Coca-Cola Is Changing the Flavor of Coke Zero Sugar

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ComicBook.com 15 July, 2021 - 08:04pm 6 views

Is Coke changing their formula?

Coca-Cola has announced that it will be altering the taste of Coca-Cola Zero Sugar (formerly Coke Zero), creating an “even more delicious and refreshing recipe”, but some drinks fans are unhappy about the news. The IndependentCoca-Cola is changing its recipe – soda fans are worried

Is Coke Zero changing?

Well, Coca-Cola announced Tuesday that it is changing the recipe for Coca-Cola Zero Sugar, which replaced Coke Zero a few years ago, and also giving the soda cans a makeover. The new Coke Zero Sugar recipe will reportedly taste more like regular Coke and will be in all red cans, instead of red and black cans. syracuse.comNew Coke redux? Coca-Cola is changing Zero Sugar taste, look

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Consumers' Research executive director Will Hild explains how the organization is calling out 'woke' companies in a new initiative.

The new efforts – which include an ad that will air in Atlanta, a new website called AlwaysWokaCola.com and mobile billboards attached to trucks that will drive around Coca-Cola's headquarters, its museum and the Georgia State Capitol over the next 28 days – are part of the nonprofit's ongoing, seven-figure ad campaign targetting "woke" companies.

"Today, we are launching AlwaysWokaCola.com and the accompanying ads as a satirical reminder to Coke to focus on their consumers, not woke politicians," Will Hild, executive director of Consumers' Research, told FOX Business in a statement Thursday.

The ads highlight Coca-Cola's impact on the United States' obesity epidemic; reports that Coca-Cola and other big-name U.S. brands lobbied against a bill aiming to bar companies from using labor in China's Xinjiang Province, where Muslim minority populations are subject to forced labor and other human rights violations (though Coca-Cola has denied it uses any forced labor); and other health concerns related to Coke beverages.

"The company has taken its eye off the well-being of the customer," Wild said. "Their products continue to contribute significantly to childhood obesity, they have sourced sugar from companies in China reportedly using forced labor, and they have such poor quality control that racist directives, like' 'be less white' are included in staff trainings."

Hild's statement references the soft drink company's attempts to promote an online training seminar available on LinkedIn that urged employees to "try to be less white" in order to combat racial discrimination.

Coca-Cola shared a letter with FOX Business at the time saying the slides attributed to the company's training program "are not part of the company’s learning curriculum," and its "Better Together global training is part of a learning plan to help build an inclusive workplace."

The May Consumers' Research ad focused on Coca-Cola's concern with new GOP voting legislation in Georgia.

"We respect everyone’s right to raise their concerns and express their views, but we also believe the best way to make progress now is for us all to come together to listen, respectfully share concerns and collaborate on a path forward," Coca-Cola told FOX Business in a statement at the time. "We remain open to productive conversations with groups who may have differing views."

The company also noted Consumers' Research's specific criticism on sugary drinks leading to obesity, saying the company has "taken steps to help people reduce the amount of sugar they consume" in the U.S. and around the world. 

Hild said he hopes the new ad campaign "will serve to amplify the voice of consumers fed up with how the company is failing them and as a warning to Coke and other companies."

"Any corporation who decides to distract from their misdeeds by taking radical positions on political and social issues that are unrelated to their business to garner positive praise from woke politicians and press is on notice, it’s not going to work," he said.

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Coca-Cola to introduce new Coke Zero — and consumers are nervous

New York Post 16 July, 2021 - 05:00am

By Lisa Fickenscher

July 15, 2021 | 9:59am | Updated July 15, 2021 | 10:01am

Coca-Cola is about to change the formula for Coke Zero — and some soda drinkers are having flashbacks.

Later this month, new versions of Coke Zero Sugar will be arriving on store shelves as Coke looks to fend off competition from Pepsi Zero Sugar.

The new recipe, as well as packaging, is meant to taste and look more like classic Coke. But consumers are already suspicious — and some are reminding the company of what happened in 1985.

“You’d better have a backup plan if this as screwed up as New Coke was. Wait-do you even remember New Coke?  Stop messing with a good thing dammit!,” tweeted @Thrtboy69.

Thirty-six years ago, Coca-Cola changed the flavor of regular Coke and consumers hated it, forcing the company to retreat and bring back the old version as “Coca-Cola Classic” — just three months later.

In its statement this week, the company said the new change “optimizes existing Coca-Cola Zero Sugar flavors and existing ingredients,” and promised that it wouldn’t change the basic ingredients.

“All listed ingredients and nutritional information remain the same,” the company said.

The version is already being sold in Europe and Latin America, and so far so good, the company added. “Reaction from consumers in taste tests has been positive,” Coca-Cola executive Rafael Prandini said in a statement.

Coca-Cola Zero Sugar gets new taste, design for the second time in four years, fans fume once again

Daily Mail 16 July, 2021 - 05:00am

By Matt Mcnulty For Dailymail.Com

Coca-Cola is changing the recipe and can design of it's Coca-Cola Zero Sugar beverage line for the second time in four years, the soft drink giant revealed on Tuesday - sparking outrage from fans.

The calorie-free drink will be reformulated to look and taste closer to regular full-sugar Coca-Cola, the company said.

Although they were not specific on what had changed, Coke said the new recipe should be 'more refreshing and delicious.'

And the can will also get a redesign, ditching the black-and-red background for a fully red can with black lettering - again to bring the brand closer in line with classic Coke.

The new formula is set to roll out in the US this month and Canada in September, and has already appeared in some international markets, CNN reports. 

Coke Zero first launched in 2005 with a fully black can, but the company controversially tweaked the recipe in 2017 and relaunched it as Coca-Cola Zero Sugar. 

And the reaction to Coke's latest change has provoked similar outrage from fans who have already tasted it.

'Awful,' one person described the changes on Twitter. 

Coca-Cola is changing the recipe and can design of it's Coke Zero Sugar beverage line for the second time in four years, with fans lashing out once again 

The idea behind the most recent flavor and design change is to get Coke Zero Sugar to look and taste as close to regular Coca-Cola as possible, according to company officials

'The new taste is so bad,' another tweeted of the drink update,  

'Shoutout to coca cola for changing their coca cola zero sugar recipe bc you made me get ride of my addiction bc the taste is so bad.' a third opined, with many more following suit. 

'What have you done to my favorite drink coke zero sugar?' one despondent fan tweeted. 

'The new recipe is shocking. I won't be buying another can until you fix your mistake and bring back the old flavour.' 

'I'm with you. I also will not be buying the new taste Coke Zero, despite being a loyal Coca Cola fan for 30 years,' another replied.

But despite the social media blowback, company officials have called recent taste tests of the drink 'very encouraging,' according to the news outlet. 

'We pre-tested both the new recipe and the new look, with current Coca-Cola Zero Sugar consumers and non-consumers,' said Rafael Prandini, category lead of Coca-Cola Trademark in North America. 

While the drink has become a popular alternative to regular Coca-Cola, it still makes up a fraction of the brand's overall business.

AdWeek reports that Coke Zero Sugar amounts to 7.9 percent of the overall cola market.

But that is still far more than rivals Pepsi Zero Sugar, which corners just 0.4 percent of the cola market.

And sales of Coke Zero Sugar appeared to be growing before the change, with the line increasing four percent by volume last year and eight percent by volume in first quarter of 2021. 

Coca Cola Zero Sugar first launched as Coke Zero, with a black can design in 2005, but was rebranded with a new flavor in 2017 

'Despite its enormous success, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar still represents a relatively small percentage,' of the Coke brand, CEO James Quincey said of the company's first quarter results in April.

'The improved recipe brings its taste even closer to that [of] the iconic Coca-Cola,' he added, saying that 'this was influenced by consumer insight and our focus on constant improvement.' 

The outrage over the new recipe harkens back to changes Coca-Cola made to the Zero Sugar brand back in 2017, where changes to the drink's taste were met with widespread criticism from fans of the beverage. 

'#CokeZeroSugar is gross' one fan of the beverage tweeted back in 2017.

'Bring back Coke Zero. The new recipe is weaker in carbonation and sweeter' they said of the 2017 recipe changes. 

AdWeek reports that Coke Zero Sugar amounts to 7.9 percent of the cola market, compared to Pepsi Zero Sugar at just 0.4 percent.

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Coca-Cola headquarters should move from Atlanta to Illinois

Crain's Chicago Business 16 July, 2021 - 05:00am

Texans working from home are apparently staying put for now, but given retrograde legislation enacted in Georgia and that state's abysmal COVID-19 vaccination rate—45th out of the 50 states and D.C.; Illinois is 25th—how hard will the beverage giant find it to attract new talent?

For consumer marketing talent, our area has a special appeal, with metropolitan amenities and the presence of Northwestern's Kellogg School of Management. Skeptics may say Coca-Cola is entrenched in Atlanta and wouldn't budge, but a quarter century ago, people thought the same of Boeing in Seattle and Caterpillar in Peoria. Both have since relocated head offices to the Chicago area.

J.I. Case, a maker of farm and construction equipment, was founded in Racine, Wis., and maintained headquarters there for a century and a half. After acquisitions and reorganization, it became CNH Global, and de facto headquarters quietly moved to suburban Chicago, an easier sell for executive talent. Following the addition of other assets in 2013, the company became known as CNH Industrial. In 2019, the company was "registered in the Netherlands" and "headquartered in London for tax purposes," while its CEO and hundreds of managers and staff worked in Burr Ridge. The current CEO, Scott Wine, lists the Chicago area as home on his LinkedIn profile.

After 94 years in Omaha, ConAgra Foods' headquarters moved to Chicago in 2016, its CEO noting the action "places us in the heart of one of the world's business capitals and consumer packaged goods centers, enhancing our ability to attract and retain top talent."

Years earlier, the company relocated some marketing teams from Omaha to Naperville and in 2010 added snack foods brand management to the suburb. "Chicago offers an outstanding workforce," snacks business unit president David Palfenier said at the time, adding that ConAgra does a lot of recruiting at the Kellogg School. Palfenier also noted our area's "incredibly diverse workforce," stating "that's got to be at the forefront of any company's agenda."

ConAgra products include Ro-Tel tomatoes, Vlasic pickles, Birds Eye frozen foods and Hebrew National hot dogs. Coca-Cola markets Dasani, Smartwater, Topo Chico, Schweppes sparkling beverages, Fairlife milk, Gold Peak teas and coffees, Minute Maid juices and scores of additional lines.

ConAgra's gradual migration to Illinois offers a template for others.

Atlanta will always be the historical center of Coca-Cola, its heritage celebrated at the city's World of Coca-Cola attraction.

Successful companies competing for talent, however, cannot afford to look backward.

Have something to get off your chest? You can send us an email. Or tell us on our Facebook page or on Twitter, @CrainsChicago.

Staying current is easy with Crain's news delivered straight to your inbox, free of charge.

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Coke Zero Is Changing Its Flavor & We Are Upset

Refinery29 16 July, 2021 - 05:00am

‘Woke-A-Cola’ Giving Americans Diabetes And Defending China, One Sip At A Time

The Free Press 15 July, 2021 - 02:56pm

Consumers’ Research, a consumer advocacy group, launched a series of advertisements Thursday calling out Coca-Cola’s “woke hypocrisy” for its reported defense of China and alleged health concerns associated with its sugary drinks.

Part of the campaign is a video advertisement satirizing a Coca-Cola commercial, which is set to music with lyrics like “Just drink Coke, the road to obesity” and “China is our labor supplier that drives our stock price even higher.” The group also created a website “alwayswokacola.com” to continue to expose the company.

In addition to promoting the video advertisement that will air in Atlanta and nationwide, Consumers’ Research says it plans to drive mobile billboards around Coca-Cola’s headquarters, the Coca-Cola museum, and the Georgia State Capitol for 28 days.

“Today, we are launching AlwaysWokaCola.com and the accompanying ads as a satirical reminder to Coke to focus on their consumers, not woke politicians. The company has taken its eye off the well-being of the customer,” Consumers’ Research Executive Director Will Hild said in a statement Thursday.

“Their products continue to contribute significantly to childhood obesity, they have sourced sugar from companies in China reportedly using forced labor, and they have such poor quality control that racist directives, like ‘be less white’ are included in staff trainings,” Hild added.

The campaign aims to “to amplify the voice of consumers fed up with how the company is failing them and as a warning to Coke and other companies,” according to the statement.

“Any corporation who decides to distract from their misdeeds by taking radical positions on political and social issues that are unrelated to their business to garner positive praise from woke politicians and press is on notice, it’s not going to work,” Hild said.

The new advertisements are part of a seven-figure campaign Consumers’ Research is conducting to also expose American Airlines, Nike, Ticketmaster and the MLB, according to a press release. The Consumers First Initiative aims to give consumers transparency about companies so they can decide for themselves what products to buy.

Coca-Cola was sued along with the American Beverage Association in 2017 for allegedly knowingly misleading consumers about the health effects of its drinks. Coca-Cola said at the time that the accusations were “legally and factually meritless,” according to The Atlanta-Journal Constitution.

The plaintiffs in the case said they’ve since withdrawn the complaint, recognizing that both groups “have moved away from claiming that their products have no connection to chronic disease.”

The company also reportedly pushed back on legislation that sought to crack down on forced labor in China. Coca-Cola has been tied to sugar suppliers in Xinjiang, where China is reportedly committing a genocide against the Uyghur ethnic minority group.

Coca-Cola defended, according to The New York Times, that it “strictly prohibits any type of forced labor in our supply chain” and has independent auditors monitoring its suppliers.

Meanwhile, Coca-Cola continues to make statements about political issues in the U.S. Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey earlier this year labeled a Georgia voting bill that has since been passed as “unacceptable.”

“It is a step backwards and it does not promote principles we have stood for in Georgia around broad access to voting, around voter convenience, about ensuring election integrity – this is frankly just a step backwards,” he said. “We have said for many decades we promote within Georgia better society and better environment and this is a step backwards and our position remains the same. This legislation is wrong.”

The company also allegedly promoted a course that encouraged people to “be less white.” The lesson was later deleted from LinkedIn.

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