A Church Camp Didn't Require Masks or Vaccinations—And Nearly 200 People Got COVID

Health

msnNOW 01 September, 2021 - 04:19pm 42 views

Welcome to the Bleacher Report WWE and All Elite Wrestling mailbag.

The B/R community has always been outspoken, especially when it comes to opinions on pro wrestling and its biggest stars.

We will answer your questions and react to your hot takes about WWE, AEW and the world of pro wrestling.

This week's topic of discussion was bold predictions for the upcoming AEW All Out pay-per-view on Sunday. The show will feature CM Punk's first match in seven years, but there are other rumors over who else will make an appearance. 

Check out what the B/R community thought.

There were several predictions based around CM Punk losing in his first match for AEW against Allin. Let's discuss the heel-turn scenario first.

I highly doubt AEW will turn one of its most popular babyfaces into a bad guy right now. Allin is too valuable in the role he has at the moment. He is also a little too small to be an effective villain against anyone bigger than him. 

However, the possibility of Punk losing in his first AEW match is not out of the question. While the logical conclusion would be to assume he will win, he may have requested to put Allin over because it would be shocking and more beneficial for the younger man's career.

While I don't think that is what will happen, I wouldn't be shocked to see Allin with his hand raised in victory at the end of the night. 

Hangman recently took some time off, but if he is set to return soon, this would be a great way to do it.

Having him show up during Christian Cage vs. Kenny Omega or a post-match brawl would be the best route to take. That way, he and his former teammate can pick up where they left off.

Cage could be getting attacked by The Elite afterward when Page shows up and cleans house. It would immediately put him back in the hunt for the gold and give the crowd a fun moment to remember.

However, the amount of time off Page is taking is unknown, so it may be a little while before we see him, especially if AEW has other plans it wants to take care of first. 

This is a possibility, but I doubt it will happen. Jericho is not retiring or leaving AEW any time soon. 

                                  

If something like this did happen, I wouldn't put it past Tony Khan to invite them in and make sure it was seen on his show. The kind of buzz such an invasion would generate would be too valuable to ignore as WCW did. 

                           

If anybody is going to cost Punk the win to begin a storyline, it would be Cole. He's way better at being a heel and putting him in the ring with Punk should be a higher priority than booking Punk vs. Bryan, which we have seen in and out of WWE before. 

                              

This was clearly meant to be a joke, but don't count Paul Wight out. The 49-year-old is in great shape and is well-rested. He and Marshall may not steal the show, but they could surprise us with their performance. 

Enjoy our content? Join our newsletter to get the latest in sports news delivered straight to your inbox!

Read full article at msnNOW

Reacting to B/R Community's Boldest Predictions for AEW All Out PPV

CBS News 02 September, 2021 - 07:00am

Welcome to the Bleacher Report WWE and All Elite Wrestling mailbag.

The B/R community has always been outspoken, especially when it comes to opinions on pro wrestling and its biggest stars.

We will answer your questions and react to your hot takes about WWE, AEW and the world of pro wrestling.

This week's topic of discussion was bold predictions for the upcoming AEW All Out pay-per-view on Sunday. The show will feature CM Punk's first match in seven years, but there are other rumors over who else will make an appearance. 

Check out what the B/R community thought.

There were several predictions based around CM Punk losing in his first match for AEW against Allin. Let's discuss the heel-turn scenario first.

I highly doubt AEW will turn one of its most popular babyfaces into a bad guy right now. Allin is too valuable in the role he has at the moment. He is also a little too small to be an effective villain against anyone bigger than him. 

However, the possibility of Punk losing in his first AEW match is not out of the question. While the logical conclusion would be to assume he will win, he may have requested to put Allin over because it would be shocking and more beneficial for the younger man's career.

While I don't think that is what will happen, I wouldn't be shocked to see Allin with his hand raised in victory at the end of the night. 

Hangman recently took some time off, but if he is set to return soon, this would be a great way to do it.

Having him show up during Christian Cage vs. Kenny Omega or a post-match brawl would be the best route to take. That way, he and his former teammate can pick up where they left off.

Cage could be getting attacked by The Elite afterward when Page shows up and cleans house. It would immediately put him back in the hunt for the gold and give the crowd a fun moment to remember.

However, the amount of time off Page is taking is unknown, so it may be a little while before we see him, especially if AEW has other plans it wants to take care of first. 

This is a possibility, but I doubt it will happen. Jericho is not retiring or leaving AEW any time soon. 

                                  

If something like this did happen, I wouldn't put it past Tony Khan to invite them in and make sure it was seen on his show. The kind of buzz such an invasion would generate would be too valuable to ignore as WCW did. 

                           

If anybody is going to cost Punk the win to begin a storyline, it would be Cole. He's way better at being a heel and putting him in the ring with Punk should be a higher priority than booking Punk vs. Bryan, which we have seen in and out of WWE before. 

                              

This was clearly meant to be a joke, but don't count Paul Wight out. The 49-year-old is in great shape and is well-rested. He and Marshall may not steal the show, but they could surprise us with their performance. 

Enjoy our content? Join our newsletter to get the latest in sports news delivered straight to your inbox!

Those left in Afghanistan complain of broken US promises

The Washington Post 02 September, 2021 - 12:29am

He was told to stay home and not worry, that they would be evacuated.

Late Monday, however, his heart sank as he heard that the final U.S. flights had left Kabul's airport, followed by the blistering staccato sound of Taliban gunfire, celebrating what they saw as their victory over America.

“They lied to us,” Habibi said of the U.S. government. He is among hundreds of American citizens and green card holders stranded in the Afghan capital.

Victoria Nuland, undersecretary of state for political affairs, would not address individual cases but said all U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who could not get evacuation flights or were otherwise stranded had been contacted individually in the past 24 hours and told to expect further information about routes out once those have been arranged.

“We will communicate directly to them personalized instructions on what they should do, when they should do it, and how the United States government feels we are best positioned to help them do that," added State Department spokesman Ned Price.

For some of those who remain, however, the trauma of trying for nearly two weeks to get onto a U.S. plane is still harrowing.

Habibi, an electrician who has lived in Richmond since 2015 on a special immigration visa, had returned to Afghanistan for a visit on June 22 — the first time his family had been back since 2019. Their return flight was to have been Aug. 31.

About Aug. 18, Habibi said he got an email from the U.S. government saying that his family — all green card holders except for their youngest, who has a U.S. passport — would be evacuated. 

Subsequent emails said he should take his family to the airport. He obeyed, but the mad crush of people prevented him from getting near the gate on his first two attempts.

His daughter, Madina, who at 15 has flawless English and serves as the family spokesperson, said she and her younger sister were almost trampled at the airport. The family wrote back, “It's too dangerous. We can't go into the crowd,” she said.

The emails kept arriving, saying they should go to the airport, she said.

By Aug. 25, the emails had been replaced by phone calls from Arlington, Virginia, Madina said. The callers, who identified themselves as being from the U.S. Embassy, told the family to stay at home and that the government was aware of their location, she said, speaking for her father.

Habibi said he still made four or five more attempts, even recruiting friends and relatives to wade into the crowd with the family, forming a kind of protective cordon. The youngest of the four girls, Dunya, is 2 and was born in the U.S.

Habibi said that on at least two occasions, he got close enough to the gate that his passport was scanned but was refused entry. He shouted at the U.S. soldiers, waving his documents.

“What does this green card even mean? Nothing. They did nothing,” he said.

Madina, who spoke to most of the callers from Virginia, said she told them the family was from Richmond. Even as the evacuations came to an end, Madina said one caller promised, "We are going to get you out. You are not going to get stuck. Don't worry. We know where you are."

Habibi said they even pledged to pick them up in a car. 

“They lied. They did nothing," he said.

Habibi says he hasn't been threatened by the Taliban and that no one has bothered him but he is still afraid. News stories and horrifying posts on social media have him convinced that the Taliban will kill him, he said, although he admitted he doesn't know of anyone being targeted.

“I’m just afraid. I follow the news,” he said.

He said he knows of many families, some with U.S. green cards, who remain in Afghanistan.

Madina said Marcia Vigar Perez, a teacher at Dumbarton Elementary, her former school, started a prayer chain for her safe return.

“Every day they call me,” she said.

Another Afghan native who asked to be identified only as Ajmal, fearing retribution, said he, his two brothers and their families — 16 people in all — were granted emergency immigrant visas to be evacuated after another brother in Virginia submitted the paperwork.

Ajmal displayed emails from the U.S. government that said “please make your way to the Hamid Karzai International Airport" and use the Camp Sullivan Gate, not the civilian entrance, although he also was warned that the gate could change daily.

He said he and his relatives went to the airport, but heavy gunfire by the Taliban and the crush of thousands of people sent them back home. On one occasion, he said he received an email telling him and his family they would be picked up at a spot near the airport at 3 a.m. He and his family waited on the street until 9 a.m., but no one came, he said.

His brother Wais, a U.S. citizen living in Virginia, said he had petitioned senators and filled out paperwork to get his family to America.

“I am frustrated and angry" at U.S. officials, Wais said. “All the time they say, ‘We are working on it, we are working on it,' but then — nothing.”

Associated Press writer Matthew Lee in Washington contributed.

According to transcripts, neither leader discussed threat of an imminent Taliban takeover, but Biden had a message: 'perception' needed to improve.

The clandestine operation resulted in the successful evacuation of hundreds of American citizens and vulnerable Afghans.

"I was going to stay alive one way or another, even if I had to turn the sofa over on top of me," one resident said. "I was going to survive this."

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Ahmad Wali Massoud, an anti-Taliban resistance representative, believes a civil war in Afghanistan is "very likely" following failing peace talks with the Taliban.

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The U.S. military service members who were injured in the bombing at Hamid Karzai International Airport during the frantic evacuations last week are now all back in the United States, where they continue to be treated.

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Those left in Afghanistan complain of broken US promises

WGEM 02 September, 2021 - 12:29am

He was told to stay home and not worry, that they would be evacuated.

Late Monday, however, his heart sank as he heard that the final U.S. flights had left Kabul's airport, followed by the blistering staccato sound of Taliban gunfire, celebrating what they saw as their victory over America.

“They lied to us,” Habibi said of the U.S. government. He is among hundreds of American citizens and green card holders stranded in the Afghan capital.

Victoria Nuland, undersecretary of state for political affairs, would not address individual cases but said all U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents who could not get evacuation flights or were otherwise stranded had been contacted individually in the past 24 hours and told to expect further information about routes out once those have been arranged.

“We will communicate directly to them personalized instructions on what they should do, when they should do it, and how the United States government feels we are best positioned to help them do that," added State Department spokesman Ned Price.

For some of those who remain, however, the trauma of trying for nearly two weeks to get onto a U.S. plane is still harrowing.

Habibi, an electrician who has lived in Richmond since 2015 on a special immigration visa, had returned to Afghanistan for a visit on June 22 — the first time his family had been back since 2019. Their return flight was to have been Aug. 31.

About Aug. 18, Habibi said he got an email from the U.S. government saying that his family — all green card holders except for their youngest, who has a U.S. passport — would be evacuated. 

Subsequent emails said he should take his family to the airport. He obeyed, but the mad crush of people prevented him from getting near the gate on his first two attempts.

His daughter, Madina, who at 15 has flawless English and serves as the family spokesperson, said she and her younger sister were almost trampled at the airport. The family wrote back, “It's too dangerous. We can't go into the crowd,” she said.

The emails kept arriving, saying they should go to the airport, she said.

By Aug. 25, the emails had been replaced by phone calls from Arlington, Virginia, Madina said. The callers, who identified themselves as being from the U.S. Embassy, told the family to stay at home and that the government was aware of their location, she said, speaking for her father.

Habibi said he still made four or five more attempts, even recruiting friends and relatives to wade into the crowd with the family, forming a kind of protective cordon. The youngest of the four girls, Dunya, is 2 and was born in the U.S.

Habibi said that on at least two occasions, he got close enough to the gate that his passport was scanned but was refused entry. He shouted at the U.S. soldiers, waving his documents.

“What does this green card even mean? Nothing. They did nothing,” he said.

Madina, who spoke to most of the callers from Virginia, said she told them the family was from Richmond. Even as the evacuations came to an end, Madina said one caller promised, "We are going to get you out. You are not going to get stuck. Don't worry. We know where you are."

Habibi said they even pledged to pick them up in a car. 

“They lied. They did nothing," he said.

Habibi says he hasn't been threatened by the Taliban and that no one has bothered him but he is still afraid. News stories and horrifying posts on social media have him convinced that the Taliban will kill him, he said, although he admitted he doesn't know of anyone being targeted.

“I’m just afraid. I follow the news,” he said.

He said he knows of many families, some with U.S. green cards, who remain in Afghanistan.

Madina said Marcia Vigar Perez, a teacher at Dumbarton Elementary, her former school, started a prayer chain for her safe return.

“Every day they call me,” she said.

Another Afghan native who asked to be identified only as Ajmal, fearing retribution, said he, his two brothers and their families — 16 people in all — were granted emergency immigrant visas to be evacuated after another brother in Virginia submitted the paperwork.

Ajmal displayed emails from the U.S. government that said “please make your way to the Hamid Karzai International Airport" and use the Camp Sullivan Gate, not the civilian entrance, although he also was warned that the gate could change daily.

He said he and his relatives went to the airport, but heavy gunfire by the Taliban and the crush of thousands of people sent them back home. On one occasion, he said he received an email telling him and his family they would be picked up at a spot near the airport at 3 a.m. He and his family waited on the street until 9 a.m., but no one came, he said.

His brother Wais, a U.S. citizen living in Virginia, said he had petitioned senators and filled out paperwork to get his family to America.

“I am frustrated and angry" at U.S. officials, Wais said. “All the time they say, ‘We are working on it, we are working on it,' but then — nothing.”

Associated Press writer Matthew Lee in Washington contributed.

According to transcripts, neither leader discussed threat of an imminent Taliban takeover, but Biden had a message: 'perception' needed to improve.

The clandestine operation resulted in the successful evacuation of hundreds of American citizens and vulnerable Afghans.

"I was going to stay alive one way or another, even if I had to turn the sofa over on top of me," one resident said. "I was going to survive this."

Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), the chair of the House select committee in charge of investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, announced Thursday that he has named Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) as vice chair.Why it matters: Cheney, who was already the committee's top Republican, is now the panel's second-ranking member, an unusual move for a committee dominated by Democrats due to House GOP leadership's refusal to participate.Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with Axi

Ahmad Wali Massoud, an anti-Taliban resistance representative, believes a civil war in Afghanistan is "very likely" following failing peace talks with the Taliban.

Millions will be losing their pandemic-related and enhanced unemployment benefits over Labor Day weekend, as states opt to let them expire.

Stars Simu Liu, Awkwafina, Meng'er Zhang and Florian Munteanu talk Marvel's groundbreaking "Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings."

The U.S. military service members who were injured in the bombing at Hamid Karzai International Airport during the frantic evacuations last week are now all back in the United States, where they continue to be treated.

With Hurricane Ida's winds screaming and only a tent and tarp for shelter, Angelique Hebert clung to her husband under a bridge where the couple had sought refuge. Homeless and with few options in the bayous and small communities of southern Louisiana, they said they simply couldn’t afford to get out of Ida's path. Despite mandatory and voluntary evacuation orders in south Louisiana parishes, many residents who wanted to flee were left to fend for themselves as the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever hit the U.S. mainland ravaged Louisiana.

Visiting players will be exempt from the policies, per the report.

Abortion emerged as a front-burner issue in the Virginia governor’s race on Wednesday, as the impact of a new near-total ban on the practice in Texas reverberated in one of the year’s marquee political contests.

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A Florida man was accused Tuesday of trying to extort $25 million from Don Gaetz, the father of Rep. Matt Gaetz, in an alleged scheme linked to a federal sex trafficking investigation into the Republican congressman.Driving the news: The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Florida announced Tuesday that Stephen Alford was indicted by a federal grand jury over an alleged scheme "to obtain money based upon false promises or guarantees he made" to Don Gaetz that he "could deliver a

(Bloomberg) -- Italian coffee machine manufacturer De’ Longhi has hired Oscar-winning actor Brad Pitt as its new brand ambassador, the company said in a statement on Thursday.De’ Longhi’s shares rose close to the session high after the announcement and were up 1.9% at 39.48 euros as of 3:41 p.m. in Milan trading.The company, which makes specialty coffee and espresso machines as well as other appliances, picked the Hollywood star for the launch of its first international advertising campaign. Hom

The 26 girls, ages 14-16, are seen as advocates for female empowerment.

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Virtually nobody here wears a face mask on the street or inside shops and restaurants — a huge surprise. It’s almost as if the COVID-19 pandemic were a distant memory.

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and Rep. Dan Crenshaw were among those who falsely declared Tuesday that a video showed Taliban fighters flying an American helicopter and hanging someone from it. The New York Post was duped, too, but wasn’t quite as credulous. The Post wrote a story on the man suspended from the helicopter, but noted it was “not immediately clear exactly how he is attached or if he is alive.” In fact, he was alive. The video was posted from a now-suspended account, but another video of

TOLO News' Beheshta Arghand was the first female TV host to conduct a live sit-down interview with a Taliban leader, but she's since fled Afghanistan.

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CDC releases report on The Crossing COVID-19 outbreak

Belleville News-Democrat 01 September, 2021 - 02:51pm

A report, published Tuesday in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, states that on June 30 the Illinois Department of Public Health contacted the CDC concerning COVID-19 outbreaks at two events sponsored by The Crossing.

Of concern were a 5-day overnight church camp for teenagers in Schuyler County and a 2-day men’s conference at The Crossing campus in Quincy.

According to the CDC, neither COVID-19 vaccinations nor testing were required by The Crossing at either event.

The report sets the total number of confirmed outbreak-associated cases at 180 as of August 13. Although the report suggests that number is likely much higher than investigators can confirm.

The CDC said The Crossing would not provide health officials complete rosters of attendees and staff members. Officials stated that lack of cooperation by The Crossing resulted in limited research efforts and analyses hindering the ability to track the disease spread.

Of the 180 cases, the report identifies 122 primary cases, meaning they were identified as coming directly from the camp or conference. 87 of those were camp attendees, out of 335 total campers and staff members. The other 35 were conference attendees, out of 530 total conference participants and staff members.

Among 262 close contacts of camp or conference attendees, the report identifies 58 secondary cases. 48 of these were infected by household members, four by non-household family members, three by friends, and one each by a neighbor, at work, or during a Bible study group.

The report goes on to state that The Adams County Health Department alone reported a 648% increase in COVID-19 cases in the county following the camp with an average of 33.1 new cases per day.

In the 7 days before the camp (June 6–12), the Adams County Health Department reported 31 COVID-19 cases, with an average of 4.4 cases per day. In the 7 days after the last identified secondary case (July 16–22), the county reported 232 cases, with an average of 33.1 per day, a 648% increase from the number reported during the week before the camp.

The report also points out that cases were not limited to Adams County. The total exposure to COVID-19 resulting from both the camp and conference is 1,127 people across at least four states and 18 counties.

The report also determined the "attack rate" of the virus during the outbreak. The CDC said the attack rate is the risk of getting COVID-19 during the outbreak. The attack rate was 26% at the camp and 7% at the conference.

The report shows that of the 87 people with camp-associated cases, no one reported symptoms before the camp started on June 13.

However, of the 35 people with conference-associated cases, three reported being symptomatic during the conference, and one camp-associated staff member reported attending the conference while symptomatic.

The report shows among the 180 total positive cases, 13 required medical care in an emergency department and five were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. None of those vaccinated who tested positive were hospitalized and three sought care at an emergency department.

Of the 122 positive cases from the camp or conference, the report shows 18 were fully vaccinated. Those 18 reported a total of 38 close contacts; eight of which tested positive for COVID-19, four of those were fully vaccinated.

The report shows those who were unvaccinated or partially vaccinated and tested positive for COVID-19 reported a total of 244 close contacts. Of those, 50 tested positive for COVID-19, including seven fully vaccinated persons.

According to the CDC, the camp was held from June 13 through June 17 and included ages 14 through 18 with attendees being from across Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri.

The report states a total of 294 campers arrived on buses or large passenger vans and were met by 41 staff members.

No proof of COVID-19 vaccination, pre-testing or testing on arrival was required, and the list of suggested items to bring to camp did not include masks, researchers said.

According to the report, campers were housed in large, shared boarding facilities of approximately 100 campers each, dined in a cafeteria together, participated in indoor and outdoor small group activities in which campers were with the same people during program events, and participated in activities with all campers during all 5 days.

On June 16, the second to last camp day, the report states, one camper left after becoming ill with a fever and respiratory symptoms. He later tested positive for COVID-19.

Campers and staff members were then notified and encouraged to get tested and instructed to quarantine per CDC guidance.

The report states that six camp staff members who received positive COVID-19 test results also attended the conference from June 18 through June 19, but did not receive their results until after the conference ended.

According to the report, all six staff members showed symptoms from June 17 through June 29.

The conference was held at The Crossing Church in Quincy and included 500 attendees and 30 staff members, and, as with the camp, no COVID-19 vaccinations, testing, or masking was required.

The first case in a conference attendee was diagnosed on June 21, 2 days after the conference.

Conference attendees and staff members were then notified, encouraged to get tested, and instructed to quarantine per CDC guidance.

Leadership at The Crossing declined an interview request by WGEM News.

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