California Shattered Marijuana Tax Revenue Record In Latest Fiscal Year, State Reports

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Is weed legal in New Jersey?

Cannabis in New Jersey is legal for both medical use and recreational use. An amendment legalizing cannabis became part of the state constitution on January 1, 2021 and enabling legislation and related bills were signed into law by governor Phil Murphy on February 22, 2021. wikipedia.orgCannabis in New Jersey

New Mexico Officials File Marijuana Producer Rules And Will Accept License Applications This Week

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Colorado Governor Gives South Park Creators Marijuana-Themed License Plates Honoring ‘Tegridy’

GOP Congressman Who Voted Against Psychedelics Amendment Says MDMA Therapy ‘Sounds Amazing’

Bernie Sanders Talks Marijuana ‘Differences’ With Biden, Who He Says Could Enact Reforms But Chooses Not To

FDA says medical cannabis won’t jeopardize funding (Newsletter: August 24, 2021)

OH legal cannabis ballot petition certified (Newsletter: August 23, 2021)

Initial NJ cannabis rules approved (Newsletter: August 20, 2021)

IRS hosts cannabis & crypto panel (Newsletter: August 19, 2021)

GOP senator to press DEA on cannabis exemption (Newsletter: August 18, 2021)

Texas’s ban on the production and sale of smokeable hemp products is unconstitutional, a state district court declared on Monday.

In a major victory for the state’s hemp industry, Judge Lora Livingston of the 261st District Court ruled in favor of plaintiffs—a group of hemp businesses who sued the Texas Department of State Health Services over a ban on the manufacturing and selling of smokable cannabis products it imposed after the crop was legalized in 2019.

Livingston said in a decision letter that judgment “is granted in favor of the Plaintiffs,” without the need for further evidence or hearings. That means a series of Texas statutes prohibiting hemp manufacturing and sales will be fully invalidated after counsel submits final judgements for her to sign.

“We’re pleased with the result. This law never made any sense, was an unjustifiable infringement of liberty when enacted and would have seriously hurt the Texas hemp industry from farmers to consumers if allowed to move forward,” Matt Zorn, one of the lead attorneys on the case, told Marijuana Moment. “After a full trial, the court saw things our way and declared the statute unconstitutional under the Texas Constitution.”

Earlier this month, an appeals court had modified a prior injunction and determined that regulators couldn’t enforce a ban on the sales component of the smokeable hemp market. But now there’s a permanent injunction that bars the state from prohibiting the full range of hemp activity.

“As Texas makes its way out of the prohibition era, there will be good and bad policy decisions. This ruling shows that bad policy can be overturned,” Heather Fazio, director of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, told Marijuana Moment. “We can thank these outstanding cannabis attorneys and industry leaders who were willing to stand up for free enterprise and accountable government.”

Zorn said the plaintiffs based their case on a 2015 state Supreme Court ruling that maintained a law could be deemed unconstitutional if “the statute’s effect as a whole is so unreasonably burdensome that it becomes oppressive in relation to the underlying governmental interest.”

“Our position all along has been the manufacturing and processing ban didn’t make any sense,” Zorn said. However, he did say he expects the state to appeal once the judgment is finalized.

Zachary Maxwell, president of Texas Hemp Growers, said Monday’s ruling “is a major win for Texas’ hemp industry, and may set a new standard in similar cases across the country.”

The attorneys in the case “fought hard, brought fact-based arguments to the courtroom, and proved the undeniable financial harm caused by this cavalier ban,” he said in a press release.

Meanwhile, some activists are holding out hope that Texas lawmakers might pursue further reforms after a session that saw a number of drug policy developments. Marijuana activists in the state had called on the governor to put further expansions to the state’s medical cannabis program on the agenda for special legislative sessions he’s convened, for example, but that hasn’t happened.

While Gov. Greg Abbott (R) signed legislation in June to moderately expand the medical marijuana law by adding qualifying conditions and slightly increasing the THC limit for marijuana products, Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition (RAMP) and other advocates hoping to see further action.

Meanwhile, a newly established progressive group in the state called Ground Game Texas unveiled a campaign in June to put an initiative to decriminalize cannabis possession and ban no-knock warrants on this November’s ballot in Austin.

A strong majority of Texans back even broader reform, according to recent polling. Sixty percent of voters in the state support making cannabis legal “for any use,” signaling that local initiatives for more modest proposals like decriminalization will likely prevail where they qualify for local ballots.

With respect to the recently ended regular legislative session, advocates remain disappointed that they were unable to pass more expansive cannabis bills—including a decriminalization proposal that cleared the House but saw no action in the Senate.

Also this session, however, the governor allowed a bill to be enacted without his signature that will require the state to study the therapeutic potential of certain psychedelics for military veterans.

The House approved a cannabis decriminalization bill in 2019, but it did not advance in the Senate that session.

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FDA Says Iowa’s Medical Marijuana Law Doesn’t Risk Federal Funds For Academic Institutions

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Sacramento-based senior editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

New Mexico Officials File Marijuana Producer Rules And Will Accept License Applications This Week

North Carolina Senators Approve Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill In Committee

Snoop Dogg Says Sports Leagues Should Let Athletes Use Marijuana Instead Of Opioids

California Shattered Marijuana Tax Revenue Record In Latest Fiscal Year, State Reports

Idaho Supreme Court Gives 2022 Marijuana Legalization Initiative A Boost With Ruling On Signature Requirements

FDA says medical cannabis won’t jeopardize funding (Newsletter: August 24, 2021)

New Mexico regulators on Tuesday released an initial set of rules for the adult-use marijuana market as the state prepares to launch retail sales next year. And applications for producer licenses will start to be accepted within days.

Adults 21 and older are currently able to possess up to two ounces of cannabis and grow up to six mature plants for personal use under a law that was enacted earlier this year, but officials must still develop regulations for the commercial market. They took a key step to that end on Tuesday, and the rules for producers published in the New Mexico Register take effect immediately.

Rules for retailers, testing facilities and other cannabis sectors are still being developed and need to be finalized by January 1, 2022 in advance of the launch of sales by April.

“As a result of our open and collaborative process, these rules reflect the unique needs and perspectives of New Mexico residents, businesses, entrepreneurs and communities,” Regulation and Licensing Department Superintendent Linda Trujillo said in a press release.

Most of the new regulations concern licensing requirements, public safety, patient access and social equity.

For example, the Cannabis Control Division said it will ensure that 50 percent of marijuana producer licensees will meet its social equity standard, supporting communities that have been most impacted by the war on drugs.

It will also “solicit public input to create and implement a social and economic equity plan” and create that plan by October 15. It will “include guidelines to determine how to assess which communities have been disproportionately impacted, how to assess if a person is a member of a community disproportionately impacted, and proposed incentives to promote social and economic equity for applicants, licensees, and cannabis industry employees.”

“We are ready for business,” Trujillo said. “The Cannabis Control Division is committed to supporting licensees to maximize the economic opportunities that adult-use cannabis sales offer our state.”

Regulators said they will begin accepting producer license applications “later this week” ahead of a mandated September 1 deadline through a “streamlined online system.” They will have 90 days to approve or deny a license once a completed application is received.

The rules published in the New Mexico Register on Tuesday cover a lot of territory for producers. It sets out rules for licensing, security requirements, recalling and disposing cannabis products, transporting marijuana and testing for quality assurance.

There’s also a significant focus on ensuring that patients continue to have access to cannabis after the adult-use market opens up.

Marijuana shops must “make reasonable efforts to sell a minimum of twenty-five percent of their monthly cannabis sales to qualified patients, primary caregivers, and reciprocal participants,” according to the rules.

If there’s a cannabis shortage for patients, regulators would have the authority to take certain steps such as requiring retailers to set aside at least 10 percent of their products for the medical marijuana community or reducing the per plant fee for medical cannabis to incentivize such production.

There’s been some concern about whether New Mexico has the capacity to produce enough marijuana to meet the recreational market demand while still serving patients.

But regulators are nonetheless optimistic that they’re moving in the right direction to ensure a smooth rollout of the adult-use market while still protecting the state’s medical cannabis program.

John Blair, deputy superintendent at New Mexico’s Regulation Department, told KOAT that while there may be an initial surge in sales when the market opens up to adult-use consumers, there are provisions in the legalization law that ensure regulators “can control and ensure that every business is growing, selling, manufacturing a certain percentage of cannabis to maintain the strength and integrity of the medical cannabis industry.”

Trujillo said that the division is “on track and making good on our commitment to an efficient, open and transparent process to stand up this exciting new industry.”

“There is more work to do, but an important first step has been completed and we look forward to working with New Mexicans to stand up production facilities in the coming weeks,” she said.

There is no set limit on the number of business licensees that could be granted under the program, or the number of facilities a licensee could open, although regulators could stop issuing new licenses if an advisory committee determines that “market equilibrium is deficient.”

Cannabis purchases will include a 12 percent excise tax on top of the state’s regular eight percent sales tax. Beginning in 2025, the excise rate would climb by one percent each year until it reached 18 percent in 2030. Medical marijuana products, available only to patients and caretakers, would be exempt from the tax.

Local governments cannot ban cannabis businesses entirely, as some other states have allowed. Municipalities can, however, use their local zoning authority to limit the number of retailers or their distance from schools, daycares or other cannabis businesses.

Polling indicates New Mexico voters are ready for the policy change. A survey released in October found a strong majority of residents are in favor of legalization with social equity provisions in place, and about half support the decriminalization of drug possession more broadly.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) gave final approval to the cannabis legalization legislation in April, fulfilling a key goal for her administration. She had to convene a special session to ensure that lawmakers got the job done after they failed to pass legalization during the regular session.

A separate, complementary bill providing for expungements for convictions made legal under the marijuana legalization law was also passed during the special session and signed by the governor. Under it, courts must begin reopening qualifying cases within 30 days after the legislation goes into effect on January 1, 2022.

Regulators launched a website to provide information about legalization before the governor even signed the bill into law.

Lujan Grisham included cannabis legalization as part of her 2021 legislative agenda and has repeatedly talked about the need to legalize as a means to boost the economy, especially amid the coronavirus pandemic. She said during a State of the State address in January that “a crisis like the one we’ve experienced last year can be viewed as a loss or as an invitation to rethink the status quo—to be ambitious and creative and bold.”

Additional pressure to end cannabis prohibition this year came from neighboring Arizona, where sales officially launched in January after voters approved a legalization ballot initiative last year. To New Mexico’s north is Colorado, one of the first states to legalize for adult use.

New Mexico’s House in 2019 approved a legalization bill that included provisions to put marijuana sales mostly in state-run stores, but that measure died in the Senate. Later that year, Lujan Grisham created a working group to study cannabis legalization and issue recommendations.

In May of last year, the governor signaled she was considering actively campaigning against lawmakers who blocked her legalization bill in 2020. She also said that she was open to letting voters decide on the policy change via a ballot referendum if lawmakers didn’t send a legalization bill to her desk.

A North Carolina Senate committee on Tuesday approved a revised bill to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

This comes one week after the panel held a hearing to discuss the legislation and approve changes, but members did not vote at that prior meeting. Senators advanced the measure this time in a voice vote.

A previous version of the reform legislation cleared Judiciary and another committee last month, but it was rereferred earlier this month.

The bill must still clear the Senate Health Care and Rules and Operations Committees in order to reach the floor before potentially heading to the House of Representatives and then to the governor’s desk.

“We’re encouraged that SB711 has been advanced by the Judiciary Committee,” DeVaughn Ward, senior legislative counsel for the Marijuana Policy Project, told Marijuana Moment. “This a crucial hurdle that has been cleared on the road to full passage”.

Under the proposal, sponsored by Rules Committee Chairman Bill Rabon (R), patients would be allowed to access cannabis if they have a “debilitating medical condition” such as cancer, epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and post-traumatic stress disorder.

The committee substitute was changed to allow patients with terminal illnesses and have six months to live, as well as those with conditions resulting in hospice care, to also qualify for cannabis.

Patients could possess up to one and a half ounces of cannabis, but home cultivation would not be permitted.

The definition of what constitutes a “cannabis-infused” product was changed in the latest substitute version. Such products include “a tablet, a capsule, a concentrated liquid or viscous oil, a liquid suspension, a topical preparation, a transdermal preparation, a sublingual preparation, a gelatinous cube, gelatinous rectangular cuboid, lozenge in a cube or rectangular cuboid shape, a resin or wax.”

Smoking and vaping would also be allowed, but doctors would need to prescribe a specific method of delivery and dosages for patients under the revised legislation. And they would need to reevaluate patients’ eligibility for the program at least once a year.

The bill provides for up to 10 medical marijuana suppliers who control the cultivation and sale of cannabis. Each supplier can operate up to four dispensaries.

But advocates have taken issue with provisions on who would be eligible for such licenses, as the measure stipulates that applicants must provide documentation showing they have at least five years of experience “in cultivation, production, extraction, product development, quality control, and inventory management of medical cannabis in a state-licensed medical or adult use cannabis operation.”

Oh my goodness. Was that written by marijuana corporations? Is this a bill to regulate marijuana or to serve profits on a platter to out of state cannabis companies?

— Shaleen Title (@shaleentitle) August 24, 2021

That would effectively mean that the licenses and dispensaries would be exclusively operated by established, out-of-state marijuana businesses—a major issue for advocates who feel this unfairly alienates small, in-state businesses.

“Although we are in strong support of medical marijuana legalization and the relief it will bring to patients in North Carolina, we remain concerned about the lack of opportunities for small and independent businesses,” MPP’s Ward said.

During Tuesday’s hearing, members also accepted an amendment backed by the state attorney general’s office that clarifies issues related to probable cause for evidence obtained during searches.

Under the bill, a 13-member Compassionate Use Advisory Board would be established, and it could add new qualifying medical conditions.

Separately, a nine-member Medical Cannabis Production Commission would be created to ensure that there’s an adequate supply of cannabis for patients, oversee licensing and generate enough revenue to regulate the program.

Advocates are still hoping to see further revisions to expand the proposed program and promote social equity.

The measure would further create a North Carolina Cannabis Research Program to “undertake objective, scientific research regarding the administration of cannabis or cannabis-infused products as part of medical treatment.”

There are also protections for patients included in the latest version. It stipulates that employees and agents of the state must treat possession of cannabis for qualified patients the same as any other prescribed controlled substance.

Further, the bill includes limitations on where marijuana can be smoked or vaped, and includes restrictions on the locations and hours of operation for medical cannabis businesses. It also allows regulators to place a “limitation on the number of written certifications a physician may issue at any given time.”

A majority of North Carolina adults support legalizing marijuana for recreational use—and three in four say it should be legal for medical purposes—according to a poll released in February.

A separate medical cannabis bill, adult-use marijuana legalization measures and several pieces of cannabis decriminalization legislation have also been introduced in recent months—though they would likely face an uphill battle in the GOP-controlled legislature.

While advocates have their doubts about broad reform being enacted in North Carolina this session, Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger (R) recently acknowledged that opinions are shifting when it comes to marijuana in the state, and he said that Rabon specifically “for a long time has looked at the issue.”

“I do sense that public opinion is changing on marijuana—both medical and recreational,” Rabon said previously. “I don’t know where the members of the General Assembly are at this time in terms of support for the bill, but it’s something we’ll look at and we’ll see how things move along.”

Pressure to end criminalization is also building regionally.

Neighboring Virginia became the first state in the south to legalize marijuana for recreational use in April and that law took effect in July, for example. And the sponsor of a South Carolina medical cannabis legalization bill said he’s received assurances from a top Senate leader that his measure will be taken up as the first order of business at the beginning of next year.

A task force convened by North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) backed decriminalization as part of a series of policy recommendations on racial equity that were released late last year. The group also said prior cannabis convictions should be expunged and the state should consider whether to more broadly legalize marijuana.

Under current law, possessing more than half an ounce up to 1.5 ounces of cannabis is a class 1 misdemeanor, subject to up to 45 days imprisonment and a $200 fine. In 2019, there were 3,422 such charges and 1,909 convictions, with 70 percent of those convicted being nonwhite.

Idaho marijuana activists are breathing a sigh of relief after the state Supreme Court on Monday ruled that a law creating a more restrictive petitioning process for ballot initiatives is unconstitutional.

The governor signed a bill in April that made it so petitioners would’ve had to collect signatures from at least six percent of registered voters in all 35 of Idaho’s legislative districts, rather than 18 districts under previous rules, in order to qualify for the ballot.

That would’ve significantly strained a campaign to place a cannabis legalization initiative—the Personal Adult Marijuana Decriminalization Act (PAMDA)—before voters in 2022.

Idaho Supreme Court has ruled SB 1110 unconstitutional, restoring the 18-district signature rule and invalidating the July 1 implementation change to allow legislature to repeal passed initiatives. This ruling means we can proceed with our PAMDA "Legalize the Drive" initiative.

— Idaho Way (@IdahoWayInc) August 23, 2021

A separate medical marijuana legalization measure that activists are pushing was unaffected by the policy change because petitioners started collecting signatures earlier and were grandfathered in to the original 18-district requirement.

In any case, the court unanimously declared that the law, which took effect on July 1, unconstitutionally infringed of residents’ right to petition.

PAMDA (Legalize the Drive) can now qualify with just 18 districts! Huge news! https://t.co/rNoUg3f6pE

— 'Radical' Russ Belville — Idaho Cannabis Legalizer (@RadicalRuss) August 23, 2021

“We are excited that the Idaho Supreme Court recognized that SB1110 was an obviously unconstitutional attempt to kill petitioning rights,” Russ Belville, spokesperson for Legalize the Idaho Way, Inc. and chief petitioner of PAMDA, told Marijuana Moment. “With this ruling, we are now able to move forward with our PAMDA initiative to decriminalize marijuana purchased legally out of state while we continue to support the IMMA medical initiative.”

The ruling came in a case brought by the group Reclaim Idaho, which is behind a separate proposed initiative on education funding.

The Idaho Supreme Court has released an opinion in Gilmore v. Denney & Reclaim Idaho v. Denney, on the constitutionality of recent legislation involving the people's initiative and referendum powers. Read the opinion, concurrence & dissent here: https://t.co/1EdFmjvJ7f #idpol

— Idaho Supreme Court (@idcourts) August 23, 2021

The legalization initiative, which was certified and cleared for signature gathering last month, would be fairly limited in scope compared to those that have passed in other states. It would make it so possession of up to three ounces of marijuana would be lawful on private property for adults 21 and older.

Home cultivation would be prohibited, however, and there would be no legal and licensed system of cannabis retailers. The idea is for consumers to be able to buy cannabis in neighboring states that have legal retail operations and then bring the product back to Idaho to be consumed privately at home.

Advocates have until May 1, 2022 to collect about 65,000 valid signatures from registered voters to put the measure on the ballot.

Belville previously told Marijuana Moment that this proposal was partly motivated by a Nebraska Supreme Court decision last year to invalidate a voter-approved initiative to legalize medical cannabis based on a statutory single-subject rule.

Activists in Idaho attempted to get a medical marijuana measure before voters for the 2020 election, but they ultimately ditched the effort due to signature gathering complications caused by the coronavirus pandemic and the state’s refusal to provide petitioning accommodations.

Idaho is just one of several states where activists are working to put marijuana measures on the ballot in 2022.

All the cannabis news you need, all in one place. Copyright © 2017-2021 Marijuana Moment LLC ® and Tom Angell

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NJ legal weed: Dispensaries barred from selling edibles 'resembling food' — for now

Asbury Park Press 25 August, 2021 - 04:10am

An official summary of the CRC rules notes that "edible products resembling food are prohibited" from sale in any retail cannabis business in the state, with cookies and brownies specifically mentioned. 

"Ingestible forms ... shall only include syrups, pills, tablets, capsules, and chewable forms," the CRC regulations state. The panel approved the measure in a meeting Thursday.

Edibles have become increasingly popular among cannabis consumers in states with recreational markets, at times growing even faster than the cannabis industry itself. 

CRC Executive Director Jeff Brown said Monday that some "gummies" would be permitted under the regulations, like the soft lozenges already available at some medical marijuana dispensaries. 

But trying to regulate how edibles manufactured in a "kitchen environment," like baked goods, require additional regulations the commission didn't have time to detail before its Aug. 22 deadline to adopt an initial set of rules and regulations, under the New Jersey legal weed laws.

"That's not to say we won't in the future but, as of right now, we're starting out with just the addition of some things like concentrates," Brown said. "This is just the first cut." 

While many entrepreneurs expected the CRC to institute strict rules on labeling and packaging of edible products to ensure they don't attract children, many were planning for edibles to become a booming part of the New Jersey cannabis market from the get-go.

According to the cannabis analytics firm Headset, more than $1.23 billion of recreational and medical marijuana edibles were sold in seven states in 2020, a 60% uptick in sales that outpaced the rest of the cannabis industry.

"Edibles are a popular category for consumers that may not want to smoke, vape or put something in their lungs — or their landlords don't allow them to smoke or vape," Nison said. "They're certainly an important category for consumers, and they're capable of making choices for themselves."

If the CRC rules stand, New Jersey would be the only legal weed state to specifically ban such edible forms of marijuana.

Restrictions on edibles, however, are not uncommon: More and more states — including New Jersey — have passed laws or regulations ensuring that edible forms of marijuana aren't given eye-catching shapes, such as fruit snacks.

Those restrictions were always expected in New Jersey. In a 2019 interview with the Asbury Park Press, Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, said such measures would help to win over reluctant lawmakers.

"You have to make it unattractive to children," Sweeney said at the time.

Rules for recreational marijuana production now in place

KRQE 25 August, 2021 - 04:10am

The Cannabis Control Division will begin accepting license applications for recreational marijuana later this week. Rules for retailers are still in the works, it all must be finalized by the start of next year. Cannabis sales will start no later than April 1.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Even though the school district has paid Robotics $5.3 million over the last 15 years, the only one at APS who seems to know anything about the company is Sheryl Williams Stapleton. When an APS employee questioned the company's services, Williams Stapleton reportedly asked, "Why are you guys looking into Robotics?"

New Mexico lawmakers set aside $280-million during January's legislative session for two different extended school programs districts could use to make up for lost learning time during the pandemic. One program adds ten school days to the year and the other is K-5 Plus which adds 25 school days for students in kindergarten through fifth grade. "So we have seen a trend where many districts are opting in to extended learning for 10 days, not as many for K-5 Plus," said the New Mexico Public Education Department Deputy Secretary Katarina Sandoval.

A recent Larry Barker investigation exposed another connection between the new allegations against Williams Stapleton and concerns in 2012 surrounding a prior capital outlay expenditure. Barker recently sat down with KRQE News 13 Digital Anchor Chris McKee to discuss the investigation.

FDA says medical cannabis won't jeopardize funding (Newsletter: August 24, 2021)

Marijuana Moment 25 August, 2021 - 04:10am

New Mexico Officials File Marijuana Producer Rules And Will Accept License Applications This Week

North Carolina Senators Approve Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill In Committee

Idaho Supreme Court Gives 2022 Marijuana Legalization Initiative A Boost With Ruling On Signature Requirements

Why Most New Jersey Municipalities Are Banning Marijuana Shops Despite Overwhelming Public Support

Texas Ban On Smokeable Hemp Manufacturing And Sales Is Unconstitutional, Judge Rules

Wisconsin University Launches Psychedelics Center With Goal Of Increasing Diversity In Research

Psychedelics Can Help Mitigate Symptoms Of Racial Trauma For People Of Color, Study Finds

Michigan Spends $20M In Marijuana Revenue To Study Medical Cannabis For Veterans With PTSD

Senate Votes To Let Researchers Study Marijuana From Dispensaries

Marijuana Sales Increased In Multiple States During COVID, Study Finds

Snoop Dogg Says Sports Leagues Should Let Athletes Use Marijuana Instead Of Opioids

Sha’Carri Richardson Says She’d Be ‘Blessed’ If Her Marijuana Suspension Led To End Of The Ban For Other Athletes

NBA Star Kevin Durant Teams Up With Weedmaps To Destigmatize Marijuana In Sports

Rosario Dawson Joins Board Of Marijuana Business As Partner Cory Booker Pushes For Legalization In Senate

Half Of Americans Have Tried Marijuana, New Gallup Poll Finds

California Shattered Marijuana Tax Revenue Record In Latest Fiscal Year, State Reports

Feds Fund Research Into Hemp Fiber Insulation As Environmentally Friendly Alternative

Rosario Dawson Joins Board Of Marijuana Business As Partner Cory Booker Pushes For Legalization In Senate

IRS Hosts Marijuana And Cryptocurrency Tax Event That Highlights Legalization Support

Four States Report Record-Breaking Marijuana Sales In July

Snoop Dogg Says Sports Leagues Should Let Athletes Use Marijuana Instead Of Opioids

Sha’Carri Richardson Says She’d Be ‘Blessed’ If Her Marijuana Suspension Led To End Of The Ban For Other Athletes

Colorado Governor Gives South Park Creators Marijuana-Themed License Plates Honoring ‘Tegridy’

GOP Congressman Who Voted Against Psychedelics Amendment Says MDMA Therapy ‘Sounds Amazing’

Bernie Sanders Talks Marijuana ‘Differences’ With Biden, Who He Says Could Enact Reforms But Chooses Not To

FDA says medical cannabis won’t jeopardize funding (Newsletter: August 24, 2021)

OH legal cannabis ballot petition certified (Newsletter: August 23, 2021)

Initial NJ cannabis rules approved (Newsletter: August 20, 2021)

IRS hosts cannabis & crypto panel (Newsletter: August 19, 2021)

GOP senator to press DEA on cannabis exemption (Newsletter: August 18, 2021)

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

BREAKING: Journalism is often consumed for free, but costs money to produce! While this newsletter is proudly sent without cost to you, our ability to send it each day depends on the financial support of readers who can afford to give it. So if you’ve got a few dollars to spare each month and believe in the work we do, please consider joining us on Patreon today.

OH legal cannabis ballot petition certified (Newsletter: August 23, 2021)

Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 20-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

Free to read (but not free to produce)! We’re proud of our newsletter and the reporting we publish at Marijuana Moment, and we’re happy to provide it for free. But it takes a lot of work and resources to make this happen. 

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

All the cannabis news you need, all in one place. Copyright © 2017-2021 Marijuana Moment LLC ® and Tom Angell

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