Biden Administration Launches Investigation into Broken McDonald’s Ice Cream Machines

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Breitbart 03 September, 2021 - 08:48pm 5 views

Who makes mcdonalds ice cream machines?

The Taylor Company is an American manufacturer of food service equipment located in Rockton, Illinois. They are known as the supplier and maker of several machines that McDonald's uses, including their grills and many of their ice cream machines. wikipedia.orgTaylor Company

FTC wants to know why McDonald's ice cream machines break so often

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Why are McDonald's ice cream machines always broken? FTC aims to find out

KENS 5: Your San Antonio News Source 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

FTC probing broken McDonald's ice cream machines

WSLS 10 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

America's Largest Fast-Food Chain Is Being Investigated by the Federal Government | Eat This Not That

Eat This, Not That 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

The antitrust agency has reached out to McDonald's franchise owners, who were sent letters of inquiry earlier this summer, the Wall Street Journal reports. Among the things the feds want to know? How frequently franchisees are permitted to repair their own ice cream machines.

The probe of the malfunctioning equipment was described as exploratory in a letter viewed by The Journal. "The existence of a preliminary investigation does not indicate the FTC or its staff have found any wrongdoing," the agency wrote.

But those familiar with the long and winding story of McDonald's McFlurry woes might not be surprised to learn of the federal government's intervention. McDonald's ice cream equipment is well known for its frequent breakdowns. Countless social media comments document the drama, plus there's a website called McBroken that tracks machines that are "out of operation." Mickey D's even joked about its woes in an infamous 2020 tweet that has since garnered nearly 30,000 likes.

Public scrutiny kicked up a notch after news broke earlier this year of a lawsuit filed against Taylor, the main manufacturer of the ice cream machines. Kytch, a tech company that created a diagnostic tool allowing McDonald's restaurant owners to finetune the machines and avoid expensive breakdowns, alleged that Taylor and a McDonald's franchisee had conspired to duplicate its technology.

Kytch's lawsuit is still making its way through California Superior court. Though McDonald's is not directly involved in the complaint, that didn't stop Jeremy O'Sullivan, Kytch's co-founder, from taking a shot at the burger slinger this spring. With franchisees seemingly forced to enter into expensive repair contracts with Taylor, O'Sullivan suggested that McDonald's was complicit in a shakedown.

"It's a huge money maker to have a customer that's purposefully, intentionally blind and unable to make very fundamental changes to their own equipment," O'Sullivan told Wired in April.

Whether or not that claim holds up in court remains to be seen. Legal drama aside, here's hoping that the ultimate resolution will be ice cream readily available to the masses.

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Broken McDonald’s ice cream machines under investigation by the FTC

WSLS 10 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

The antitrust agency has reached out to McDonald's franchise owners, who were sent letters of inquiry earlier this summer, the Wall Street Journal reports. Among the things the feds want to know? How frequently franchisees are permitted to repair their own ice cream machines.

The probe of the malfunctioning equipment was described as exploratory in a letter viewed by The Journal. "The existence of a preliminary investigation does not indicate the FTC or its staff have found any wrongdoing," the agency wrote.

But those familiar with the long and winding story of McDonald's McFlurry woes might not be surprised to learn of the federal government's intervention. McDonald's ice cream equipment is well known for its frequent breakdowns. Countless social media comments document the drama, plus there's a website called McBroken that tracks machines that are "out of operation." Mickey D's even joked about its woes in an infamous 2020 tweet that has since garnered nearly 30,000 likes.

Public scrutiny kicked up a notch after news broke earlier this year of a lawsuit filed against Taylor, the main manufacturer of the ice cream machines. Kytch, a tech company that created a diagnostic tool allowing McDonald's restaurant owners to finetune the machines and avoid expensive breakdowns, alleged that Taylor and a McDonald's franchisee had conspired to duplicate its technology.

Kytch's lawsuit is still making its way through California Superior court. Though McDonald's is not directly involved in the complaint, that didn't stop Jeremy O'Sullivan, Kytch's co-founder, from taking a shot at the burger slinger this spring. With franchisees seemingly forced to enter into expensive repair contracts with Taylor, O'Sullivan suggested that McDonald's was complicit in a shakedown.

"It's a huge money maker to have a customer that's purposefully, intentionally blind and unable to make very fundamental changes to their own equipment," O'Sullivan told Wired in April.

Whether or not that claim holds up in court remains to be seen. Legal drama aside, here's hoping that the ultimate resolution will be ice cream readily available to the masses.

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© 2020 Galvanized Media. All Rights Reserved. EatThis.com is part of the AllRecipes Food Group

FTC looking into why McDonald's McFlurry ice cream machines are often broken (Video)

Social News XYZ 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

The antitrust agency has reached out to McDonald's franchise owners, who were sent letters of inquiry earlier this summer, the Wall Street Journal reports. Among the things the feds want to know? How frequently franchisees are permitted to repair their own ice cream machines.

The probe of the malfunctioning equipment was described as exploratory in a letter viewed by The Journal. "The existence of a preliminary investigation does not indicate the FTC or its staff have found any wrongdoing," the agency wrote.

But those familiar with the long and winding story of McDonald's McFlurry woes might not be surprised to learn of the federal government's intervention. McDonald's ice cream equipment is well known for its frequent breakdowns. Countless social media comments document the drama, plus there's a website called McBroken that tracks machines that are "out of operation." Mickey D's even joked about its woes in an infamous 2020 tweet that has since garnered nearly 30,000 likes.

Public scrutiny kicked up a notch after news broke earlier this year of a lawsuit filed against Taylor, the main manufacturer of the ice cream machines. Kytch, a tech company that created a diagnostic tool allowing McDonald's restaurant owners to finetune the machines and avoid expensive breakdowns, alleged that Taylor and a McDonald's franchisee had conspired to duplicate its technology.

Kytch's lawsuit is still making its way through California Superior court. Though McDonald's is not directly involved in the complaint, that didn't stop Jeremy O'Sullivan, Kytch's co-founder, from taking a shot at the burger slinger this spring. With franchisees seemingly forced to enter into expensive repair contracts with Taylor, O'Sullivan suggested that McDonald's was complicit in a shakedown.

"It's a huge money maker to have a customer that's purposefully, intentionally blind and unable to make very fundamental changes to their own equipment," O'Sullivan told Wired in April.

Whether or not that claim holds up in court remains to be seen. Legal drama aside, here's hoping that the ultimate resolution will be ice cream readily available to the masses.

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© 2020 Galvanized Media. All Rights Reserved. EatThis.com is part of the AllRecipes Food Group

The FTC Is Investigating McDonald's McFlurry Machines

Mental Floss 05 September, 2021 - 03:11pm

Now, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is looking to dispense more than just a creamy confection—they want to dispense some sweet justice.

The consumer advocacy agency has reached out to McDonald’s franchisees to inquire about the circumstances surrounding the machine and its sullied reputation. The objective is to gather information about why the units tend to break down and who makes repairs when they do.

Why does the FTC care? Their purview involves oversight on right-to-repair laws, which look to break up companies that insist on monopolizing the repair of commercial equipment. Taylor, the company that manufactures the McFlurry machines, mandates that only Taylor representatives are permitted to fix it.

Taylor recently became embroiled in a legal tussle with Kytch, a company that offers a diagnostic device that assists franchisees in identifying problems with McFlurry machines and suggesting fixes. Kytch recently obtained a restraining order prohibiting Taylor from possessing Kytch units and taking them apart to see how they worked.

It’s generally believed that the McFlurry machines suffer from repeated outages owing to a complicated cleaning procedure that forces employees to take it apart and put it through a lengthy four-hour-long sanitizing process. Coupled with malfunctions, the odds of actually placing a successful order for a McFlurry can vary.

The FTC’s investigation is being labeled preliminary for now, but depending on what they find, it’s possible the agency may one day get to the bottom of this fast food crisis.

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