Aurora police violate laws, use excessive force and racially biased practices, according to state report

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The Denver Channel 15 September, 2021 - 08:38pm 51 views

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DENVER – The Aurora Police Department uses excessive force and racially biased police practices and violates state and federal laws as part of its patterns and practices, according to a 14-month investigation by the Colorado Department of Law whose results were released on Wednesday by Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser.

The Department of Law is recommending the city enter into a consent decree to change its policies, training, record keeping and hiring practices and will require the city to pay an independent monitor to update its progress to courts and the public on how it is implementing changes. Weiser said at a news conference if the city does not cooperate, his office will seek a court order to implement the consent decree.

The Department of Law and city of Aurora will have 60 days to come to an agreement on the consent decree.

“This is going to involve a back and forth, not just with the city, but with experts and with community member,” Weiser said Wednesday regarding the next steps in the process. “We recognize the significance in this document. So, we haven't done this by ourselves, the law calls for it to be a collaborative process and that's the way we're developing.”

Weiser said Aurora police showed a “consistent pattern of illegal behavior” at “many levels of the department.” According to his office, the department “does not create and oversee appropriate expectations for responsible behavior, which leads to the use of excessive force and the violation of the civil rights of its residents.”

“We want Aurora to succeed in these improvements and strongly believe that an agreement provides the best way to do so,” Weiser said in a statement. “Over the coming weeks, we look forward to working with Aurora and other stakeholders to create a consent decree that ensures these requirements are implemented promptly.”

The report found police officers used force against people of color 2 ½ times more often than white people based on population and that almost half of people who had forced used against them by officers were Black, even though only 15% of Aurora residents are Black.

It also found people of color were arrested 1.3 times more often than white people based on population, and Black people were more than twice as likely to be arrested as white people.

Weiser said that APD officers have regularly applied greater force than is reasonably warranted in situations, including taking people to the ground without giving them time to respond to officers and telling people to stop resisting when they were not in fact resisting officers.

He said Aurora officers had a “misplaced understanding” of de-escalation and focused more on calming down officers after using force rather than avoiding unnecessary escalation in the first place.

“We observed officers immediately escalating situations and circumstances in which the subject was in obvious mental health distress but did not present a risk to themselves or others,” Weiser said.

“These actions are unacceptable,” the attorney general said. “They hurt the people that law enforcement is entrusted to protect, and they destroyed community trust.”

Weiser announced in August 2020 that his office had been conducting the patterns and practices investigation into Aurora’s police and fire departments and instances in which officers might have deprived people of their constitutional rights.

The investigation was made possible after lawmakers passed, and Gov. Jared Polis, signed SB20-217, the sweeping police reform bill that was authored in the wake of the deaths of George Floyd and Elijah McClain. The investigation was the first state patterns and practices probe, Weiser said.

“The pattern or practice authority, as it’s known, is a tool the federal government has had for some time, but Colorado became a national leader by providing our department with the ability to engage in such investigations on a state level,” Weiser said Wednesday.

Rep. Leslie Herod, D-Denver, was one of the prime sponsors of the law and said Wednesday the patterns and practices investigation portion of the law “is doing exactly what it’s supposed to be doing.” She said it was the first of its kind in the nation and has “affirmed what citizens of Aurora and many other folks already knew – that the Aurora Police Department has operated in a way that is racist and is particularly racist against Black people.”

She said that the culture within the city of Aurora public safety departments “is dangerous for all citizens” and called for the city to work with the police department and with Colorado “to make immediate changes and rectify the past,” adding that she hoped people who have been victimized by Aurora officers in the past feel vindicated by the report.

“Racial discrimination in the community is real and the state will support and protect against that moving forward,” Herod said.

Mari Newman, who represents Lawayne Mosley, McClain’s father, reiterated that the law did what it was intended to do and said she was not surprised by what the report uncovered. She has sued the Aurora Police Department over excessive force and civil rights violations in the past.

“We hope this is just the beginning of what this law can do,” she said. “We hope other departments won’t wait for an investigation but will step back and say, ‘How do we change our practices?’ This can serve as a model across the country.”

The report released Monday said Aurora has also not updated practices it is required to update under that law, including documenting police interactions with members of the public.

It also finds that the Aurora Civil Service Commission, which has been heavily criticized in recent reporting by Denver7 Investigates because it hires officers without input from the police department itself, “overturns disciplinary actions in high-profile cases in a way that undermines the chief’s authority,” according to the attorney general’s office.

“Some of these changes are directly related to practices that violate the law,” Weiser said. “Other changes focus on culture, leadership and structural reforms that address and will prevent illegal conduct.”

The report found just 1.1% of Black applicants to the APD were offered a job compared to 4.2% of white applicants – which the attorney general’s office called “racial winnowing” that “can be observed at every step of the process, suggesting bias in Aurora’s recruitment and hiring process.”

McClain died after he was detained by Aurora police on Aug. 24, 2019. The 23-year-old unarmed Black man was put in a carotid hold and paramedics injected him with ketamine after incorrectly estimating his weight.

He went into cardiac arrest before dying a few days later.

The results of the investigation released Wednesday found Aurora Fire paramedics administered ketamine 22 times for so-called “excited delirium” between January 2019 and June 2020, but that they failed to follow proper monitoring protocols and administered it at levels above the maximum dose in more than half those incidents.

Aurora has suspended the use of ketamine and does not plan on reinstating its use, officials have said.

In statements issued Wednesday afternoon, Aurora City Manager Jim Twombly, Police Chief Vanessa Wilson and Fire Chief Fernando Gray said they appreciated the work from the attorney general’s office and would be reviewing the report and considering the parameters of the consent decree.

“I am still digesting the details of the Attorney General’s report, and it is painful to hear. It would be premature for me to comment on any specific findings at this time; however, the findings appear to align with the findings and recommendations presented from independent reviews the city commissioned more than a year ago, prior to the Attorney General’s review, and presented over the past several months – from Jonathan Smith and his team, 21CP Solutions and the Community Police Task Force,” Twombly said, in part. “Each recommendation and finding is valuable in helping us strengthen the ‘New Way’ of policing – and serving our community – that we are already implementing.

“In the coming weeks, we will work with the Attorney General’s Office to determine how to implement necessary and sustainable changes. The final consent decree will serve as another resource in our path forward,” Wilson said. “Today is incredibly difficult for not only the Aurora community but this agency. We acknowledge there are changes to be made. We will not broad brush this agency or discount the professionalism and integrity that individual officers bring to our community every day.”

“Aurora Fire Rescue committed to fully cooperating with the Attorney General’s Office during their review. This included providing access to our individual firefighters, crews and any and all EMS report data that was requested,” Gray said. “The primary issue identified by the Attorney General for our department was related to the use of ketamine. Although this medication was removed from our system more than a year ago and we have no plans to reintroduce this medication into our system, we find value in the report.”

Aurora Mayor Mike Coffman, like other city officials, pointed to the reforms already underway within the police and fire departments.

“Today the Attorney General released the findings of his team's investigation into Aurora Police and Fire. Most of the findings are not new and our Chiefs of Police and Fire Rescue have been working hard for over a year to address many of them,” Coffman said in a statement posted to Facebook. “I'm confident that the issues raised in the Attorney General's report, along with the other outside investigations commissioned by our city, will be corrected and that we will achieve an outcome that respects the rights of everyone who lives and works in our diverse community.”

Aurora City Councilman Juan Marcano said he believes the Aurora community is “done with performative changes.”

“This is the moment, with our community’s involvement, to really reimagine public safety. And again, it goes beyond policing in Aurora,” he said. “And if we fail to act then I expect them to hold us accountable at this coming election and the next one until they actually get the council and the city they deserve.”

McClain’s death led to the passage of HB21-1251 ("Appropriate Use Of Chemical Restraints On A Person") by Colorado lawmakers, which severely restricts when and how ketamine and other chemical restraints can be used by paramedics ahead of bringing a person to a hospital.

"I can't understate the impact of Elijah McClain's death has had on Colorado and Coloradans," Herod said Wednesday. "Had it not been for his murder and the fight of his mother, I don't think we would necessarily be here in the same place today."

She said the protests in Colorado that led to the investigations into McClain's death spurred what has come in the year-plus since.

"It's important to say to the protesters that what you suffered is real, is unjust, and should not happen in Aurora, Colorado or in this country," she said. "Your sacrifice was not in vain and has led us here today. for everyone who stood up for Elijah and other survivors, we're making changes."

The attorney general’s office had said little about the patterns and practices investigation since it was announced on the same day that McClain’s family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Aurora and the officers and paramedics involved in the 23-year-old’s death in August 2019. That lawsuit is still pending, according to court records.

The attorney general’s office said investigators with the Department of Law talked with current and former officers and AFD members and went on more than 200 hours of ridealongs. Investigators also attended meetings and reviewed use-of-force reports, according to Weiser’s office.

Weiser said the city of Aurora and the chiefs of its police and fire departments “cooperated fully” with the investigation and gave investigators “complete access” to the agencies.

On Sept. 1, Weiser announced a grand jury had returned a 32-count indictment against the three officers and two paramedics involved in McClain’s death, including manslaughter and criminal negligent homicide charges. Sheneen McClain said she was overwhelmed and cried when she learned about the indictment and thanked Weiser and his team.

Sheneen McClain said in an interview Wednesday she was disappointed it took the murder of her son to highlight the problems in Aurora.

“I feel hurt. The police never should have been allowed to get away with the murder of my son for two years,” she said. “…I feel like there’s so much wrong in Aurora, Colorado, they don’t even know how to help themselves.”

She said she is hopeful that no more people will have to die at the hands of police and “that there’s going to be a lot of change in Colorado for Elijah’s legacy.”

McClain says she believes ketamine should be banned for use by paramedics, something Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., is working on in Washington. “It shouldn’t be in the hands of anyone outside of the hospital,” she said.

McClain added that she believes the city needs to enter the consent decree and follow recommendations from the state that are made.

“I really believe that they need to follow the pattern and practice, and they shouldn’t come up against it at all,” she said. “They should do everything they can to make sure that nobody else loses their life because of racially motivated incidents like this. And I believe Mike Coffman needs to reach out or stop saying my son’s name. … I grew up here; I was born here; and I’m really disappointed in all the laws that have been allowing inhumane humans to run amok in our streets.”

"Phil Weiser confirmed what the rest of us in the civil rights community know — that Aurora has had a longstanding practice of police violence and bias police," said McClain's attorney, Qusair Mohamedbhai.

The patterns and practices investigation is one of at least five at the local, state and federal levels conducted in the wake of McClain’s death either into that incident or into Aurora public service departments.

A team of independent investigators in February released the results of their review of the investigation following McClain’s death, which they found was “flawed” and “failed to meaningfully develop a fulsome record”

The investigators were tasked not with assessing misconduct during the investigation but rather to report back on recommendations that could be learned from it.

Earlier this month, another independent investigation that analyzed the policies and practices within the police department, which was conducted by 21CP Solutions, who was tapped by the city, found a small share of officers were responsible for 40% of officer misconduct cases and that there was too much red tape for discipline of officers to be effective.

In June 2020, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil rights Division, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Denver Division confirmed they were looking at the McClain case for possible civil rights violations that may have occurred. No results of that investigation have been announced thus far.

“This report we're issuing is interdisciplinary in the finest sense, bringing together professionals from different backgrounds including law enforcement, prosecutors, former Deputy Assistant Attorney General at the United States Department of Justice to Civil Rights Division, a former United States Attorney who also worked as a trial attorney in the US DOJ Civil Rights Division, and many more,” Weiser said at Wednesday’s news conference.

“This project, in short, exemplifies one of our department's core values, which is to be better together, bringing people together to work on important issues. On behalf of the people of Colorado, I'm proud of how well this team worked together in a creative and collaborative fashion, both across our department, and with outside experts.”

Herod said she believed the report and subsequent action on the consent decree "will result in change for Colorado."

"These findings demonstrate the need for those policy changes," she said, "but there is still so much work left to do to keep our communities safe in Colorado."

The Aurora legislative delegation — Sens. Rhonda Fields and Janet Buckner, and Reps. Dominique Jackson, Naquetta Ricks, Iman Jodeh, Mike Weissman and Dafna Michaelson Jenet — issued a joint statement Wednesday lauding the report and the law passed last year.

“Today’s report is a glaring picture of how the Aurora Police Department operates, and gives us a full understanding of the gaps that must be filled in order to protect vulnerable families from racist, violent and inhumane practices within the Department,” they said. “…We will no longer tolerate bad actors going unchecked and this report, though disturbing, serves as a path toward dismantling systemic racism and bias within an institution that has lost the trust of our communities.”

“Today’s findings laid bare what many in our community know too well: that people of color are often treated differently by law enforcement and subject to abuse. I commend the Colorado Attorney General’s office for conducting a thorough investigation,” said Rep. Jason Crow, the Democrat who represents the district that includes Aurora. “…It’s now time for the City of Aurora and law enforcement leaders to engage with the Attorney General and start the process of correcting the issues identified in this investigation.”

Ian Farrell, with the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, said some of the items contained in the report surprised him.

“I wasn’t surprised by the racial disparity. I was disappointed, obviously, about that case, but that’s not a surprise, I think, for two reasons. One, we’ve seen enough news about the Aurora Police Department to suspect that that was the case. And two, quite frankly, I would expect just about every police department in the country, if they looked at them this way, they would find that they have racial disparities. It is very much ingrained in the system.”

“The thing that surprised me was some of the details about police training. For example, they didn’t have a written policy, or they don’t have a written policy on when it’s legal to stop someone. That’s about as basic as it gets for a police officer being able to do their job because if they stop someone illegally, everything else that comes after that is also a problem,” Farrell added. “They didn’t seem to understand what the word escalation means. The report says that they thought escalation means calming down, the officer calming down after they’ve used force, as opposed to de-escalating the tension of the situation before they use force.”

Read full article at The Denver Channel

Aurora police violate laws, use excessive force and racially biased practices, according to state report

Rob Has a Podcast 31 December, 1969 - 06:00pm

DENVER – The Aurora Police Department uses excessive force and racially biased police practices and violates state and federal laws as part of its patterns and practices, according to a 14-month investigation by the Colorado Department of Law whose results were released on Wednesday by Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser.

The Department of Law is recommending the city enter into a consent decree to change its policies, training, record keeping and hiring practices and will require the city to pay an independent monitor to update its progress to courts and the public on how it is implementing changes. Weiser said at a news conference if the city does not cooperate, his office will seek a court order to implement the consent decree.

The Department of Law and city of Aurora will have 60 days to come to an agreement on the consent decree.

“This is going to involve a back and forth, not just with the city, but with experts and with community member,” Weiser said Wednesday regarding the next steps in the process. “We recognize the significance in this document. So, we haven't done this by ourselves, the law calls for it to be a collaborative process and that's the way we're developing.”

Weiser said Aurora police showed a “consistent pattern of illegal behavior” at “many levels of the department.” According to his office, the department “does not create and oversee appropriate expectations for responsible behavior, which leads to the use of excessive force and the violation of the civil rights of its residents.”

“We want Aurora to succeed in these improvements and strongly believe that an agreement provides the best way to do so,” Weiser said in a statement. “Over the coming weeks, we look forward to working with Aurora and other stakeholders to create a consent decree that ensures these requirements are implemented promptly.”

The report found police officers used force against people of color 2 ½ times more often than white people based on population and that almost half of people who had forced used against them by officers were Black, even though only 15% of Aurora residents are Black.

It also found people of color were arrested 1.3 times more often than white people based on population, and Black people were more than twice as likely to be arrested as white people.

Weiser said that APD officers have regularly applied greater force than is reasonably warranted in situations, including taking people to the ground without giving them time to respond to officers and telling people to stop resisting when they were not in fact resisting officers.

He said Aurora officers had a “misplaced understanding” of de-escalation and focused more on calming down officers after using force rather than avoiding unnecessary escalation in the first place.

“We observed officers immediately escalating situations and circumstances in which the subject was in obvious mental health distress but did not present a risk to themselves or others,” Weiser said.

“These actions are unacceptable,” the attorney general said. “They hurt the people that law enforcement is entrusted to protect, and they destroyed community trust.”

Weiser announced in August 2020 that his office had been conducting the patterns and practices investigation into Aurora’s police and fire departments and instances in which officers might have deprived people of their constitutional rights.

The investigation was made possible after lawmakers passed, and Gov. Jared Polis, signed SB20-217, the sweeping police reform bill that was authored in the wake of the deaths of George Floyd and Elijah McClain. The investigation was the first state patterns and practices probe, Weiser said.

“The pattern or practice authority, as it’s known, is a tool the federal government has had for some time, but Colorado became a national leader by providing our department with the ability to engage in such investigations on a state level,” Weiser said Wednesday.

Rep. Leslie Herod, D-Denver, was one of the prime sponsors of the law and said Wednesday the patterns and practices investigation portion of the law “is doing exactly what it’s supposed to be doing.” She said it was the first of its kind in the nation and has “affirmed what citizens of Aurora and many other folks already knew – that the Aurora Police Department has operated in a way that is racist and is particularly racist against Black people.”

She said that the culture within the city of Aurora public safety departments “is dangerous for all citizens” and called for the city to work with the police department and with Colorado “to make immediate changes and rectify the past,” adding that she hoped people who have been victimized by Aurora officers in the past feel vindicated by the report.

“Racial discrimination in the community is real and the state will support and protect against that moving forward,” Herod said.

Mari Newman, who represents Lawayne Mosley, McClain’s father, reiterated that the law did what it was intended to do and said she was not surprised by what the report uncovered. She has sued the Aurora Police Department over excessive force and civil rights violations in the past.

“We hope this is just the beginning of what this law can do,” she said. “We hope other departments won’t wait for an investigation but will step back and say, ‘How do we change our practices?’ This can serve as a model across the country.”

The report released Monday said Aurora has also not updated practices it is required to update under that law, including documenting police interactions with members of the public.

It also finds that the Aurora Civil Service Commission, which has been heavily criticized in recent reporting by Denver7 Investigates because it hires officers without input from the police department itself, “overturns disciplinary actions in high-profile cases in a way that undermines the chief’s authority,” according to the attorney general’s office.

“Some of these changes are directly related to practices that violate the law,” Weiser said. “Other changes focus on culture, leadership and structural reforms that address and will prevent illegal conduct.”

The report found just 1.1% of Black applicants to the APD were offered a job compared to 4.2% of white applicants – which the attorney general’s office called “racial winnowing” that “can be observed at every step of the process, suggesting bias in Aurora’s recruitment and hiring process.”

McClain died after he was detained by Aurora police on Aug. 24, 2019. The 23-year-old unarmed Black man was put in a carotid hold and paramedics injected him with ketamine after incorrectly estimating his weight.

He went into cardiac arrest before dying a few days later.

The results of the investigation released Wednesday found Aurora Fire paramedics administered ketamine 22 times for so-called “excited delirium” between January 2019 and June 2020, but that they failed to follow proper monitoring protocols and administered it at levels above the maximum dose in more than half those incidents.

Aurora has suspended the use of ketamine and does not plan on reinstating its use, officials have said.

In statements issued Wednesday afternoon, Aurora City Manager Jim Twombly, Police Chief Vanessa Wilson and Fire Chief Fernando Gray said they appreciated the work from the attorney general’s office and would be reviewing the report and considering the parameters of the consent decree.

“I am still digesting the details of the Attorney General’s report, and it is painful to hear. It would be premature for me to comment on any specific findings at this time; however, the findings appear to align with the findings and recommendations presented from independent reviews the city commissioned more than a year ago, prior to the Attorney General’s review, and presented over the past several months – from Jonathan Smith and his team, 21CP Solutions and the Community Police Task Force,” Twombly said, in part. “Each recommendation and finding is valuable in helping us strengthen the ‘New Way’ of policing – and serving our community – that we are already implementing.

“In the coming weeks, we will work with the Attorney General’s Office to determine how to implement necessary and sustainable changes. The final consent decree will serve as another resource in our path forward,” Wilson said. “Today is incredibly difficult for not only the Aurora community but this agency. We acknowledge there are changes to be made. We will not broad brush this agency or discount the professionalism and integrity that individual officers bring to our community every day.”

“Aurora Fire Rescue committed to fully cooperating with the Attorney General’s Office during their review. This included providing access to our individual firefighters, crews and any and all EMS report data that was requested,” Gray said. “The primary issue identified by the Attorney General for our department was related to the use of ketamine. Although this medication was removed from our system more than a year ago and we have no plans to reintroduce this medication into our system, we find value in the report.”

Aurora Mayor Mike Coffman, like other city officials, pointed to the reforms already underway within the police and fire departments.

“Today the Attorney General released the findings of his team's investigation into Aurora Police and Fire. Most of the findings are not new and our Chiefs of Police and Fire Rescue have been working hard for over a year to address many of them,” Coffman said in a statement posted to Facebook. “I'm confident that the issues raised in the Attorney General's report, along with the other outside investigations commissioned by our city, will be corrected and that we will achieve an outcome that respects the rights of everyone who lives and works in our diverse community.”

Aurora City Councilman Juan Marcano said he believes the Aurora community is “done with performative changes.”

“This is the moment, with our community’s involvement, to really reimagine public safety. And again, it goes beyond policing in Aurora,” he said. “And if we fail to act then I expect them to hold us accountable at this coming election and the next one until they actually get the council and the city they deserve.”

McClain’s death led to the passage of HB21-1251 ("Appropriate Use Of Chemical Restraints On A Person") by Colorado lawmakers, which severely restricts when and how ketamine and other chemical restraints can be used by paramedics ahead of bringing a person to a hospital.

"I can't understate the impact of Elijah McClain's death has had on Colorado and Coloradans," Herod said Wednesday. "Had it not been for his murder and the fight of his mother, I don't think we would necessarily be here in the same place today."

She said the protests in Colorado that led to the investigations into McClain's death spurred what has come in the year-plus since.

"It's important to say to the protesters that what you suffered is real, is unjust, and should not happen in Aurora, Colorado or in this country," she said. "Your sacrifice was not in vain and has led us here today. for everyone who stood up for Elijah and other survivors, we're making changes."

The attorney general’s office had said little about the patterns and practices investigation since it was announced on the same day that McClain’s family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Aurora and the officers and paramedics involved in the 23-year-old’s death in August 2019. That lawsuit is still pending, according to court records.

The attorney general’s office said investigators with the Department of Law talked with current and former officers and AFD members and went on more than 200 hours of ridealongs. Investigators also attended meetings and reviewed use-of-force reports, according to Weiser’s office.

Weiser said the city of Aurora and the chiefs of its police and fire departments “cooperated fully” with the investigation and gave investigators “complete access” to the agencies.

On Sept. 1, Weiser announced a grand jury had returned a 32-count indictment against the three officers and two paramedics involved in McClain’s death, including manslaughter and criminal negligent homicide charges. Sheneen McClain said she was overwhelmed and cried when she learned about the indictment and thanked Weiser and his team.

Sheneen McClain said in an interview Wednesday she was disappointed it took the murder of her son to highlight the problems in Aurora.

“I feel hurt. The police never should have been allowed to get away with the murder of my son for two years,” she said. “…I feel like there’s so much wrong in Aurora, Colorado, they don’t even know how to help themselves.”

She said she is hopeful that no more people will have to die at the hands of police and “that there’s going to be a lot of change in Colorado for Elijah’s legacy.”

McClain says she believes ketamine should be banned for use by paramedics, something Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., is working on in Washington. “It shouldn’t be in the hands of anyone outside of the hospital,” she said.

McClain added that she believes the city needs to enter the consent decree and follow recommendations from the state that are made.

“I really believe that they need to follow the pattern and practice, and they shouldn’t come up against it at all,” she said. “They should do everything they can to make sure that nobody else loses their life because of racially motivated incidents like this. And I believe Mike Coffman needs to reach out or stop saying my son’s name. … I grew up here; I was born here; and I’m really disappointed in all the laws that have been allowing inhumane humans to run amok in our streets.”

"Phil Weiser confirmed what the rest of us in the civil rights community know — that Aurora has had a longstanding practice of police violence and bias police," said McClain's attorney, Qusair Mohamedbhai.

The patterns and practices investigation is one of at least five at the local, state and federal levels conducted in the wake of McClain’s death either into that incident or into Aurora public service departments.

A team of independent investigators in February released the results of their review of the investigation following McClain’s death, which they found was “flawed” and “failed to meaningfully develop a fulsome record”

The investigators were tasked not with assessing misconduct during the investigation but rather to report back on recommendations that could be learned from it.

Earlier this month, another independent investigation that analyzed the policies and practices within the police department, which was conducted by 21CP Solutions, who was tapped by the city, found a small share of officers were responsible for 40% of officer misconduct cases and that there was too much red tape for discipline of officers to be effective.

In June 2020, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil rights Division, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Denver Division confirmed they were looking at the McClain case for possible civil rights violations that may have occurred. No results of that investigation have been announced thus far.

“This report we're issuing is interdisciplinary in the finest sense, bringing together professionals from different backgrounds including law enforcement, prosecutors, former Deputy Assistant Attorney General at the United States Department of Justice to Civil Rights Division, a former United States Attorney who also worked as a trial attorney in the US DOJ Civil Rights Division, and many more,” Weiser said at Wednesday’s news conference.

“This project, in short, exemplifies one of our department's core values, which is to be better together, bringing people together to work on important issues. On behalf of the people of Colorado, I'm proud of how well this team worked together in a creative and collaborative fashion, both across our department, and with outside experts.”

Herod said she believed the report and subsequent action on the consent decree "will result in change for Colorado."

"These findings demonstrate the need for those policy changes," she said, "but there is still so much work left to do to keep our communities safe in Colorado."

The Aurora legislative delegation — Sens. Rhonda Fields and Janet Buckner, and Reps. Dominique Jackson, Naquetta Ricks, Iman Jodeh, Mike Weissman and Dafna Michaelson Jenet — issued a joint statement Wednesday lauding the report and the law passed last year.

“Today’s report is a glaring picture of how the Aurora Police Department operates, and gives us a full understanding of the gaps that must be filled in order to protect vulnerable families from racist, violent and inhumane practices within the Department,” they said. “…We will no longer tolerate bad actors going unchecked and this report, though disturbing, serves as a path toward dismantling systemic racism and bias within an institution that has lost the trust of our communities.”

“Today’s findings laid bare what many in our community know too well: that people of color are often treated differently by law enforcement and subject to abuse. I commend the Colorado Attorney General’s office for conducting a thorough investigation,” said Rep. Jason Crow, the Democrat who represents the district that includes Aurora. “…It’s now time for the City of Aurora and law enforcement leaders to engage with the Attorney General and start the process of correcting the issues identified in this investigation.”

Ian Farrell, with the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, said some of the items contained in the report surprised him.

“I wasn’t surprised by the racial disparity. I was disappointed, obviously, about that case, but that’s not a surprise, I think, for two reasons. One, we’ve seen enough news about the Aurora Police Department to suspect that that was the case. And two, quite frankly, I would expect just about every police department in the country, if they looked at them this way, they would find that they have racial disparities. It is very much ingrained in the system.”

“The thing that surprised me was some of the details about police training. For example, they didn’t have a written policy, or they don’t have a written policy on when it’s legal to stop someone. That’s about as basic as it gets for a police officer being able to do their job because if they stop someone illegally, everything else that comes after that is also a problem,” Farrell added. “They didn’t seem to understand what the word escalation means. The report says that they thought escalation means calming down, the officer calming down after they’ve used force, as opposed to de-escalating the tension of the situation before they use force.”

Big Brother 23: Live Feeds Down Until After Double Eviction

Big Brother Network 16 September, 2021 - 07:50am

Big Brother 23 is taking a break on the Live Feeds until Thursday night in preparation for the next Double Eviction. Settle in and wait while Big Brother gets two more Houseguests out the door before we discover who is off to the Jury House.

While we anticipated something was going to happen on this front we still didn’t know what to expect or how they’d do it, but hours after the Feeds turned off on Wednesday we finally have confirmation of the obvious from CBS. The Feeds are down. No kidding, thanks CBS.

We won’t see anything again on the Feeds until around 1AM ET (10PM PT) on Thursday night. So they’re going to wait until after the west coast broadcast finishes before giving us back the Feeds even though everyone that wants to know what’s going on will find out who was evicted during the Double when the initial east coast broadcast runs. Go figure.

CBS is still calling this a “live eviction” which is true in the sense that when it happened it was “live” but that’s the same as though everything ever on TV could be considered “live.” What we see on Thursday night will have been taped beforehand and will not actually be live.

When those Feeds do come back we’ll already be through the HOH and at least the nominations. They’ll need all that in the can for Friday’s special episode (8/7c) which replaces this coming week’s Sunday episode due to the Emmy Awards show. At that point, production could still wait until Saturday for the F4 Veto comp, but we won’t know for sure just yet.

During the initial downtime for the Feeds, we were able to hear over the Feeds in an audio leak that the next Veto comp, to be held during the Double Eviction, would be “What The Bleep?” Production was running through tests and preparing all the comps and for some reason let that play out over the Feeds, but just the audio, no video. Oops.

So get on outside, enjoy the break, and be ready for more Big Brother on Thursday night. It’s a two-hour Double Eviction and I’m curious to see how they plan to fill all that time. Maybe we’ll get some surprise twists and turns along the way. But in the end we should be down to the Final 4 of Big Brother 23. Best of luck to all the HGs!

Feeds are down for two days to pre-record the "live eviction"… pre-recording the *live* eviction… "Live." Pre-recorded… #BB23 https://t.co/jBBaB1IkvO pic.twitter.com/mZUklK5g5A

— Big Brother Network (@bigbrothernet) September 15, 2021

Big Brother 23: Counting The Votes In Week 10 [Poll]

Big Brother 23 Episode 30 Recap: BB Comics Can’t Save The Day

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Big Brother 23 Live Feeds Week 10: Tuesday Night Highlights

Big Brother Network 16 September, 2021 - 07:50am

It was a pretty mild evening in the Big Brother 23 house, as Tiffany has seemingly accepted her fate, and the houseguests have learned there won’t be a surprise eviction Wednesday as the had begun to suspect, so there’s no reason to be scrambling. Azah did do some cam talking that revealed she would much rather Hannah go over Tiffany this week, but that’s not something she’s going to be able to push.

If you’ve got the Live Feeds (Free Trial) then you can watch all of these moments with the Flashback feature to go back and watch those important conversations or funny scenes you may have missed.

3:03 PM BBT – Derek tells Xavier that he doesn’t want to sit next to Hannah because she’s “female” and the “females are going to go more towards” her. Xavier tells him he has to stop saying that. Xavier says he makes it sound like women can’t think on their own.

3:04 PM BBT – Derek says he doesn’t mean it like that, but Xavier says it sounds like he’s saying they would only vote for Hannah because she’s a woman. He says that is belittling their game.

3:11 PM BBT – Azah talking to the cameras, asks “why am I keeping Hannah?” She says Hannah hasn’t said one thing to her about why she needs her. Azah says she’s (A) one of the easiest people to take to the end, but what they don’t like is that she hasn’t touched the block yet. She says if Tiffany wins HOH, she’s not touching the block. But if anyone else wins HOH, she’s toughing the block. So, Azah would rather Tiffany stay, but she’s the only one.

3:19 PM BBT – Derek tells Xavier that Tiffany said Kyland put her up to build his resume. Derek laughs and says if he wanted to build his resume he would have targeted Xavier.

3;38 PM BBT – Everyone is talking about how boring it is, and they are trying to decide what games they can play in the house.

3:50 PM BBT – Xavier asks Hannah why she doesn’t think there will be a surprise eviction Wednesday. She says it was confirmed to her it would be Thursday as usual.

3:52 PM BBT – The Final 6 are going to play a game of Cops and Robbers.

4:50 PM BBT – HGs are still playing their game.

5:37 PM BBT – Derek asks Azah if she has a deal with Hannah. She says no and asks where he got that from. Azah said she actually told Hannah that she can’t make her a deal.

5:45 PM BBT – Derek tells Azah that Hannah is next and the only reason Tiffany is going out this week is because he doesn’t feel comfortable with her and Xavier doesn’t feel comfortable with her.

6:25 PM BBT – It’s time for Covid-19 testing.

7:10 PM BBT – Kyland is getting things ready to cook dinner.

7:39 PM BBT – Hannah says to the cameras that if she’s not the winner, she would rather it be Xavier. She says that doesn’t mean she wouldn’t cut him if given the chance.

7:40 PM BBT – Xavier and Derek studying and are going over days and what competitions players competing in.

7:41 PM BBT – Hannah says if she wins HOH she’s getting rid of either Kyland or Xavier. She says she would go to the end with Kyland or Xavier, and Azah, and then take Azah to Final 2.

7:45 PM BBT – Hannah thinks she’d go with Kyland and Derek as her nominees. She thinks that Xavier is less likely to use the veto on Kyland than Kyland would be on Xavier.

8:08 PM BBT – Xavier tells Tiffany that the Diary Room was trying to pry into what he felt about Alyssa. He says they were trying to make something out of it. Then he says he’ll explain it later.

8:09 PM BBT – Tiffany and Derek are having a rare nice moment. She even gives him a friendly kiss.

8:30 PM BBT – It’s Taco Tuesday time.

9:25 PM BBT – Everyone is still hanging out around the kitchen table, talking and laughing.

10:45 PM BBT – Xavier and Kyland discuss how Hannah and Tiffany are trying to make DF aware that he can’t win against either Ky/X. Kyland says they need to downplay their achievements to DF doesn’t think about that too much.

11:30 PM BBT – Tiffany camtalking her frustrations that HGs are playing a weak game. She thinks the HGs are underestimating Hannah.

11:50 PM BBT – Xavier joins Tiffany and asks about her campaigning. She isn’t sure if people want her out for strategy or because they’re bitter. Tiffany explains how she could no longer work with Kyland after he targeted her. Tiffany warns Xavier that Hannah is smarter than they think and she (H) wouldn’t take X to the end.

12:10 AM BBT – Tiffany continues to campaign to Xavier. She says she hasn’t promised a F2 to anyone. She offered Kyland a deal if he saved her, but not a F2. Tiffany says she didn’t lie to DF and promise him a F2 because she doesn’t trust him.

12:20 AM BBT – Xavier lets Tiffany know he’s leaning toward voting her out over Hannah. He says Hannah has made him the same promises. Tiffany says the difference is that if she (T) stays then they can work together along with Azah. Tiffany says she has Azah’s support to stay.

12:25 AM BBT – Tiffany detailing to Xavier how the Jury won’t like her and wouldn’t vote for her. He counters the Jury will respect her game more than Hannah’s. Xavier says she’s played a great game. Tiffany says she’ll be sitting in Jury thinking, “I told you so” when Hannah gets them.

12:30 AM BBT – Tiffany says they’re making her lose respect for Big Brother because they’re playing such a weak game by keeping Hannah. She taunts Xavier that he must be playing more of an emotional game.

12:35 AM BBT – Xavier says he feels like the swing vote. Tiffany explains he is because she wants to work with him (X) and not DF, so she hasn’t approached DF like this because he (DF) is unpredictable.

12:45 AM BBT – Tiffany, alone, camtalks that she just might end up being a bitter Juror and tainting the whole Jury.

12:50 AM BBT – Xavier asks Azah what she’s thinking for the vote. She asks if he has changed his mind which he denies. Azah says she’s been swaying but will do what the house wants.

1:00 AM BBT – X, Azah, and DF are back to their bedroom winding down for the night.

1:13 AM BBT – Kyland comes to Tiffany at her bed and gestures for if she wants to come upstairs. She declines.

1:22 AM BBT – Kyland goes back to Tiffany in bed and asks her again directly if she’ll come upstairs to his room. She says, “I don’t want to.” He leaves for upstairs.

1:25 AM BBT – Kyland returns to the HOH room after trying to get Tiffany to come upstairs and join him. She declined. Kyland camtalks that he was trying to help her but her bad decisions continue. Lights out.

Tiffany is working the votes where she can and sounds like she could have Azah’s support and she knows DF isn’t coming to her rescue so the path to safety is through Xavier. But Xavier isn’t budging on this. He wants Tiffany out to go along with Kyland’s wishes. Will the HGs regret keeping Hannah over Tiffany? We’ll have to see who wins HOH and Veto next to know.

You can watch all of these Big Brother events using the archives Flashback, the DVR-like feature of this year’s Live Feeds which means it’s always live, even when you missed it! Sign-up now to get the free trial to watch it all live & uncensored.

Big Brother 23 Live Feeds Week 10: Tuesday Daytime Highlights

Tonight On Big Brother 23: Power of Veto Events

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Big Brother 23 Week 10 Survey Results: Who Are Your Favorite Houseguests?

Big Brother Network 16 September, 2021 - 07:50am

Gone but not forgotten continues to sum how Big Brother 23 fans feel about Derek X.

Derek X has once again topped our most popular houseguest poll, and he also came out on top of the poll asking who you are voting for America’s Favorite Houseguest.

Let’s take a closer look at the popularity poll. Derek X finished on top with 54.6 percent of the vote. Coming in second this week was Xavier with 28.3 percent. Tiffany came in third with 22.4 percent while Hannah closed out the Top 4 with 22 percent. I’m surprised that Xavier’s popularity has surpassed Tiffany’s, but then again the show edit has been far more in his favor than it has Tiffany’s and Hannah’s.

At the opposite end of the poll are the evicted houseguests, with Travis, Brent, Frenchie and Whitney in the Bottom 4.

Xavier once again tops the who is playing the best game poll. This week he ran away with the vote, getting 63.4 percent. Kyland was a very distant second with 13 percent. Hannah came in third with 10.5 percent.  Tiffany dropped to fourth this week with 9.9 percent, as we all see that she will be most likely leaving this week. Azah finished fifth and Derek F came in dead last. Azah had 1.3 percent of the vote while Derek F had 1.1 percent.

This week we asked for the first time who you will be voting for America’s Favorite Houseguest, and Derek X topped that poll with 54.3 precent of the vote. Tiffany came in second with 11 percent, and Xavier was third 9.3. Claire rounded out the Top 4 with 6.5 percent. Of course those getting the least votes here were Travis, Brent, Whitney and Frenchie.

As for how much you like this season, it was dropped to 3.5 out of 5.

Be sure to check out the Big Brother 23 Week 10 Survey graphic below to see how everyone stacked up.

Big Brother 23 Live Feeds Week 10: Monday Night Highlights

Big Brother 23 Live Feeds Week 10: Tuesday Daytime Highlights

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'Big Brother' recap: An important veto sees the Cookout drawing lines in the sand

Entertainment Weekly News 15 September, 2021 - 09:25pm

Of course, not everyone is upset about Tiffany being on the block. In fact, Big D is ecstatic. If he had his way, Tiffany would have been his target a long time ago, but he stayed loyal to the Cookout and their mission. And, of course, Xavier is relieved that Kyland sticks with their agreement. As an added bonus, Kyland gets to be the one to ruin his relationship with Tiffany, and Xavier gets no blood on his hands.

On the other end of the spectrum, Hannah is confused by this decision. She didn't think she'd be on the block or that Kyland would be going after Tiffany, so she sits him down for a chat. During this chat, Kyland, for some reason, mentions that he didn't think Xavier and Tiffany would want to work together going forward, so that's partly why she's his target. That tips off Hannah to their potential alliance (not that it would have been that hard to figure out anyway), and she begins worrying that if Tiffany goes home this week, the guys will be working together and will pick them off one by one.

I'm honestly not sure that would happen. The guys are definitely working together this week because they all recognize that Tiffany is the biggest threat to them winning the game, but if she goes home, there are still plenty of avenues to the Final 2. Kyland might realize Xavier is the next biggest threat in the house once Tiffany is gone, or Azah, who's close to Big D and Xavier, might find a way to work with them and get to the end. There's still a lot of game to play.

But, focusing on the present for now, this is a huge veto competition with massive implications for the rest of the season. Tiffany and Hannah believe that the best option would be Azah winning so that she could pull one of them off the block, forcing Kyland to put up a guy and gain control of the vote. As for the guys, they want to prevent Tiffany from winning so that she remains the target. The competition is the classic "BB Comics," where players use a zipline to coast past a series of comic book covers featuring the season's players and then must memorize the order and other details. Whoever organizes their comics in the correct order the fastest wins veto.

As Kyland reads out the scores, there are two frontrunners insanely close. Big D comes in with a time of 10:05, and Hannah ends up right behind him at 10:06. Nobody else comes close, but there's still Kyland's time to reveal. He ends up coming in a good three minutes ahead of Big D, securing the veto and keeping control of his HOH week. Honestly, I feel bad for Big D here. He badly wants to win a competition, and this was definitely his best performance of the season so far.

So, with full control over the nominations, Kyland sits down with Xavier to discuss things. Xavier says he assumes he's keeping nominations the same, but Kyland expresses some doubt, suggesting he could maybe pull Hannah off the block, try to smooth things over with her, put up Big D as a pawn, and still target Tiffany. To me, this feels like Kyland exploring all options rather than anything concrete. At this point, he won't be able to smooth things over with Hannah, and there's no way Big D would enjoy being on the block so that Kyland can manage the jury.

While the above options don't make much sense to me, when Tiffany sits down with Kyland and tries to persuade him that if she stays, she'll be his ride or die until the end, I have to wonder if he's thinking about it. If I'm trying to analyze Kyland's position, I think he might have a better chance in a Final 2 with Tiffany rather than Xavier, simply because Tiffany is a more confrontational personality who didn't necessarily get along with everyone in the house, whereas Xavier seems pretty universally liked. But, as Kyland notes, Tiffany has proven again and again that she's willing to do anything to further her personal game (which, you know, is what all of these players are doing, but you get my point), so trusting her is no easy task.

Sure enough, Kyland sticks with his plan. He doesn't use the veto and keeps the nominations the same, all but assuring that Tiffany will be the first member of the Cookout sent to the jury house.

Big Brother 23 Spoilers: Who Will Probably Be Evicted Week 10

CinemaBlend 15 September, 2021 - 03:56pm

Kyland Young was the first of The Cookout in Big Brother Season 23 to get the Head of Household in the Final 6, and in a move that seemed tied to an unplanned HOH win the week prior, nominated Tiffany Mitchell alongside Hannah Chaddha for eviction. Kyland also snagged the veto in what was a strong competitive week for him, so it's looking like one of these two women will leave on Thursday.

Of course, Big Brother Season 23 also has another double eviction coming up, which means that one other Houseguest will be leaving the house as well on Thursday. With that being said, let's dive into which of the two nominees is most likely to leave this week and who may be the second target when it's time for the next eviction.

Tiffany Mitchell has had a killer run in Big Brother Season 23, but I think many will agree that winning the prior week's Head of Household hurt her game more than helped it in the long run. Her bucking The Cookout's agreed plan to let Azah Awasum have the HOH led to massive distrust by Kyland Young and Xavier Prather, and ultimately Derek Frazier and Azah are along for the ride. There's a close to zero chance she'll escape this eviction, but miracles have happened in the past.

If Tiffany Mitchell leaves, four out of five remaining players have stated that Hannah Chaddha would be the obvious next target. Azah Awasum hasn't felt that keeping Hannah will benefit her game, and Derek Frazier, Kyland Young, and Xavier Prather have a Final Three deal that's reliant on taking Azah with them to the Final Four. That means the odds of Hannah being nominated are high, and she'll either need to win the Head of Household or Power of Veto to survive the night.

Should Hannah win, she's already expressed to Tiffany Mitchell ahead of Thursday that her full intention is to target Kyland Young for eviction. If Kyland were to win the veto and prevent that, I assume she would put up Xavier Prather as the next dominant comp threat in the house. If Hannah won the Head of Household competition, I expect to see one of those two men out the door.

Xavier Prather has stated he'd rather not win Head of Household to compete in the Final Four. Who knows if that plan will hold, but if it does, then Hannah would be up against Derek Frazier and Azah Awasum for the Head of Household, and neither of those two has won a competition all season. Hannah only has one veto win in the game but has stated on multiple occasions she's thrown competitions to keep a low profile. I also believe it's likely Xavier will play for the Head of Household and only throw if he's certain that Hannah cannot win.

Ideally, Hannah's game would be best served if she won the veto and forced the other players to evict one of their own. Then she'd be able to compete for the Final Four HOH and have a shot at competing in the finale should she win. As for who would likely be sent out in the chance Hannah isn't available for eviction and isn't Head of Household, I would expect Azah Awasum to be the next most likely evictee. If neither is an option, I think it would be toss up on who would be sent after that.

Big Brother airs on CBS this Wednesday and Thursday at 8:00 p.m. ET and Sunday at 10:00 p.m. ET. Continue to stick with CinemaBlend for more on the season and for some of our interviews with the cast members who have been evicted thus far.

Big Brother Season 23: What's Better About The New Season, And What Still Needs To Change

CinemaBlend 14 September, 2021 - 05:04pm

Big Brother Season 23 has been a landmark season for the franchise, with a few key changes that, so far, have resulted in big change for the overall game. Some of the changes have been well-received by the audience at large, but there's still work to be done by the CBS reality series.

Not so much that Big Brother is right back to where it started with a whole new set of issues, but there are ways it can continue to improve as it moves into Big Brother: Celebrity Edition and the speculative Big Brother Season 24. Note that Zingbot's zings are not on the list because I've decided to let him off the hook this season since the cast is just so darn lovable.

Big Brother Season 23 promised ahead of the season the cast would be different and committed to a much more diverse cast than in the season's past. Big Brother delivered on the promise and gave fans a diverse cast where most if not every person that's been on the show is likable. From Azah Awasum to Xavier Prather, it's fair to say the cast alone has made this season one of the most watchable in years.

Another element is that most, if not all of Big Brother Season 23's Houseguests are fans of the game. In a season where most players are content to follow one Houseguest's playbook only to be unceremoniously voted off, we haven't really seen that this season. Everyone is looking to make moves they think will advance their game, and that's cool to see. The gameplay is much better this season than in the past, and I prefer that much more than recruited players who didn't watch the show and didn't bother to before playing the game.

When Big Brother All-Stars 2 did its Triple Eviction late in the season, it almost felt like an act of mercy. Season 23 the late-game eviction is back with a twist, but it's back-to-back double eviction weeks. In a bad season it's good to just speed things up, but in Season 23, it's been torture to know these evictions were coming.

The Cookout busted its ass to get to the Final Six, and now as opposed to seeing the real unexpected drama of Big Brother Season 23 unfold, we'll immediately drop down from Six to the Final Four. Personally, I think doing the back-to-back double-evictions would've been more entertaining earlier in the season, even if they happened pre-jury. I'd much rather quickly lose the Houseguests I barely knew in the course of an hour than those who have been in the house the better part of two months. Maybe other seasons would be different, but I think it's something for Big Brother to consider.

Big Brother is a tense game, but despite that, few have stressed out to the point they've disparaged others in the house on a personal level. No one has called anyone a "Polyester-haired bitch," nor has anyone cussed each other out on Taco Tuesday all in an effort to create some drama in the game. All tension has been tied to gameplay, and even if some people don't agree, that's a good thing.

It's been a sad reality that Big Brother Houseguests have had to answer for racial slurs uttered in past seasons, and said things so upsetting to the public they lost their job after exiting the game. I really can't stress enough how great it is that we haven't seen that this season, and how happy I've been that even at their most stressed, all Big Brother Houseguests have been decent human beings. I'm all for drama in the house, but not some of the demeaning and racist ugliness we've seen in years past. That's definitely an era of Big Brother that should be left in the past.

Big Brother Season 23 had a good deal of physical competitions this year, which is a shame because I'd hoped this would be something that would also be tweaked in the game. While it wasn't always the case in the game, modern seasons of Big Brother heavily favor the most in-shape people of the house. If the house isn't wise enough to take those shots away from major competitors early in the game, there's a high probability we ultimately see those people in the end of the game.

I personally feel like we could've seen more mental competitions in Big Brother Season 23 or more old-school endurance competitions like the Pressure Cooker. I would much rather watch people toy with each other for 16 hours and try to outlast one another rather than seeing who can lean on a wall the longest. If I wanted to see beautiful people who work out three times a day I'd be watching Love Island, let's mix things up and not make so many of the competitions favor the physically dominant players.

I know a lot of fans joked and made memes when it was announced Big Brother Season 23 would give the winner $750,000, but just because it's not $1 million doesn't mean it's not a step in the right direction. I mean, sure, there's probably a chunk of alumni from Season 22 who wondered why this wasn't done during the All-Stars season, but at least the series is a step closer to rewarding a winner for nearly 3 months of work.

Big Brother still isn't awarding its winners Survivor-level prize money, and I could make a ton of arguments as to why Big Brother winners deserve the money way more in comparison, but that's an entirely different conversation. For now, let's just leave it at Big Brother winners have been criminally underpaid for years, and it's nice to see them much closer to what they should be paid.

Big Brother is a show that literally broadcasts a vast majority of its gameplay on streaming services, so it's a little embarrassing as a fan to say it's not enough. Fans have asked for years for more content from the Jury House, and just more access in general to interviews and other activities with the Houseguests. CBS has truthfully made great strides in that with extended interviews with evicted Houseguests on Instagram, and they've even had the Jury make some Tik Toks while they wait for the game to end.

I won't go so far as to say that I want cameras in the Jury House, because I think those players need a break from constant surveillance. With that said, would. it be so hard to upload the full unedited versions of competitions to Paramount+? I think the argument made would be that it's too boring, but we're a fandom who watches people hang out in a house for hours waiting for someone to say something interesting, I don't think many would be bored by something like that. I just think there's an opportunity for Big Brother to do more with its content than what we're currently getting.

Big Brother Season 23 airs on CBS Sundays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. Continue to stick with CinemaBlend for more on the beloved franchise, and check out our interviews with this season's cast about their various thoughts on the game.

Mick likes good television, but also reality television. He grew up on Star Wars, DC, Marvel, and pro wrestling and loves to discuss and dissect most of it. He’s been writing online for over a decade and never dreamed he’d be in the position he is today.

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