China Blocks Didi From App Stores Days After Mega U.S. IPO

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Yahoo Finance 04 July, 2021 - 08:34am 23 views

Ride-Hailing App Didi Banned In China For Illegally Collecting User Data

NDTV 04 July, 2021 - 09:00am

Didi gathers vast amounts of real-time mobility data every day.

China's cyberspace administration said on Sunday that it had ordered smartphone app stores to stop selling the ride-hailing firm Didi Global Inc's app after finding that Didi had illegally collected users' personal data.

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) said on its social media feed that it had ordered Didi to make changes to comply with Chinese data protection rules. It did not specify the nature of Didi's violation.

Didi responded by saying it had stopped registering new users and would remove its app from app stores. It said it would make changes to comply with rules and protect users' rights.

Chinese regulators have tightened data collection rules for major tech firms in recent years.

CAC on Friday announced an investigation into Didi to protect "national security and the public interest", two days after the firm began trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

Didi, which offers services in China and more than 15 other markets, gathers vast amounts of real-time mobility data every day. It uses some of the data for autonomous driving technologies and traffic analysis.

Founded by Will Cheng in 2012, the company has already been subject to regulatory probes in China over safety and its operating licence.

Didi had set out relevant Chinese regulations in its IPO prospectus and said: "We follow strict procedures in collecting, transmitting, storing and using user data pursuant to our data security and privacy policies."

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China suspends Didi app for data violation

Illawarra Mercury 04 July, 2021 - 09:00am

The Cyberspace Administration of China said on its social media feed that it had ordered Didi to make changes to comply with Chinese data protection rules. It did not specify the nature of Didi's violation.

Didi responded by saying it had stopped registering new users and would remove its app from app stores. It said it would make changes to comply with rules and protect users' rights.

Chinese regulators have tightened data collection rules for major tech firms in recent years.

CAC on Friday announced an investigation into Didi to protect "national security and the public interest", two days after the firm began trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

Didi, which offers services in China and more than 15 other markets, gathers vast amounts of real-time mobility data every day. It uses some of the data for autonomous driving technologies and traffic analysis.

Founded by Will Cheng in 2012, the company has already been subject to regulatory probes in China over safety and its operating licence.

Didi had set out relevant Chinese regulations in its IPO prospectus and said: "We follow strict procedures in collecting, transmitting, storing and using user data pursuant to our data security and privacy policies."

China regulator orders Didi ride-hailing app removed from stores

The Verge 04 July, 2021 - 08:20am

The regulator says the company illegally collected users’ personal information

Didi was founded in China in 2012, and a recent regulatory filing shows it has 377 million active users in China alone. The company just went public on June 30th, the biggest IPO of a Chinese company on a US stock exchanges since Alibaba in 2014. On Friday, the CAC announced new user registrations for Didi’s service were being suspended pending a “cybersecurity review.”

In response to a request for comment, a Didi spokesperson pointed to a Sunday post on its Weibo page (translated from Chinese via Google Translate) that said its app would be removed in accordance with the order, and that users who have downloaded the Didi app could continued to use it normally.

Over the past several weeks, China’s regulators have been cracking down on tech companies for a range of violations, The Wall Street Journal reported, with a focus on anti-competitive practices, inconsistent pricing, and the ways apps handle users’ data.

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China Orders Ride-Hailing Firm Didi’s App Removed From App Stores

The Wall Street Journal 04 July, 2021 - 07:37am

The Cyberspace Administration of China also ordered Didi Chuxing, the company’s China business, to address the issues according to relevant Chinese standards and to ensure the safety of the personal information of users.

Beijing’s latest order comes just two days after regulators blocked the company from adding new users as regulators reviewed the company’s cybersecurity.

Didi said current users who had already downloaded the app wouldn’t be affected by the move.

“We sincerely thank the responsible departments for guiding Didi to look into the risks,” Didi said in a statement posted on Weibo, a Twitter -like platform. Didi also promised to “conscientiously rectify” the issues.

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China regulator orders Didi to be removed from app stores

Mint 04 July, 2021 - 07:35am

China’s cyberspace regulator ordered app stores to remove Didi Chuxing from their list of offerings, citing serious violations on the ride-hailing company’s collection and usage of personal information

China’s cyberspace regulator ordered app stores to remove Didi Chuxing from their list of offerings, citing serious violations on the ride-hailing company’s collection and usage of personal information.

The Cyberspace Administration of China announced the move on Sunday, just two days after it said it was starting a cybersecurity review of the company. It ordered Didi to rectify its problems following legal requirements and national standards, and effectively protect the personal information security of its users.

Didi Global Inc. had only started trading on Wednesday in New York after a $4.4 billion initial public offering, pulling off one of the biggest U.S. stock market debuts of the past decade. It lost as much as 11% of its market value at one point on Friday.

Didi didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on the regulator’s move outside of business hours. The company had said it would halt new user registrations during the probe.

The surprise probe by China’s internet regulator had piled on the scrutiny of Didi over issues ranging from antitrust to data security. The company has been grappling with a broad antitrust probe into China’s internet firms with uncertain outcomes for Didi and peers like major backer Tencent Holdings Ltd.

More broadly, Beijing has been curbing the growing influence of China’s largest internet corporations, widening an effort to tighten the ownership and handling of troves of information that internet giants from Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. to Tencent and Didi scoop up daily from hundreds of millions of users.

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Didi app suspended in China over data protection

Reuters 04 July, 2021 - 07:00am

BEIJING, July 4 (Reuters) - China's cyberspace administration said on Sunday that it had ordered smartphone app stores to stop offering the ride-hailing firm Didi Global Inc's (DIDI.N) app after finding that Didi had illegally collected users' personal data.

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) said on its social media feed that it had ordered Didi to make changes to comply with Chinese data protection rules. It did not specify the nature of Didi's violation.

Didi responded by saying it had stopped registering new users and would remove its app from app stores. It said it would make changes to comply with rules and protect users' rights.

Didi debuted on the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday following a $4.4 billion initial public offering (IPO).

Didi was valued at $67.5 billion in the IPO, well down from the $100 billion it had hoped for, which potential investors had resisted. read more

Redex Research director Kirk Boodry, who publishes on Smartkarma, said CAC's move appeared aggressive, but that Didi had anyway been banned from adding new users during a review of its cybersecurity.

"It indicates the process could take a while, but they have a large installed base so near-term impact (is) likely muted for now."

Didi's app was still working in China for people who had already downloaded it. It offers over 20 million rides in China every day, on average

CAC on Friday announced an investigation into Didi to protect "national security and the public interest", prompting a 5.3% fall in its share price to $15.53. read more

The stock was sold at $14 in the IPO - the top of the flagged range.

Chinese regulators have tightened data collection rules for major tech firms in recent years.

Didi, which offers services in China and more than 15 other markets, gathers vast amounts of real-time mobility data every day. It uses some of the data for autonomous driving technologies and traffic analysis.

Founded by Will Cheng in 2012, the company has already been subject to regulatory probes in China over safety and its operating licence. read more

Didi had set out relevant Chinese regulations in its IPO prospectus and said: "We follow strict procedures in collecting, transmitting, storing and using user data pursuant to our data security and privacy policies."

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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