ASRock Announces Windows 11 Compatible Motherboards

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guru3d.com 06 July, 2021 - 02:11am 17 views

ASRock announced what motherboards will be compatible with Microsoft's next OS, Windows 11

Although a TPM 2.0 function is required to upgrade "Windows 11", by enabling the firmware TPM 2.0 function, it can be handled without the need for a physical module. In the BIOS setting items, it is necessary to enable "Intel Platform Trust Technology" on the Intel platform and select "AMD CPU fTPM" on the "AMD fTPM switch" on the AMD platform.

The firmware TPM 2.0 function is supported by motherboards equipped with Intel X299 / 500/400/300/200/100 series and AMD TRX 40/500/400/300 series chipsets. Please refer to the link for detailed compatible chipsets and setting methods.

Read full article at guru3d.com

Upgrading your PC’s hardware for Windows 11

Computerworld 06 July, 2021 - 06:42pm

I’m both a cheap geek and a realistic one. There are some hardware upgrades that I will gladly do — upgrades such as ensuring that all hard drives in any computer I have are SSDs rather than IDE hard drives. Especially with Windows 10, it’s a no-brainer: an SSD makes any wheezy computer snappier.

I’ve even upgraded a server to include a TPM module. Typically the hard part is finding the right part that you need and then finding a picture (or ideally a video) showing exactly where the TPM module is plugged into the motherboard.

But upgrading a processor?  That’s where I draw the line. I have slathered on too much CPU thermal paste to feel comfortable in taking an existing processor out of a computer and upgrading it.

So why am I worrying about upgrading hardware? Because of the recommended hardware mandated with the upcoming Windows 11 rollout near the end of the year — requirements that include a 64-bit processor with 2+ cores and a speed of at least 1GHz, as well as a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0.

To be clear, Windows 10 will be supported with updates until 2025, so there is no need to panic now. Rather, it’s a time to determine which computers can be updated to Windows 11 when it comes out at the end of the year and which ones should be left at Windows 10.

But let’s start with the basics. You may need to do some research on your computer or motherboard to see if it shipped with a TPM chip or can support it. Start by clicking in the Windows search box and typing in tpm.msc. If you have a TPM chip on the motherboard and it’s enabled in the bios, then the resulting screen will show you if you have TPM 1.2 or 2.0. Updating your computer to support TPM 2 may be only a boot away, or it may be more complicated.

But first you have to ask yourself if you’ve encrypted your hard drive with a third-party encryption tool or with BitLocker. If you have, you’ll have to unencrypt the hard drive and re-encrypt it after the firmware upgrading process. This may take time. Going by my experience with unencrypting a BitLockered drive, be prepared to start it overnight and wait until the process has fully completed.

On my Lenovo ThinkPad laptop, I was able to easily flip from TPM 1.2 to 2.0 by booting into the bios, finding the section in the bios settings — usually in security — and then changing the setting from TPM 1.2 to 2.0. A sample video on the process can be found on YouTube. For my HP desktop at the office, the process was a bit more complicated, as I had to find the exact firmware update to upgrade the computer from TPM 1.2 to 2.0. I originally attempted to use HP’s TPM Configuration Utility but found a more exact match for my motherboard by reading this HP support document. For Dell, you can follow the company’s documentation or YouTube video. If it’s been done successfully, your TPM module will now indicate that you’ve upgraded from 1.2 to 2.0.

But now you will find that the real block in running Windows 11 successfully is not the TPM chip — even though that is important — but the processor. Unless you already have an Intel Generation 8 (or equivalent in the AMD family) or unless Microsoft backs down on its processor requirements, you won’t be able to run Windows 11.

Researching my computers and which Intel chipset they run on made me realize that some of my Core i5-based PCs are older than I had remembered. While I was a bit concerned that so many computers I control won’t be able to upgrade to Windows 11 with their current processors, it was a useful wakeup call to the fact that I have a lot of older equipment in my fleet.

While you can upgrade a processor after researching which ones your existing motherboard can support, the ease of doing so will depend on the kind of computer you have. I’ve found that if I’ve built a computer from scratch, buying the motherboard, the graphics card, the processor, and the case separately, I can often find a newer processor that the motherboard will support, or I can opt to upgrade the motherboard as well. In the good old days that usually meant a trip to Fry’s Electronics, but those days are over now that Fry’s has gone out of business. Nowadays upgrading is a bit harder, especially in cases where I’ve purchased refurbished business desktop machines rather than starting from scratch.

The only computer I have that will support Windows 11 is my recently purchased Surface Pro 7. But whenever I purchase Surface devices these days, I don’t purchase them up front. Instead I sign up for the Surface All Access for Business plan that allows me to purchase them over time for 0% interest, and then when I get near the end of the term, I can turn in the device and get a newer one. Because Surface devices are extremely hard to open and service (I never have managed to pry open the Surface RT from years ago that had a battery die and was never able to be charged up again), I look to ways that allow me to swap them out for new equipment after several years. While this program is set up for businesses only, other computer vendors may provide similar offerings for lightweight laptops that cannot be easily upgraded.

Of course, you’ll probably ask me if you really need to upgrade to Windows 11. If you think your computer has four more years of good, solid life in it, then the answer is no. Windows 10 will be fully supported for the next four years, and knowing Microsoft, if enough of us are still running Windows 10 at the end of these four years (we will, trust me), then the company will come up with some sort of extended patching program.

Bottom line: evaluate your computers. See which ones can make the cut for Windows 11, and those that can’t. And then relax, because Microsoft has just started the beta process for Windows 11, and  Windows 10 has a lot of life still left in it.

If you have any lingering questions, we’ve got plenty of answers over at Askwoody.com and here on Computerworld.

Copyright © 2021 IDG Communications, Inc.

Copyright © 2021 IDG Communications, Inc.

Asus, Gigabyte, MSI and others publish a list of hardware that will support Windows 11

Neowin 06 July, 2021 - 06:42pm

Major hardware manufacturers including Asus, Gigabyte and MSI have published a list of hardware that will be compatible with Windows 11. The list includes pre-built systems as well as motherboards that will support Windows 11 at launch.

Last month, Microsoft officially announced the Windows 11 operating system. Along with a visual overhaul, Windows 11 also increased the minimum system requirements and also made it mandatory for systems to support TPM as well as Secure Boot. Apart from that, Microsoft has also published a list of CPUs that will support Windows 11 at launch.

Currently, Microsoft is trying to clear the air and other manufacturers are now helping out by publishing a list of hardware that will support Windows 11. To start off, Asus has published two lists- one for their pre-builts, laptops, AiO and the other for their motherboards. Apart from that, the company has also published a handy guide on how to enable TPM on Asus motherboards. Essentially, all the recent motherboards as well as laptops support TPM and will support Windows 11 as well.

Gigabyte, on the other hand, has confirmed that all the motherboards including AMD TRX40, 300, Intel X299, C621, C232, C236 and more are TPM 2.0 ready and will pass Windows's verification check. Unfortunately, the company has not published a list of laptops and desktop that will support Windows 11.

AsRock has published two different forum posts confirming support for Intel as well as AMD motherboards. Biostar, on the other hand, has shared a list of motherboards that are TPM ready and will support Windows 11 at launch.

Lastly, MSI has given a list of desktops as well as AiOs that will support Windows 11 at launch. The company has also published a separate post on Reddit confirming the list of motherboards that officially support Windows 11. Do note that MSI labels TPM as "Security Device Support" in the BIOS so you will need to enable that in order for TPM to work. Unfortunately, there is no mention about MSI laptops.

For more information on the topic, you can check out our article on minimum system requirements as well as the list of CPUs that support Windows 11. Apart from the general requirements, Microsoft has also listed out specific feature requirements for Windows 11 including webcams, Bluetooth and Precision Touchpad on all upcoming laptops. Last month, Microsoft also updated the PC Health Check app to show why a device is not ineligible to receive the Windows 11 update. However, the company will allow some manufacturers to bypass the TPM 2.0 requirement and it is also allowing Windows Insiders with unsupported hardware to test Windows 11 Insider Builds. According to a tweet from Windows's Twitter account, Microsoft is planning to roll out Windows 11 to eligible Windows 10 users in 2022.

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All the Motherboards That Support TPM for Windows 11 | Digital Trends

Digital Trends 06 July, 2021 - 05:13pm

Now, major motherboard companies have finally come out with guidance on which boards come with the feature.

Asus, ASRock, Biostar, Gigabyte, and MSI are among the first motherboard makers to round up all of the chipsets that support TPM. Instead of a dedicated module, the TPM firmware uses power from the CPU for processing. This is enabled by Intel Platform Trust Technology (PTT), which is available on most consumer motherboards. It offers the same capabilities of discrete TPM, just without a dedicated module.

Although all of the chipsets below support firmware TPM, that doesn’t mean they all support Windows 11. Currently, CPU support only goes back to AMD Ryzen 2000 and Intel 8th-gen, but Microsoft says it’s testing older chips for support. Make sure to consult the list of supported AMD processors and supported Intel processors before upgrading.

As long as you have a supported system, you can download the Windows 11 Insider preview to see what the upcoming operating system has in store.

Asus includes support for firmware TPM on the most recent AMD chipsets and Intel chipsets dating back several years.

To activate it on Intel motherboards, head to the BIOS, go to the Advanced tab, select Advanced\PCH-FW Configuration and change PTT to Enable. 

AMD motherboards follow the same process but with different names. Look for Advanced\AMD fTPM Configuration in the Advanced tab, and switch the TPM Device Selection setting to Firmware TPM. 

ASRock supports firmware TPM on most Intel and AMD motherboards, but it’s important to check if you have a compatible processor. Although firmware TPM may work on Intel 100-series chipsets, for example, that doesn’t mean your CPU will work with Windows 11.

On Intel boards, go to the BIOS and select the Security tab to enable TPM. Find the Intel Platform Trust Technology setting in this section and change it to Enabled. 

If you have an AMD board, go to the Advanced tab and find the AMD fTPM Switch setting. Change this setting to AMD CPU fTPM. 

Biostar supports firmware TPM on a few Intel and AMD chipsets. The company hasn’t provided any guidance on how to enable TPM in the BIOS, but the process should be similar to the brands above. Look for a Security or Advanced tab, where you should find a setting for TPM or Intel PTT.

Gigabyte motherboards with the latest AMD and Intel chipsets support firmware TPM. As with Biostar, Gigabyte hasn’t provided any guidance on enabling the feature, but you will likely find it in the Settings menu with a reference to TPM or Intel PTT.

MSI supports firmware TPM on the last several AMD and Intel chipsets. Similar to ASRock, the list below compromises chipsets that support TPM 2.0, not chipsets that support Windows 11. Make sure to check your processor against the list of officially supported ones.

To enable TPM on Intel boards, go to the BIOS and select the Settings menu. Then, follow Security > Trusted Computing and change the TPM Device Selection setting to PTT. 

For AMD, go to the BIOS and select the Security tab, then turn on Security Device Support and select AMD fTPM Switch. 

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Try this fix if you get "This pc can't run Windows 11" during setup - gHacks Tech News

Ghacks Technology News 06 July, 2021 - 12:55pm

The requirements have not been changed, and you may use third-party tools to check if your device is compatible with Windows 11.

Not all is lost if the device is not compatible, especially if TPM is the component. It may take just a flip of a switch in the bios of the system to make it compatible in that case, if the processor supports firmware-based TPM. Both Intel and AMD support this, and you may find options to enable the Intel Platform Trust Technology or the AMD Platform Security Processor in the BIOS to enable the feature and make the device compatible with Windows 11.

There is still a chance if TPM 2.0 is not support on the device. If you do get "This PC can't run Windows 11" during setup, or ran one of the compatibility checkers and discovered that TPM was the issue, then you may enforce compatibility by disabling some compatibility checks during setup.

Here is how that is done:

Several Windows features require TPM, and these may not work at all or only partially if TPM is not available.

The method may not work in all cases, but it is worth a try if you are stuck during setup and know that the reason for being stuck is TPM, RAM or secure boot.

Now You: Did you run the compatible check? Is your PC compatible with Windows 11? (via Bleeping Computer)

Ghacks is a technology news blog that was founded in 2005 by Martin Brinkmann. It has since then become one of the most popular tech news sites on the Internet with five authors and regular contributions from freelance writers.

Asus, Gigabyte, and more reveal devices that support Windows 11 requirements

Laptop Mag 06 July, 2021 - 08:32am

Check if your laptop will support Microsoft's Windows 11

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All these ASRock motherboards will work with Windows 11

Windows Central 06 July, 2021 - 07:28am

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When Microsoft announced Windows 11, some confusion emerged regarding its minimum requirements. The fact that systems need to support TPM 2.0 created confusion, as many motherboards don't need a hardware module to meet the requirement. ASRock aims to clear things up with a new FAQ post.

ASRock explains how many of its motherboards can meet the TPM 2.0 requirement without having a TPM 2.0 hardware module. When asked if a TPM 2.0 module is required, ASRock explains,

No, please [enable] [Intel Platform Trust Technology (Intel PTT)] or [AMD CPU fTPM] feature under UEFI BIOS. It supports the TPM2.0 feature without TPM2.0 hardware module.

This isn't exclusive to ASRock, as many of the best motherboards that don't have the hardware module can use firmware to meet the TPM 2.0 requirement.

ASRock also shared lists of supported platforms, including the ASRock Taichi Z490. Here are the supported Intel chipsets:

ASRock notes that the actual support for the Intel 100 and 200 series may vary based on the official release of Windows 11.

Here are the supported AMD chipsets from ASRock:

Actual support of the AM4 300 and 400 series may vary based on the official release of Windows 11, according to ASRock.

The FAQ page also explains how to enable TPM 2.0 through a system's BIOS. If you have questions about TPM and Windows 11, our executive editor Daniel Rubino recently explained why TPM is important.

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ASRock Unveils Windows 11 Compatible Motherboards

Wccftech 05 July, 2021 - 02:18pm

Today, ASRock has disclosed their AMD and Intel motherboards that are compatible with Microsoft's new Windows 11 operating system. It has been reported that TPM 2.0, or Trusted Platform Module Version 2.0, is necessary for it to be enabled for Windows 11 to work properly. If you do not have the TPM hardware module on your current motherboard, the verification for TPM 2.0 can be utilized through accessing either fTPM on AMD's series of motherboards, or PTT on Intel's series, both located in the BIOS.

Wccftech recommends checking your system first for compatibility before making any changes to your operating system so you do not lose important data.

ASRock instructs AMD motherboard consumers to enable fTPM per these instructions.

Method to Enable fTPM in BIOS

ASRock instructs Intel motherboard consumers to enable PTT per these instructions.

We previously reported the listings of ASUS, MSI and Gigabyte motherboards that will be compatible with Microsoft Windows 11. With a Q3 release expected for Windows 11, we expect more manufacturers to release their list of compatible motherboards for the upcoming operating system.

Windows 11 has all the power and security of Windows 10 with a redesigned and refreshed look. It also comes with new tools, sounds, and apps. Every detail has been considered. All of it comes together to bring you a refreshing experience on your PC.

From what we have seen, Microsoft stands to create a brand new way of using your Windows 11  enabled PCs. Keep checking back with Wccftech for updated information as it is gathered.

Source: VideoCardz, Microsoft [1,2], ASRock

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ASUS, MSI, and Gigabyte list which devices will work with Windows 11

Windows Central 05 July, 2021 - 11:25am

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With Windows 11 on the way, many people want to know if their PC will be able to upgrade to the new operating system. Controversial minimum requirements for Windows 11 and a confusing PC Health Check app that has since been pulled didn't clear up confusion for PC owners. To help clear things up, manufacturers are sharing lists of devices that will get Windows 11 later this year and into 2022. Dell, HP, and Acer shared lists last month, and now ASUS, Gigabyte, and MSI have done the same (via Neowin).

ASUS has an extensive list of devices that will be able to upgrade to Windows 11. It contains hundreds of PCs, so we won't list them all here. Devices from ASUS' Zenbook, Zenbook Flip, Zephyrus, ASUS TUF, ROG Strix, Zen AiO, and ExpertBook lines will all be able to upgrade to the new operating system. Several other types of PCs will also be able to upgrade.

ASUS also has a separate list of motherboards that will support Windows 11.

Gigabyte explains in a press release that several of its motherboards will work with Windows 11. Motherboards have caused quite a bit of confusion due to the TPM 2.0 requirement of Windows 11. Gigabyte addresses this concern (emphasis added):

In fact, TPM 2.0 hardware is not a must to pass TPM 2.0 verification ... Lots of GIGABYTE Intel and AMD motherboards can pass the TPM 2.0 verification of the Windows 11 by simply enabling the TPM-related function in the BIOS, on which Intel X299, B250 chipset and above platform will be the Platform Trust Technology (PTT), and fTPM function on the AMD AM4 and TRX40 motherboards. By this advanced BIOS setting, GIGABYTE motherboards can pass the TPM 2.0 verification of Windows 11 to prevent TPM 2.0 support becoming an issue to users during their system upgrade.

MSI shared a list of desktops and all-in-one PCs that will be able to upgrade to Windows 11. Devices from the company's Infinite, Codex, Trident, Aegis, and PRO all-in-one lineups are among the supported devices. A Reddit post from MSI also lists which of its motherboards will support Windows 11.

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If your PC somehow does not have trusted platform module (TPM) support through firmware and your UEFI BIOS, we'd recommend checking your motherboard manual for a TPM header. If you have one present, you can try to see if one of these will be compatible to get you ready for Windows 11.

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We’re starting to learn more about which PCs are compatible with Windows 11

TechRadar 05 July, 2021 - 04:28am

Here’s which Asus, Biostar and Gigabyte motherboards are compatible (thus far)

To be precise, Asus, Biostar and Gigabyte have announced a list of currently compatible motherboards, although before PCs running these components are good to go with Windows 11, they may need a touch of tweaking in the BIOS. More about that in a moment, but first let’s list the compatible boards, as highlighted by Tom’s Hardware and Wccftech.

Note that these aren’t necessarily the finalized lists of supported hardware for Windows 11, and other motherboard ranges will be added – this is just the state of play as it currently stands, so don’t despair yet if your particular board isn’t listed above.

As mentioned, those motherboards are fine with Windows 11, but may still require a trip to the BIOS to flick a switch to enable TPM (Trusted Platform Module) support. As Tom’s Hardware spotted, Gigabyte observed: “Lots of Gigabyte Intel and AMD motherboards can pass the TPM 2.0 verification of the Windows 11 by simply enabling the TPM-related function in the BIOS. By this advanced BIOS setting, Gigabyte motherboards can pass the TPM 2.0 verification of Windows 11 to prevent TPM 2.0 support becoming an issue to users during their system upgrade.”

Predictably, given these requirements there has been a good deal of confusion around compatibility with Windows 11, a situation that hasn’t been helped by the fact that Microsoft’s PC Health Check app – the utility which lets you know whether your PC is compatible with the incoming OS – has in some cases been giving out errant information (with the tool’s findings lacking in details, too).

Remember that you also need a compatible CPU for Windows 11 as well, plus there are other minimum system requirements.

Darren is a freelancer writing news and features for TechRadar (and occasionally T3) across a broad range of computing topics including CPUs, GPUs, various other hardware, VPNs, antivirus and more. He has written about tech for the best part of three decades, and writes books in his spare time (his debut novel - 'I Know What You Did Last Supper' - was published by Hachette UK in 2013).

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