Brian Flores expects WR Will Fuller to make debut for Miami Dolphins on Sunday

Sports

ESPN 24 September, 2021 - 12:13pm 18 views

Is Tua Tagovailoa injured?

— Tua Tagovailoa has fractured ribs and will miss Sunday's game in Las Vegas against the Raiders, Dolphins coach Brian Flores announced Wednesday. USA TODAYDolphins QB Tua Tagovailoa out for Sunday's game vs. Raiders with fractured ribs

Who is Miami's quarterback?

Miami starting quarterback Tua Tagovailoa has fractured ribs and will not play against the Raiders on Sunday, Dolphins coach Brian Flores announced. Jacoby Brissett will start in Tagovailoa's place. Brissett, who is in his first season with Miami, played four years with the Colts. Las Vegas Review-JournalMiami Dolphins starting QB out against Raiders on Sunday

Las Vegas Raiders prepare to play Miami on Sunday

FOX5 Las Vegas 24 September, 2021 - 04:00pm

Kelly: Dolphins need Will Fuller to be dynamic, consistent, reliable right away | Commentary

South Florida Sun Sentinel 24 September, 2021 - 04:00pm

MIAMI GARDENS — The Miami Dolphins can finally play with the team’s new toy Sunday.

Will Fuller, the Dolphins’ biggest free agent addition this offseason, completed a full week of practice with his new team for the first time since mandatory minicamp back in the summer.

That hints that Fuller appears to be on track to play in Sunday’s road game against the Las Vegas Raiders, which excited everyone associated with the Dolphins.

Fuller missed all of training camp and the preseason because of an undisclosed soft tissue injury. He sat out the season opener because of an NFL imposed suspension, which wrapped up a six-game suspension for PED use that stemmed from his 2020 season with the Houston Texans.

And last week Fuller left the team after practicing once to address what was labeled as a personal issue.

He returned on Monday and had three days of practice with Miami’s offense, and the hope is that he’ll be incorporated into the game plan come Sunday.

The early reviews from Fuller’s teammates haven’t exactly lowered the bar on expectations.

“It doesn’t even look like he’s running. He’s picking up so much ground while he’s out there and moving along. You can’t even tell he’s trying,” fellow receiver Albert Wilson said. “His speed is outstanding, and it’s definitely going to be something we can use in this offense.”

The Dolphins signed Fuller to a one-year incentive-laden deal worth a base of $10.6 million, with an extra $3 million tied to his productivity, hoping that his presence would open up the field for the rest of Miami’s arsenal.

“I got a chance to play against Will Fuller back when I was in their division and a guy with his level of speed is tough,” said free safety Jason McCourty, who began his NFL career with the Tennessee Titans. “We all go through things and the whole 9 [yards], so it’s fun to just see him out here practicing with the guys and smiling and just being able to get acclimated.”

Without Fuller this season, Miami has the NFL’s worst offense in points scored (8.5) and are 24th in total yards per game (237.5). And Miami will be without starting quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, who is sidelined with bruised ribs.

Jacoby Brissett will start Sunday’s game against the Raiders as Tagovailoa’s replacement, and it’s possible he could lead the offense for as much as a month while Tagovailoa’s broken ribs heal.

At least he’ll have all the team’s top receivers at his disposal.

“I think having Will [Fuller] out there will help open things up a little bit more,” said fellow receiver DeVante Parker, who led the Dolphins in receptions the past two seasons. “Looking forward to just have him out there with us.”

Fuller, who received $9 million of his salary in a signing bonus and will be paid a $990,000 salary during the season, can get an additional $1 million to his paycheck if he scores nine or more touchdowns in 2021.

That could be the most difficult of his incentives, considering he’s never scored nine touchdowns in a season.

His career high was eight touchdowns, which was achieved last season in 11 games, before he was suspended six games for PED use. Last season, 11 receivers and three tight ends in the NFL scored nine or more touchdowns.

Parker was the last Dolphins receiver to score eight or more (nine) receiving touchdowns. Now he’s paired with Fuller on the perimeter and Jaylen Waddle working the slot and Mike Gesicki attacking the seam. If everyone can stay healthy, the Dolphins have a receiving corps that could be feared in the NFL.

And that’s the problem. Each of those receivers has struggled to stay on the field during his college and/or professional career.

Fuller has plenty riding on the fact that this could be his year.

Fuller also has $1 million in bonuses tied to receiving yards and another $950,000 tied to his reception total this season. So it benefits him to be productive, consistent and durable.

And it’s not just about this season’s paycheck, considering the 27-year-old gambled on himself, taking a one-year prove it deal with the Dolphins.

He needs to prove that he loves the game and will put in the work to live up to his potential, and his paycheck, which is the fourth highest on the team this season, trailing Waddle and cornerbacks Byron Jones and Xavien Howard.

Fuller is being paid like a playmaker. Let us hope he resembles one for an entire season and doesn’t fall into the free-agent bust category on the ledger.

Copyright © 2021, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

If you are a California Resident, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) gives you the right to opt out of the sale of your personal information (“PI”).

The opt-out on this page applies only to targeted advertising. To opt out of other sales of PI, please click here

As our Privacy Policy states, we and third-party advertising partners use technology to collect information (e.g., device IDs, advertising IDs, usage activity), and may share this information with third parties, to deliver interest-based ads. CCPA may consider some of these activities to be “sales” of your PI. The third parties (“Downstream Participants”) may “re-sell” this PI.

To opt out of sales of PI by this website for targeted advertising use the below OPT-OUT TOOL

To opt out of re-sales by Downstream Participants, visit their digital properties listed at https://www.iabprivacy.com/optout.html. We are not responsible for this information or Downstream Participants’ privacy statements or compliance.

Opting out does not mean you will stop seeing ads – they just may be less relevant to you.

In addition, you may continue to receive ads tailored to your interests, including based upon personal information not sold by us, sold by us before you opted out, or sold by sources from which you have not opted out.

To learn more about interest-based advertising across sites and additional opt-out choices, visit one or more of the following industry opt-out links: http://optout.aboutads.info/ http://optout.networkadvertising.org/ http://www.aboutads.info/appchoices and/or our Privacy Policy.

These cookies are essential in order to enable you to move around the website and use its features. These are all the cookies without which the website could not perform basic functions. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not then work.

Opting out does not mean you will stop seeing ads – they just may be less relevant to you. In addition, you may continue to receive ads tailored to your interests, including based upon personal information not sold by us, sold by us before you opted out, or sold by sources from which you have not opted out. To learn more about interest-based advertising across sites and additional opt-out choices, visit one or more of the following industry opt-out links: http://optout.aboutads.info/, http://optout.networkadvertising.org/ and http://www.aboutads.info/appchoices and/or our privacy policy. Please also note: • That this opt-out is device and/or browser based. You must opt out on each device and each browser where you want your choice to apply. • This opt-out is also website-specific. You must opt out on each Tribune Publishing Company website where you want your choice to apply. • Your opt-out will not be recognized if you are in private, incognito or a similar mode. • Opt-outs may be stored via cookies. Clearing cookies will delete your opt-out, and you will need to opt out again for your choices to be effective. • This opt-out does not apply to our mobile apps. To opt-out in the mobile app environment, please click on the “Do Not Sell My Info” link in the Settings menu of our mobile app. • Tribune Publishing Company does not maintain or control this opt-out mechanism and is not responsible for its operation. These rights only apply to California residents, and if we reasonably determine you are not a California resident your selection may be reset.

These cookies collect information about how visitors use the website, for instance which pages visitors go to most often, and if they get error messages from web pages. These cookies don’t collect information that identifies a visitor. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. It is only used to improve how a website works.

Diablo 2: Resurrected Review in Progress - IGN

Silver And Black Pride 23 September, 2021 - 03:42pm

Diablo 2: Resurrected has arrived, and I've had a couple of days’ head start. I've been smashing demons aside for enough hours that I’m now breaking into Act 3 and I am absolutely not bored – I'm honestly delighted. I probably played hundreds (but I'd wager less than a thousand) hours of Diablo 2 between 2000 and 2007, and Resurrected absolutely scratches an itch for a style of game that's not really made anymore – not just aesthetically, but mechanically. It’s all coming back.

I mean, the mood of this game is just superb. The updated graphics do so much more than a simple homage to the original game, adding environment details that were just out of the question in 2000. Locations like the Monastery Gates in Act 1, an outdoor area that was always a bit weird from an isometric point of view, now have visible roofs on the buildings instead of just a black sea beyond the walls. There’s a wealth of detail in every scene, and in the character models, that really makes me appreciate the ability to dynamically switch between the old and new graphics to see the contrast.

Have you played Diablo II: Resurrected?

Beautifully, when you switch to the classic graphics you switch to the original sound as well, though the difference is nowhere near as stark here because it didn’t need any significant updating. Aside from a bit of remastering it is identical to the original, and it’s still phenomenal. The ping when a gem hits the floor, the whirl of weapons, and the guttural demon voices ("Rakanishu!") are iconic sound design. This is not to mention the remasters of the classic soundtrack, or the new remixes, which are beautiful work. (The voice acting, well... let's just say it was a different time.)

I've chosen Paladin as my first character. This is because, for two decades, I’ve maintained a personal grudge against the dung beetle soldiers in Act 2 – you know, the ones that poop lightning when you hit them. The Paladin's lightning resistance aura allows me to laugh in their faces and kill them in humiliating ways, and it’s been everything I thought it could be.

There’s no shortage of options, and part of the delight of Diablo 2 is that it has a weird skill system you can use to build some truly strange characters. It's flexible enough that you can make ranged builds for the melee characters, like a crossbow Paladin that shoots explosive bolts. How about a Barbarian focused on the War Cry skill, who just runs around shouting until everything dies? How about a Sorceress who enchants weapons rather than nukes enemies from a distance? I've always wanted to try and make a Necromancer tank, personally – maybe I’ll finally get around to it.

There’s a ton of freedom… that is, if you're willing to discard 20 years of accumulated Diablo 2 wisdom. In many ways this game is “solved,” in that the best builds and their precise itemization have been thoroughly sussed out over the years. You're welcome to play like it's 2000 and not search up optimal builds, of course.

However, while I'd normally encourage you to go in blind and experiment for yourself, I won't in this case because some of Diablo 2's design hasn't aged well. For example, there are copious skill traps for new players, meaning that some abilities you might choose don't scale well past the early game, or aren't useful unless you understand their synergies with other skills you won’t unlock until much later. Some things, like the infamous Next Hit Always Misses bug, have been retained in the name of keeping the flavor of Diablo 2 the same, but that’s something few people know about unless they do their homework. Hopefully this faithfulness to the original’s bugs have limits: I haven't been able to check whether the Amazon's Fend or Druid's Fury skills are still bugged, but it would be a major missed opportunity if Blizzard didn’t fix them, as that'd open up character builds that have been ignored for 20 years because of a simple technical problem.

It's worth saying that I've encountered barely any new bugs specific to Resurrected, and those I have seen have been minor graphical glitches that don't affect gameplay – things like doors that don't change visually when opened but can still be passed through, or an object overlaying a texture strangely.

I’m a little sad to see that Resurrected has retained Diablo 2’s arcane skill-reset system: You get just one respec per difficulty level, and the only way to get more is by farming the big bosses for rare items and then shoving them in your Horadric Cube. Unlimited respecs would've been a prime candidate for overhaul to make Resurrected more accessible to a new generation and mitigate the skill trap issue, and it’s something that could have been easily disabled for ladder play.

It's a bit galling things like that weren’t addressed because the other big update in Diablo 2: Resurrected is a similar quality-of-life change. Rather than picking up gold stack by stack, you instead automatically grab it when you pass by. There's a difference between preserving the experience and a lack of respect for the player's time, and this change shows that a small tweak can go a long way towards removing tedium from the original game without ruining anything.

The moment-to-moment gameplay that made Diablo 2 legendary in its time, though, is completely unchanged. Exploration and combat still feel deeply familiar; it’s a festival of clicking (or, now, thumbsticking) where you want to go and hammering out hits on your enemies. It's as wild and chaotic as an isometric action RPG ever is, but in the long view, over 20 years of game design innovation later, it's also kind of… slow. Characters don't move quickly, and running is limited by your stamina bar. Copious and consistent use of town portal scrolls generally avoids having to backtrack, but when you have to it's annoying at best. Running also makes your character worse at blocking, if they have a shield – though Diablo 2 will never tell you this.

I've got other problems, myself: How can you justify dropping LAN play? Why can't I clone a multiplayer character into single-player? The latter is especially concerning, seeing as the launch day servers aren't behaving themselves. The wait to start an online world is long for everyone, and others are reporting that when disconnected their characters have disappeared. Fortunately, unlike Diablo 3’s memorably terrible launch, we can still play offline while we wait for Blizzard to sort it out.

But none of those devils in the details has overcome the fact that I'm definitely having fun. Diablo 2's design has aged remarkably well as an example of a relatively uncomplicated isometric action RPG. Everyone has skills, yes, but they all interact with the same systems: Health, Mana, Stats. There's no unique currency or meter to learn for every class, just a skill tree, a billion demons, and an infinite fountain of equipment. It is, as ever, a satisfying game.

Watch this space. I'll keep you updated in the coming days as I dive into Act 3 and beyond. For now, please excuse me: I have to go show Mephisto the door.

Diablo 2: Resurrected Review in Progress - IGN

Miami Dolphins 23 September, 2021 - 03:42pm

Diablo 2: Resurrected has arrived, and I've had a couple of days’ head start. I've been smashing demons aside for enough hours that I’m now breaking into Act 3 and I am absolutely not bored – I'm honestly delighted. I probably played hundreds (but I'd wager less than a thousand) hours of Diablo 2 between 2000 and 2007, and Resurrected absolutely scratches an itch for a style of game that's not really made anymore – not just aesthetically, but mechanically. It’s all coming back.

I mean, the mood of this game is just superb. The updated graphics do so much more than a simple homage to the original game, adding environment details that were just out of the question in 2000. Locations like the Monastery Gates in Act 1, an outdoor area that was always a bit weird from an isometric point of view, now have visible roofs on the buildings instead of just a black sea beyond the walls. There’s a wealth of detail in every scene, and in the character models, that really makes me appreciate the ability to dynamically switch between the old and new graphics to see the contrast.

Have you played Diablo II: Resurrected?

Beautifully, when you switch to the classic graphics you switch to the original sound as well, though the difference is nowhere near as stark here because it didn’t need any significant updating. Aside from a bit of remastering it is identical to the original, and it’s still phenomenal. The ping when a gem hits the floor, the whirl of weapons, and the guttural demon voices ("Rakanishu!") are iconic sound design. This is not to mention the remasters of the classic soundtrack, or the new remixes, which are beautiful work. (The voice acting, well... let's just say it was a different time.)

I've chosen Paladin as my first character. This is because, for two decades, I’ve maintained a personal grudge against the dung beetle soldiers in Act 2 – you know, the ones that poop lightning when you hit them. The Paladin's lightning resistance aura allows me to laugh in their faces and kill them in humiliating ways, and it’s been everything I thought it could be.

There’s no shortage of options, and part of the delight of Diablo 2 is that it has a weird skill system you can use to build some truly strange characters. It's flexible enough that you can make ranged builds for the melee characters, like a crossbow Paladin that shoots explosive bolts. How about a Barbarian focused on the War Cry skill, who just runs around shouting until everything dies? How about a Sorceress who enchants weapons rather than nukes enemies from a distance? I've always wanted to try and make a Necromancer tank, personally – maybe I’ll finally get around to it.

There’s a ton of freedom… that is, if you're willing to discard 20 years of accumulated Diablo 2 wisdom. In many ways this game is “solved,” in that the best builds and their precise itemization have been thoroughly sussed out over the years. You're welcome to play like it's 2000 and not search up optimal builds, of course.

However, while I'd normally encourage you to go in blind and experiment for yourself, I won't in this case because some of Diablo 2's design hasn't aged well. For example, there are copious skill traps for new players, meaning that some abilities you might choose don't scale well past the early game, or aren't useful unless you understand their synergies with other skills you won’t unlock until much later. Some things, like the infamous Next Hit Always Misses bug, have been retained in the name of keeping the flavor of Diablo 2 the same, but that’s something few people know about unless they do their homework. Hopefully this faithfulness to the original’s bugs have limits: I haven't been able to check whether the Amazon's Fend or Druid's Fury skills are still bugged, but it would be a major missed opportunity if Blizzard didn’t fix them, as that'd open up character builds that have been ignored for 20 years because of a simple technical problem.

It's worth saying that I've encountered barely any new bugs specific to Resurrected, and those I have seen have been minor graphical glitches that don't affect gameplay – things like doors that don't change visually when opened but can still be passed through, or an object overlaying a texture strangely.

I’m a little sad to see that Resurrected has retained Diablo 2’s arcane skill-reset system: You get just one respec per difficulty level, and the only way to get more is by farming the big bosses for rare items and then shoving them in your Horadric Cube. Unlimited respecs would've been a prime candidate for overhaul to make Resurrected more accessible to a new generation and mitigate the skill trap issue, and it’s something that could have been easily disabled for ladder play.

It's a bit galling things like that weren’t addressed because the other big update in Diablo 2: Resurrected is a similar quality-of-life change. Rather than picking up gold stack by stack, you instead automatically grab it when you pass by. There's a difference between preserving the experience and a lack of respect for the player's time, and this change shows that a small tweak can go a long way towards removing tedium from the original game without ruining anything.

The moment-to-moment gameplay that made Diablo 2 legendary in its time, though, is completely unchanged. Exploration and combat still feel deeply familiar; it’s a festival of clicking (or, now, thumbsticking) where you want to go and hammering out hits on your enemies. It's as wild and chaotic as an isometric action RPG ever is, but in the long view, over 20 years of game design innovation later, it's also kind of… slow. Characters don't move quickly, and running is limited by your stamina bar. Copious and consistent use of town portal scrolls generally avoids having to backtrack, but when you have to it's annoying at best. Running also makes your character worse at blocking, if they have a shield – though Diablo 2 will never tell you this.

I've got other problems, myself: How can you justify dropping LAN play? Why can't I clone a multiplayer character into single-player? The latter is especially concerning, seeing as the launch day servers aren't behaving themselves. The wait to start an online world is long for everyone, and others are reporting that when disconnected their characters have disappeared. Fortunately, unlike Diablo 3’s memorably terrible launch, we can still play offline while we wait for Blizzard to sort it out.

But none of those devils in the details has overcome the fact that I'm definitely having fun. Diablo 2's design has aged remarkably well as an example of a relatively uncomplicated isometric action RPG. Everyone has skills, yes, but they all interact with the same systems: Health, Mana, Stats. There's no unique currency or meter to learn for every class, just a skill tree, a billion demons, and an infinite fountain of equipment. It is, as ever, a satisfying game.

Watch this space. I'll keep you updated in the coming days as I dive into Act 3 and beyond. For now, please excuse me: I have to go show Mephisto the door.

Sports Stories

JCPenney