All Three 'Fear Street' Soundtracks Getting Vinyl Release With Cover Art Inspired by the Original Books!

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Bloody Disgusting 16 July, 2021 - 01:54pm 11 views

What time is fear street release?

There is good news for 'Fear Street' fans, as the next movie is coming out very soon. It is scheduled for release on July 16, which is this Friday. More specifically, it is scheduled to hit Netflix accounts at 12:01 PT or 03:01 ET, for those in the United States. MARCA.comFear Street Part 3 1666: Release date, plot and cast on Netflix

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With the entire trilogy now streaming on Netflix, Waxwork Records has announced today that the soundtracks for all three Fear Street movies are being released on vinyl.

Coolest of all, the art for each film pays tribute to the classic illustrations found on the covers of R.L. Stine‘s original books, which Leigh Janiak‘s movies are of course based on.

Writer in the horror community since 2008. Owns Eli Roth's prop corpse from Piranha 3D. Has three awesome cats. Still plays with toys.

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I’m going to cram the new King Woman record down your throat because, well, it’s an album of the year contender. Celestial Blues, out July 30th via Relapse Records, is quite simply perfection.

Singer Kristina Esfandiari turns in an epic concept album that spins the epic poem “Paradise Lost” on its head. Debut track “Morning Star” is a god damn near-masterpiece and the blood-soaked Bathory-inspired madness of “Psychic Wound” gave us a taste of just how intense the forthcoming release can get.

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And then there’s Andrew W.K., who has also just released his third single off God Is Partying, out September 10, 2021, through Napalm Records. Pre-order the album here.

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”When we started working on the video for ‘Everybody Sins’, the director and I were scheming and straining over some of the choreography and camera moves,” said Andrew W.K. in a statement. “Now, I do realize some people will say life’s too short to scheme and strain like this. And others will say life’s too short NOT to scheme and strain. Still, other people will say both these approaches are incorrect. And what do I say? Everything I just said in the video for ‘Everybody Sins’.”

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Fear Street: 1666 sticks the landing on Netflix’s horror trilogy

Polygon 16 July, 2021 - 11:50am

A period horror capstone brings the series full circle

The third and final film in Leigh Janiak’s Fear Street series, adapted from R.L. Stine’s books, skews the farthest from the established genre conventions of the former two installments. The excessive period-specific needle drops are replaced by a bucolic violin score. (At least at first.) Fear Street: 1994 and Fear Street: 1978 relied heavily on tropes and iconography borrowed from the popular horror films and franchises of their respective eras, from Scream to Friday the 13th and Halloween. Fear Street: 1666 has no such referents, but its visual aesthetic and tone do match up with other period horror films, like Gareth Evans’ Apostle or Robert Eggers’ The Witch. The town of Union, the 17th-century predecessor to modern-day Shadyside, is a picture of communal bliss. Farmers tend to their flocks, children frolic and recite nursery rhymes, and teenagers finish their chores before running off to indulge in the fruits of the land and their youth. At first glance, it’s not clear that this place would be the origin site of a centuries-long curse and a legacy of inexplicable violence. But every horror story begins somewhere.

The horror of Fear Street: 1666 isn’t rooted in any one homicidal killer, though Pastor Cyrus Miller (Michael Chandler) certainly fulfills that role in an especially chilling scene. Mostly, though, it finds its tragic terror in the way the most vulnerable individuals — queer women, in this case — are transformed into pariahs by communities who grasp for reassurances in times of crisis by ostracizing those who can’t fight back. The scene of Sarah’s execution by hanging is heart-wrenching, made all the more so by the revelation of who actually originated the so-called witch’s curse — someone else whose legacy looms like a shadow over Shadyside and Sunnyvale, in the form of their descendants.

Beneath the surface, however, the commonalities between the three films offer candid commentary on the arbitrariness of class, the adolescent fear of growing up and falling into the mold of a life set before you, and the importance of defiantly claiming one’s own worth and happiness in the face of uncertainty or social reprisal. These movies certainly aren’t profound, but the Fear Street trilogy is an admirable, entertaining horror series packed with enough gruesome scares, clever twists, and charming performances to compel audiences until the end.

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