spots. I think he will be low-owned in this field. Where I am sitting solidly, I am eyeing up Adam Scott. Let me know your plan in the comments.

 Aug 14

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PGA Betting Picks and Guide: The Northern Trust (2021) - BettingPros

BettingPros 17 August, 2021 - 10:03am

Following what has been an intense 3-4 final weeks of the regular season which had no shortage of drama, the 125 best golfers (per the FedEx Cup points) remain as the playoffs begin this week in New Jersey. With a field that will cut be down to 70 following this event, let’s take a look at the field as it stands and find the value where it remains.

Located in Jersey City, NJ, Liberty National features backdrops of Manhatten as players try to navigate the 7,410 yards. The length won’t go unnoticed, as the course plays the 7th longest on Tour this season.

Featuring bentgrass surfaces throughout, players will notice some differences from the last time they played here in 2019. The most notable changes have come on #2, #9, #13, and #15, where a combination of bunkers and tee box length was added into the mix.

There are not many, if any, players on Tour that are hotter than Jordan Spieth.

Coming into this week as the #2 ranked player in the world, Spieth hasn’t missed a cut since January and, over his last five events, doesn’t have a single finish outside the top 20. He also has two solo 2nds in his last five as well.

Going back over his starts since the beginning of April, Spieth’s finishes become even more impressive with five top 10s and a win to go along with those two aforementioned seconds.

A quick look at the metrics shows just how good his form has been, as he ranks inside the top 10 on tour in SG: Total (1.457, SG: Around the green (.433), and putts per round (28.16).

As far as course history here at Liberty National, Spieth has three starts since 2013, including a T19, T19, and a strong showing while on the winning President’s Cup team here in 2017.

If Spieth can start strong on Thursday, there’s no reason he can’t go super low in a field of heavy hitters he’ll be anything but intimidated by as his confidence continues to surge.

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