Celebrate The End Of Summer With Monday's Harvest Moon

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NPR 18 September, 2021 - 07:58pm 42 views

What does full moon in Pisces mean?

What does the full Moon in Pisces mean, astrologically speaking? Each of the year's full Moons take on the character of the zodiac sign they falls in. This month's full Moon is in the sign of Pisces, a water sign known for its sympathetic outlook, dreaminess, and ability to intuitively connect with people. Oprah MagWhat September's Full Harvest Moon in Pisces Means For You

For those in the Northern Hemisphere, summer will come to an end next Wednesday. Slowly but surely since the middle of June, days have been getting shorter. With the arrival of the autumn equinox comes cooler weather and a change of color amongst the trees. And Monday, two days before the official start of fall, the harvest moon.

For three days, moonrise will come shortly after sunset, but the harvest moon will reach its peak illumination at 7:54 p.m. ET Monday. Historically this lunar event provided farmers a little extra light to harvest their crops. However, unlike the equinoxes, which take place at the same time each year, the harvest moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox. Which means it can fall in September or October, according to The Old Farmer's Almanac.

But that's not all that changes with the last full moon of the summer. You may recall glancing up at the night sky and noticed the moon varies in size from time to time. That's because the its orbit around the Earth isn't a perfect circle, NASA explains.

Sometimes the harvest moon appears to be enormous, such as in 2015, when it was the year's closest and biggest super moon. The moon appears so much larger during super moon events because it's closer to Earth, known as the perigee. At its closest point the moon is about 226,000 miles from Earth. But sometimes the harvest moon occurs when the moon is furthest from Earth in orbit, the apogee, at 253,000 miles away.

If spectators catch the moon rising at just the right time, it will appear orange in color. But this theatrical touch isn't specific to the harvest moon. The moon varies in color depending on a handful of factors, including where the viewer is standing. When Earth's satellite is closest to the horizon it takes on a red or yellow color, NASA says. But as it continues to rise it will gradually take on its traditional pale, white color.

East Asian culture celebrates the August Moon Festival, which doesn't always coincide with the rising of the harvest moon itself. According to the Boston Public Library, the festival can be traced back to 771 B.C. and was celebrated by harvesting rice and wheat on the night of the full moon. Similar to Thanksgiving in the United States, the August moon is celebrated by the gathering of friends and families, but instead of turkey, people eat mooncakes, a sweet and savory dessert.

Read full article at NPR

Full September harvest moon to shine as first day of fall looms

NJ.com 18 September, 2021 - 03:00pm

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Full September harvest moon to shine as first day of fall looms

Women's Health 18 September, 2021 - 03:00pm

Full September harvest moon to shine as first day of fall looms

Oregon Coast Beach Connection 18 September, 2021 - 03:00pm

The full moon of September 2021 will be shining in the night sky this week, just in time for the official start of fall as the autumn equinox arrives.

Better known as the “harvest moon,” the September moon will officially reach its fullest phase at 7:54 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 20. But it will look big and bright for a few days.

The moon will be 98% full on Sunday, 100% full Monday and Tuesday, and 98% full on Wednesday, Sept. 22 — the first official day of fall, known as the autumn equinox or autumnal equinox.

ALSO: Fall foliage forecast is looking ‘vibrant’ in parts of eastern U.S.

The equinox occurs when the sun rises directly over the equator, bringing an almost equal amount of daylight and darkness hours in the northern and southern hemispheres on that calendar day.

The full moon of September, known as the harvest moon, will be biggest and brightest on Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. It also will be 100% full on Tuesday, Sept. 21.Shutterstock

The best time to see the September harvest moon will be when it begins to rise in the eastern sky at about 7:15 p.m. Eastern time Monday, 20 minutes after the sun sets, and as it starts to rise at 7:36 p.m. on Tuesday.

The near-full moon will be rising Sunday at 6:48 p.m. and Wednesday at 7:59 p.m.

September’s full moon has a nickname related to the growing season. During most years, it is called the “harvest moon,” but sometimes that nickname is reserved for the October full moon.

It all depends on which of those two full moons appears closest to date of the autumn equinox.

Because this year’s full moon will appear on the night of Sept. 20, two days before autumn arrives, it will be called a harvest moon.

Last year, the September full moon appeared on Sept. 1, followed by another full moon on Oct. 1. “Because October 1 was closer to the equinox, October’s full moon was called the harvest moon and September’s full moon took on its traditional name: the corn moon,” the Old Farmer’s Almanac noted.

In addition to those nicknames, some native American tribes call the September full moon the barley moon, “because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley,” the Old Farmer’s Almanac says.

Space.com says the September full moon was known as the “falling leaves moon” among the Ojibwe tribe in the Great Lakes region, while the Cree of Ontario referred to this moon as the “rutting moon” because September was the time when many animals, particularly deer, started their mating.

The September harvest moon will officially reach its full phase on Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. It also will be 100% full on Tuesday, Sept. 21.SL

Last year, because of the lunar cycle’s timing, we had a special treat during the Halloween season — two full moons in October, including one on Oct. 31.

But this year, things will return to normal, with just one full moon in October. The so-called “hunter’s moon” will be shining at its fullest phase at 10:56 a.m. on Oct. 20, 2021.

The final full moons of 2021 will be shining in the sky on Nov. 19 and Dec. 18.

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When To See 2021’s Full Harvest Moon In Littleton

Patch.com 18 September, 2021 - 12:20pm

LITTLETON, CO — If you need a bright sign that summer is coming to an end in Littleton, just look to the skies next week as the 2021 full harvest moon rises over our town.

This year's harvest moon will occur on Monday. The moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Sunday morning through Tuesday morning.

This year's harvest moon falls just two days before the autumn equinox on Wednesday. The moon will reach peak illumination in the sky at 5:54 p.m.

Depending on the year, the full harvest moon usually happens up to two weeks before or after the autumn equinox, according to EarthSky.org. It's either the last full moon of summer or the first full moon of fall.

The harvest moon typically occurs in September, taking the place of the full corn moon. However, if it happens in October, it replaces the full hunter's moon.

The harvest moon rises at sunset and will continue for several nights in a row due to the time between sunset and the moonrise being at a yearly minimum. This will make it seem like there's a full moon for multiple nights in a row.

The origin of the harvest moon can be linked to the Native Americans, who looked to this full moon each autumn as a sign it was time to harvest their crops, according to the Farmers' Almanac. For a few days before and after it reaches its fullest point, the moon hangs in the sky like a glowing lantern, prolonging the light well after sunset.

Some trace the moon's moniker back to farmers, according to EarthSky.org. In the days before tractor lights, the harvest moon helped farmers gather their crops as daylight hours lessened, illuminating the fields through the night.

Is the harvest moon bigger or brighter than other moons? It depends.

The harvest moon's distance from Earth is different each year. Last year, the harvest moon was the second-smallest full moon of 2020, according to EarthSky.org. In 2019, the harvest moon was actually a mini-moon, or the most distant and smallest-appearing full moon of the year 2019. In 2015, however, the harvest moon was the year's closest and largest-appearing supermoon.

The harvest moon is known to take on an orange hue as it rises. This happens because when you look to the horizon rather than up and overhead, you're looking through a greater thickness of Earth's atmosphere.

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What is the Harvest Moon effect?

Astronomy Magazine 17 September, 2021 - 12:00am

The Full Moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox has a special name: the Harvest Moon. This year, the Harvest Moon falls just a few days before the equinox, on Monday, September 20, at 7:55 P.M. EDT. And because of some nifty celestial geometry, it brings with it a special effect called, appropriately, the Harvest Moon effect.

What is the Harvest Moon effect? Put simply, it’s a span of several days during which the Full (or nearly Full) Moon rises at almost the same time each night. This means several nights in a row receive lots of bright moonlight — a boon to farmers working hard to bring in the harvest before the advent of artificial lights.

Okay, so what’s really going on? As the Moon circles Earth, we see its changing phases as the amount of illumination it receives from the Sun also changes. When it is Full, it sits directly opposite the Sun, rising around sunset and setting around sunrise. On any two successive nights, moonrise generally varies by about 50 minutes as our satellite goes from New to Full and New again. Then the cycle repeats.

But that 50-minute change from day to day is only an average. And it’s related to the angle of the Moon’s orbit with respect to Earth’s equator — because unlike many satellites in the solar system, our Moon doesn’t orbit Earth’s equator. Around the vernal equinox, which kicks off spring in the Northern Hemisphere, that interval can stretch to a 70-minute change in moonrise times from night to night. And around the autumnal equinox, it shrinks to just 20 minutes or so. (Note that these times and dates are flipped for the Southern Hemisphere, which gets the most moonlight around the vernal equinox and the least around the autumnal equinox.)

What’s happening now is the Moon is rising further north each day, which translates to — for those north of the equator at this time of year — smaller changes in the time of moonrise from day to day. That’s because the Moon’s orbit is tilted the smallest amount to the horizon or, put another way, appears most parallel with the horizon at this time.

Your latitude above or below the equator affects the magnitude of the Harvest Moon effect. This week, the farther north you live, the bigger the effect, and the closer together subsequent moonrises appear, and for longer. For example, check out the moonrise times listed below in Chicago, Illinois (at 42° N), compared with those in Fairbanks, Alaska (65° N) over the next week. In Chicago, the Moon will rise a maximum of just 22 minutes later each day for about three days in a row. But in Fairbanks, where the Moon rises earlier each day, subsequent moonrises are just 6 minutes apart for most of the week.

The Full Moon is one of the easiest objects in the sky to observe. Because it rises around sunset, there’s no need to stay up late; alternatively, if you’re an early riser, it’s easy to catch just before sunrise. And, in fact, watching the Moon rise or set against any earthly backdrop gives you a chance to observe another effect, called the Moon illusion, which makes our satellite appear larger near the horizon than at zenith.

Researchers disagree on the exact reason this occurs; or perhaps it may differ from person to person, or depend on your observing conditions and location. Regardless of the reason, the illusion is most pronounced when the Moon is Full. And it is an illusion, the Moon isn’t changing apparent size over the course of a single night. However, the Moon does change apparent size as it goes from perigee to apogee — the closest and farthest points from Earth in its slightly elliptical orbit around our planet.

When the Moon is Full, its nearside (the only side we see from Earth) is on broad display. Most prominent are its large, circular maria, or seas. These weren’t ever filled with water but are instead ancient lava flows. They are also the youngest parts of the lunar surface and the regions NASA chose to send astronauts during its six manned Apollo landings. The Seas of Serenity, Tranquillity, Fertility, and Crises are the most prominent in the lunar east, which appears on our satellite’s right side when viewed from Earth’s Northern Hemisphere. In the lunar west, the Seas of Showers and Clouds, as well as the Ocean of Storms, loom largest. Tycho is perhaps the most prominent crater, spreading broad streaks, called rays, across the lunar south. Other noteworthy craters include, moving clockwise from Tycho, Byrgius (lunar southwest), Copernicus (lunar west), and Langrenus (lunar east).

Enjoying the Full Moon is an easy and fun activity for observers of all ages and experience levels. So, while the Harvest Moon is lighting the sky this week, make sure to enjoy the start of fall with a spectacular celestial show!

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.

What is the Harvest Moon effect?

WABC-TV 17 September, 2021 - 12:00am

The Full Moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox has a special name: the Harvest Moon. This year, the Harvest Moon falls just a few days before the equinox, on Monday, September 20, at 7:55 P.M. EDT. And because of some nifty celestial geometry, it brings with it a special effect called, appropriately, the Harvest Moon effect.

What is the Harvest Moon effect? Put simply, it’s a span of several days during which the Full (or nearly Full) Moon rises at almost the same time each night. This means several nights in a row receive lots of bright moonlight — a boon to farmers working hard to bring in the harvest before the advent of artificial lights.

Okay, so what’s really going on? As the Moon circles Earth, we see its changing phases as the amount of illumination it receives from the Sun also changes. When it is Full, it sits directly opposite the Sun, rising around sunset and setting around sunrise. On any two successive nights, moonrise generally varies by about 50 minutes as our satellite goes from New to Full and New again. Then the cycle repeats.

But that 50-minute change from day to day is only an average. And it’s related to the angle of the Moon’s orbit with respect to Earth’s equator — because unlike many satellites in the solar system, our Moon doesn’t orbit Earth’s equator. Around the vernal equinox, which kicks off spring in the Northern Hemisphere, that interval can stretch to a 70-minute change in moonrise times from night to night. And around the autumnal equinox, it shrinks to just 20 minutes or so. (Note that these times and dates are flipped for the Southern Hemisphere, which gets the most moonlight around the vernal equinox and the least around the autumnal equinox.)

What’s happening now is the Moon is rising further north each day, which translates to — for those north of the equator at this time of year — smaller changes in the time of moonrise from day to day. That’s because the Moon’s orbit is tilted the smallest amount to the horizon or, put another way, appears most parallel with the horizon at this time.

Your latitude above or below the equator affects the magnitude of the Harvest Moon effect. This week, the farther north you live, the bigger the effect, and the closer together subsequent moonrises appear, and for longer. For example, check out the moonrise times listed below in Chicago, Illinois (at 42° N), compared with those in Fairbanks, Alaska (65° N) over the next week. In Chicago, the Moon will rise a maximum of just 22 minutes later each day for about three days in a row. But in Fairbanks, where the Moon rises earlier each day, subsequent moonrises are just 6 minutes apart for most of the week.

The Full Moon is one of the easiest objects in the sky to observe. Because it rises around sunset, there’s no need to stay up late; alternatively, if you’re an early riser, it’s easy to catch just before sunrise. And, in fact, watching the Moon rise or set against any earthly backdrop gives you a chance to observe another effect, called the Moon illusion, which makes our satellite appear larger near the horizon than at zenith.

Researchers disagree on the exact reason this occurs; or perhaps it may differ from person to person, or depend on your observing conditions and location. Regardless of the reason, the illusion is most pronounced when the Moon is Full. And it is an illusion, the Moon isn’t changing apparent size over the course of a single night. However, the Moon does change apparent size as it goes from perigee to apogee — the closest and farthest points from Earth in its slightly elliptical orbit around our planet.

When the Moon is Full, its nearside (the only side we see from Earth) is on broad display. Most prominent are its large, circular maria, or seas. These weren’t ever filled with water but are instead ancient lava flows. They are also the youngest parts of the lunar surface and the regions NASA chose to send astronauts during its six manned Apollo landings. The Seas of Serenity, Tranquillity, Fertility, and Crises are the most prominent in the lunar east, which appears on our satellite’s right side when viewed from Earth’s Northern Hemisphere. In the lunar west, the Seas of Showers and Clouds, as well as the Ocean of Storms, loom largest. Tycho is perhaps the most prominent crater, spreading broad streaks, called rays, across the lunar south. Other noteworthy craters include, moving clockwise from Tycho, Byrgius (lunar southwest), Copernicus (lunar west), and Langrenus (lunar east).

Enjoying the Full Moon is an easy and fun activity for observers of all ages and experience levels. So, while the Harvest Moon is lighting the sky this week, make sure to enjoy the start of fall with a spectacular celestial show!

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.

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