California pastor delivers sermon urging Newsom’s recall — a test of IRS rules for churches

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Sacramento Bee 02 August, 2021 - 05:00pm 58 views

When is the recall for Gavin Newsom?

The 2021 California gubernatorial recall election is an upcoming special election on whether to recall Governor Gavin Newsom scheduled to be held on September 14, 2021, with every voter set to receive a mail-in ballot, beginning August 16, 2021. wikipedia.org2021 California gubernatorial recall election

36 percent: That’s the percentage of registered voters in California who said they’d vote to support the recall of Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, per last week’s LA Times/Berkeley IGS poll.

If that 36 percent looks familiar, well, it’s the exact same percentage of registered voters who backed the recall in April and January, per the same poll, suggesting a limited ceiling of recall supporters in the state.

It’s also close to the percentage Donald Trump got in the state in 2020 (34 percent), and that GOP gubernatorial nominee John Cox got against Newsom in 2018 (38 percent).

47 percent: That’s the percentage of likely voters from the same poll who said they’d vote to support Newsom’s recall, suggesting that Republicans have the enthusiasm and turnout advantage with six weeks to go.

By contrast, 50 percent of likely voters said they’d vote against the recall.

That early GOP enthusiasm/turnout advantage is one reason why Newsom supporters are airing this ad featuring Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.: They need to fire up their own base voters.

“We've seen Trump Republicans across the country attacking election results and the right to vote,” Warren says to camera in the ad. “Now they're coming to grab power in California, abusing the recall process and costing taxpayers millions.”

(Note: If this Trump/election message doesn’t work to fire up voters in California ahead of Sept. 14, that could be alarming news for Terry McAuliffe and Virginia Democrats heading into November).

More than 200-to-1: That’s the ad-spending advantage that Newsom and supporters have enjoyed over Republicans in the past month, according to data from AdImpact.

Newsom & Co. have spent $5.9 million in advertising from July 1 to Aug. 2, while Republicans and recall backers have spent just $27,500 during that same time period.

And when you look at future ad buys (from Aug. 3 to Sept. 14), Democrats hold a 150-to-1 advantage, $13.3 million to $86,000.

Now we expect those GOP ad numbers to increase over the next six weeks. Still, that’s quite a financial disadvantage in this very expensive state.

Do Democrats have the overall numerical advantage in California? Yes.

Can Republicans make the recall competitive — or even win — because they have the intensity/enthusiasm/turnout edge in a September election? You bet.

And does the GOP face a real cash disadvantage right now? Absolutely.

“Senators introduced the long-awaited text of their bipartisan infrastructure bill Sunday, aiming to pass the massive measure this week,” per NBC News.

“Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he would push forward with amendments to the legislation, which senators were finalizing through the weekend.”

More: “The measure includes $555 billion in new spending to build roads, public transit and other priorities of President Joe Biden, which would inject a windfall of money into a series of transportation projects that have long enjoyed support from both parties. The bill, which is 2,702 pages, includes $110 billion for roads, $39 billion for public transit and $66 billion for rail.”

House Minority Leader McCarthy slammed for joking 'it would be hard not to hit' Speaker Pelosi with a gavel. https://t.co/VmMxuLaPuk

Almost 550 million: How many Covid vaccines short of the original estimates that Covax, the global attempt for vaccine equity, had delivered through June, per the New York Times.

6,400: The number of people fatally shot by police since 2015, according to a new investigation from The Washington Post.

35,034,150: The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States, per the most recent data from NBC News and health officials. (That’s 214,237 more than Friday morning.)

616,828: The number of deaths in the United States from the virus so far, per the most recent data from NBC News. (That’s 943 more than Friday morning.)

346,456,669: The number of vaccine doses administered in the U.S., per the CDC. (That’s 2,385,074 since Friday morning.)

49.6 percent: The share of all Americans who are fully vaccinated, per the CDC.

60.5 percent: The share of all American adults at least 18 years of age who are fully vaccinated, per CDC.

The Washington Post reports how President Biden has tried to assist the bipartisan infrastructure negotiations.

The Biden administration is opening the door to more Afghans to relocate to U.S. over Taliban danger.

House Democrats are pushing the responsibility onto the Biden administration for extending the eviction moratorium.

Simone Biles plans to compete in Olympics balance beam final.

Republicans are beginning to catch up with Democrats in online fundraising, creating for the first time in modern history a political landscape where both parties are largely funded by small donations.

The Atlantic has an excerpt from Alexander Vindman’s book about when the former National Security Council staffer overheard former President Trump’s infamous conversation with the Ukrainian president.

Ben Kamisar is a political writer for NBC News. 

Read full article at Sacramento Bee

The recall is part of a global search

San Francisco Chronicle 02 August, 2021 - 08:10pm

TOKYO — There is a new fastest man in the world.

Lamont Marcell Jacobs of Italy sprinted to Olympic gold in the men’s 100-meter dash on Sunday, finishing in 9.80 seconds. Jacobs, 26, was born in El Paso before moving to Italy with his mother as a young child.

Fred Kerley of the United States finished second in 9.84 seconds, and Andre De Grasse of Canada was third (9.89).

The event had long been dominated by Usain Bolt, who retired following the 2017 world championships after doubling as the 100- and 200-meter champion at three straight Olympics, from 2008 to 2016.

In a surprise, the field did not include Trayvon Bromell of the United States, who had the fastest lifetime best among the semifinalists: 9.77 seconds, which he had run in June.

But after struggling to a fourth-place finish in his opening-round heat on Saturday, he finished third in the second of three semifinals on Sunday, missing out on an automatic spot in the final by a thousandth of a second. The top four runners in the third semifinal were all faster than Bromell, knocking him out of the final.

The field was also absent another notable American: Christian Coleman, the reigning world champion, who is serving a suspension for a series of missed drug tests.

Opinion | In gubernatorial debate, will California Republicans self-destruct?

The Washington Post 02 August, 2021 - 08:10pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California could witness a stunning turnabout in a nation of deeply polarized politics if the liberal state dumps Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom and elects a Republican to fill his job in a September recall election.

With the country’s political center largely vanished, it’s rare to see governors win elections on adversarial ground, making the notion of a Republican upset in one of the nation’s Democratic strongholds seem implausible. Republicans haven’t won a statewide race in California since 2006.

But there are exceptions: Republican governors have defied the odds in solidly Democratic territory — Vermont, Massachusetts and Maryland. Their success looks even more striking when considering those states delivered the largest percentage victories for Joe Biden in the presidential election last year.

That could provide a dose of encouragement for Republican recall candidates, but the circumstances don’t square neatly with California, starting with the unavoidable shadow of former President Donald Trump.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker and Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan emphatically distanced themselves from Trump. Scott said he voted for Biden last year, Baker left his ballot blank and Hogan said he voted for Ronald Reagan, the former president who died in 2004.

“All three of those governors are pretty significant critics of Donald Trump,” noted Kyle Kondik, an analyst at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

In California, the leading GOP candidates have supported or have ties to Trump, who is widely unpopular in the state outside his conservative base. Trump lost California to Biden by over 5 million votes.

Newsom’s campaign is anchored to the slogan “stop the Republican recall” — an attempt to cast the election as a solely partisan effort, which it is not. Newsom’s chief political strategist routinely tweets a 2019 photograph of Republican candidate Kevin Faulconer, the former San Diego mayor, beside Trump at his desk in the Oval Office.

In California, “I think it would be hard to pitch yourself as a national kind of Republican” with Trump still exercising broad influence, Kondik added.

Marshall Cohen, political director at the Democratic Governors Association, said the California race is entirely different than the elections in Vermont, Massachusetts and Maryland.

Those governors “have been able to strongly push back against Trump and create political profiles outside the modern Republican Party,” Cohen said.

The Trump conundrum — he remains popular with the GOP base — is perhaps best witnessed in Republican California candidate Caitlyn Jenner, the former Olympian and reality TV personality.

Jenner supported Trump in 2016 but later clashed with his administration over transgender issues. Yet Jenner’s advisers have included former Trump campaign insiders. At her first news conference in July, she said she didn’t want Trump’s endorsement.

“I hope the Republican Party comes to me and becomes more inclusive,” she said.

Other top Republicans, including conservative talk radio host Larry Elder and businessman John Cox, who lost to Newsom in 2018, also were Trump supporters last year.

In an interview, Cox disputed that Trump was a force in the recall election, saying momentum to oust Newsom is coming from frustration with rising crime rates, water and energy shortages and the return of coronavirus restrictions.

“I’m my own person, and this race is not about Trump,” Cox said, arguing that Newsom is trying to use the former president as a political wedge “to get people angry all over again.”

Elder, who is Black, has said that to Newsom’s campaign, “everything is racism, dividing Americans.”

In Massachusetts, Baker, a social moderate who supports reproductive rights, has sought to avoid the divide of national politics and work across the political aisle, said his political adviser, Jim Conroy.

In an era of harsh partisanship in Washington, “it’s that difference that makes him appealing to people,” Conroy said.

With many voters unsettled by the pandemic and the status quo in Sacramento, Conroy thinks Republicans have an opening in California. If a candidate pairs a fiscally conservative agenda with calls for bipartisan solutions, “anyone can win with that message,” he said.

Vermont’s Scott also supports reproductive rights, while Hogan has made his mark by focusing on taxes and the economy, largely steering around entanglements on social issues.

Among leading Republican candidates in California, their core message is reversing the progressive policies on school choice, virus restrictions and just about everything.

Some, however, also have spoken out on cultural issues: Elder and state Assemblyman Kevin Kiley have derided critical race theory, which centers on the idea that racism is systemic in the nation’s institutions and that they function to maintain the dominance of white people in society.

There are other differences with California. Despite Democratic leanings, Eastern states have a history of electing moderate Republican governors, while California has been growing increasingly Democratic. GOP voter registration has withered to 24% statewide.

There also are quirks to the California recall election that could set the stage for an unexpected finish.

Recent polling suggests the race is tightening. Those surveys also point to a vexing trend for Democrats, whose voters appear to be blasé about the election.

In a recall, voters will be asked two questions: First, should Newsom be removed, yes or no? The second question will be a list of replacement candidates from which to choose. If a majority of voters approve Newsom’s removal, the candidate who gets the most votes on the second question becomes governor.

With 46 replacement candidates on the ballot, it’s possible a winner could emerge with as little as 20% of the vote should Newsom be recalled — a fraction of what a candidate would need in a typical statewide election.

It’s also allowed Republicans to largely target their campaigns at Republicans and right-leaning independents, which could provide a sufficient coalition to win in the Sept. 14 election.

Cox, a multimillionaire real estate investor who opposes abortion, says he sees himself in the mold of Hogan or Baker who “ran for governor as business guys.” California is under siege from homelessness, the rising cost of living and energy shortages, and “those are not cultural issues,” he said.

California Democrats fretting over voter turnout ahead of recall election

Newsweek 02 August, 2021 - 10:16am

Getting Democrats to vote in the upcoming election may not be as simple as it sounds. While Democratic registration is nearly twice that of Republicans in the state, party leaders are worried about Republicans' eagerness to push Newsom out, according to polling.

Complacency among Democrats, who might believe Newsom faces an easy victory, also has party leaders concerned. Some voters interviewed by the Associated Press said they planned to vote for Newsom. Many were aware of the recall but hadn't yet made up their minds. Others did not know when the election was scheduled or were apathetic about Newsom.

Interviews with about 20 voters across Sacramento, Fresno and Los Angeles reveal the challenges Newsom faces just two weeks before ballots start arriving in voters' mailboxes ahead of the September 14 contest.

The kind of voter Newsom needs to connect with is 37-year-old barber Dwayne Speed of Sacramento, who is a registered Democrat but has been thinking about switching to independent. He felt Newsom "pushed his own personal agenda" during the pandemic. But he isn't convinced by recall supporters either and hasn't decided how he will vote.

"I want to know every single basis that they're trying to recall him on," Speed said. "Nobody's going to have a job and do it 100 percent perfectly."

Among Newsom's challenges: Voters aren't used to elections in odd-numbered years, and certainly not in September. Many voters have turned away from television platforms that carry ads, and resurgent coronavirus rates could make people unwilling to answer a knock at the door from a campaign worker. But every voter will get a ballot in the mail, giving them an easy opportunity to participate.

The recall effort was launched by novice Republican activists last year before the pandemic took hold, and they successfully gathered more than the 1.5 million signatures required by state law to place it on the ballot. Their effort was initially seen as a long shot that drew little attention. But signatures spiked after Newsom was caught dining out at the high-end French Laundry restaurant in Northern California for a birthday party while urging people to stay home and avoid gatherings.

In Los Angeles, 24-year-old Nick Yi, a registered independent who is between jobs, said he hasn't been paying much attention to the recall, in part because he has been staying away from news to avoid accounts of Asian hate crimes, which he finds upsetting.

He expects to vote and tends to lean Democratic. But he doesn't have a strong impression of Newsom, calling him someone who is passionate and "Republicans don't like."

As Newsom's team looks to engage voters like Yi, they are spending significant time branding the effort as a partisan contest. The majority of his TV ads have made a case against the recall rather than one for Newsom, branding it as a "Republican power grab."

One ad shows a video of people storming the U.S. Capitol on January 6. In another, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts tells voters, "We've seen Trump Republicans across the country attacking election results and the right to vote. Now they're coming to grab power in California."

Democrats are openly sounding the alarm. Juan Rodriguez, campaign manager of the anti-recall effort, told the AP he is "very concerned" about turnout. In an interview with editorial boards for McClatchy's California newspapers, Newsom warned that the recall would have "profound consequences" heading into the 2022 midterm elections. The campaign has already sent 14 million text messages to voters, and Rodriguez said enthusiasm is increasing as Democrats learn more about the race.

Three months ago, Myra Coble of Fresno was a Democrat who was convinced Newsom couldn't be recalled. Now she's a volunteer with the county party trying to convince other Democrats not to rest on that assumption.

"Our fear is that in this election, Republicans will turn out and Democrats will be complacent because they think it can't happen," she said.

Democratic President Joe Biden won Fresno County with 53 percent of the vote in the 2020 presidential election. Though Fresno and other counties in the Central Valley are home to fewer voters than population power centers like San Diego and Los Angeles, Newsom has touted his commitment to the region throughout his governorship and traveled there regularly.

But his message doesn't always break through. Curtis Selland and Leslie Pugsley are two Fresno County Democrats who will vote to keep Newsom but aren't his biggest fans.

Pugsley, 57, applauded the job Newsom did during the early months of coronavirus when he acted quickly to shut down schools and businesses. But she thinks he comes off as a "snooty San Francisco liberal" who isn't genuine.

On the opposite end, Christina Grout, 37, is a Democrat and mother of two from Sacramento who is excited to support Newsom.

A disability justice advocate, she pays close attention to state politics and appreciated Newsom's handling of the pandemic. If anything, she would have liked to see him be more aggressive by keeping the state's mask mandate in place longer. The state dropped its mandate for vaccinated people on June 15. But on Wednesday, state officials began recommending people wear masks indoors again.

"I feel proud to be a Californian," Grout said.

Los Angeles County, meanwhile, could present Newsom's biggest challenge. It is home to more than 3 million Democrats and is a place where statewide elections can be won or lost. But voters often shrug at politics and can be especially difficult to get to the polls, even during a routine November election.

Outside a local library, independent Jonathan Montes, 22, said he plans to vote but is undecided about Newsom. He is troubled by climbing rents and the unchecked spread of homelessness. People could be seen slumped in doorways nearby, or splayed beneath trees.

He's going to give Newsom a close look before making a decision, but at this point "I would like to see someone else," Montes said. Newsom "hasn't lived up to expectations."

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California Democrats fretting over voter turnout ahead of recall election

KTLA Los Angeles 02 August, 2021 - 10:16am

Getting Democrats to vote in the upcoming election may not be as simple as it sounds. While Democratic registration is nearly twice that of Republicans in the state, party leaders are worried about Republicans' eagerness to push Newsom out, according to polling.

Complacency among Democrats, who might believe Newsom faces an easy victory, also has party leaders concerned. Some voters interviewed by the Associated Press said they planned to vote for Newsom. Many were aware of the recall but hadn't yet made up their minds. Others did not know when the election was scheduled or were apathetic about Newsom.

Interviews with about 20 voters across Sacramento, Fresno and Los Angeles reveal the challenges Newsom faces just two weeks before ballots start arriving in voters' mailboxes ahead of the September 14 contest.

The kind of voter Newsom needs to connect with is 37-year-old barber Dwayne Speed of Sacramento, who is a registered Democrat but has been thinking about switching to independent. He felt Newsom "pushed his own personal agenda" during the pandemic. But he isn't convinced by recall supporters either and hasn't decided how he will vote.

"I want to know every single basis that they're trying to recall him on," Speed said. "Nobody's going to have a job and do it 100 percent perfectly."

Among Newsom's challenges: Voters aren't used to elections in odd-numbered years, and certainly not in September. Many voters have turned away from television platforms that carry ads, and resurgent coronavirus rates could make people unwilling to answer a knock at the door from a campaign worker. But every voter will get a ballot in the mail, giving them an easy opportunity to participate.

The recall effort was launched by novice Republican activists last year before the pandemic took hold, and they successfully gathered more than the 1.5 million signatures required by state law to place it on the ballot. Their effort was initially seen as a long shot that drew little attention. But signatures spiked after Newsom was caught dining out at the high-end French Laundry restaurant in Northern California for a birthday party while urging people to stay home and avoid gatherings.

In Los Angeles, 24-year-old Nick Yi, a registered independent who is between jobs, said he hasn't been paying much attention to the recall, in part because he has been staying away from news to avoid accounts of Asian hate crimes, which he finds upsetting.

He expects to vote and tends to lean Democratic. But he doesn't have a strong impression of Newsom, calling him someone who is passionate and "Republicans don't like."

As Newsom's team looks to engage voters like Yi, they are spending significant time branding the effort as a partisan contest. The majority of his TV ads have made a case against the recall rather than one for Newsom, branding it as a "Republican power grab."

One ad shows a video of people storming the U.S. Capitol on January 6. In another, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts tells voters, "We've seen Trump Republicans across the country attacking election results and the right to vote. Now they're coming to grab power in California."

Democrats are openly sounding the alarm. Juan Rodriguez, campaign manager of the anti-recall effort, told the AP he is "very concerned" about turnout. In an interview with editorial boards for McClatchy's California newspapers, Newsom warned that the recall would have "profound consequences" heading into the 2022 midterm elections. The campaign has already sent 14 million text messages to voters, and Rodriguez said enthusiasm is increasing as Democrats learn more about the race.

Three months ago, Myra Coble of Fresno was a Democrat who was convinced Newsom couldn't be recalled. Now she's a volunteer with the county party trying to convince other Democrats not to rest on that assumption.

"Our fear is that in this election, Republicans will turn out and Democrats will be complacent because they think it can't happen," she said.

Democratic President Joe Biden won Fresno County with 53 percent of the vote in the 2020 presidential election. Though Fresno and other counties in the Central Valley are home to fewer voters than population power centers like San Diego and Los Angeles, Newsom has touted his commitment to the region throughout his governorship and traveled there regularly.

But his message doesn't always break through. Curtis Selland and Leslie Pugsley are two Fresno County Democrats who will vote to keep Newsom but aren't his biggest fans.

Pugsley, 57, applauded the job Newsom did during the early months of coronavirus when he acted quickly to shut down schools and businesses. But she thinks he comes off as a "snooty San Francisco liberal" who isn't genuine.

On the opposite end, Christina Grout, 37, is a Democrat and mother of two from Sacramento who is excited to support Newsom.

A disability justice advocate, she pays close attention to state politics and appreciated Newsom's handling of the pandemic. If anything, she would have liked to see him be more aggressive by keeping the state's mask mandate in place longer. The state dropped its mandate for vaccinated people on June 15. But on Wednesday, state officials began recommending people wear masks indoors again.

"I feel proud to be a Californian," Grout said.

Los Angeles County, meanwhile, could present Newsom's biggest challenge. It is home to more than 3 million Democrats and is a place where statewide elections can be won or lost. But voters often shrug at politics and can be especially difficult to get to the polls, even during a routine November election.

Outside a local library, independent Jonathan Montes, 22, said he plans to vote but is undecided about Newsom. He is troubled by climbing rents and the unchecked spread of homelessness. People could be seen slumped in doorways nearby, or splayed beneath trees.

He's going to give Newsom a close look before making a decision, but at this point "I would like to see someone else," Montes said. Newsom "hasn't lived up to expectations."

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