Coronavirus in Ohio Monday update: 660 new cases reported

Health

NBC4 WCMH-TV 19 July, 2021 - 12:15pm 35 views

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — The Ohio Department of Health has released the latest number of COVID-19 cases in the state. 

As of Monday, July 19, 2021, a total of 1,117,769 (+660) cases have been reported since the start of the pandemic, leading to 61,198 (+35) hospitalizations and 8,397 (+4) ICU admissions. A total of 5,666,991 people — or 48.48% of the state’s population — has at least started the vaccination process, an increase of 3,995 from the previous day.

The 660 new cases is double the average for the past 21 days. A note on the Department of Health’s online dashboard read, “Today’s number for the last 24 Hour reported cases change may be elevated due to a technical issue that prevented a small number of cases from being counted over the past several weeks. The technical issue has been resolved.”

ODH reported an additional 26 deaths Friday, bringing the total to 20,437. The state is updating the total number of deaths only after death certificates have been processed, usually twice a week.

On Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine said the state could be days away from announcing a new incentive program to encourage Ohioans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

On Wednesday, DeWine signed a bill into law that includes a provision banning schools and universities from requiring vaccines approved for use under an emergency use authorization, such as the COVID-19 vaccines. A spokesman with DeWine’s office said the governor is confident the Food and Drug Administration will eventually grant full approval to the COVID-19 vaccines, “thus rendering this issue moot.”

Data compiled from state health sources show COVID-19 cases in Ohio are slowly increasing, causing health experts to raise flags about possible new outbreaks.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

COLUMBUS (WCMH) – COVID-19 numbers are on the rise in Ohio, and that increase has doctors making an even stronger push to get people vaccinated.

Columbus Public Health's cash-for-vaccines incentive program is trying to help get more people vaccinated, and leaders said it's getting results.

Columbus Police said the shooting happened at approximately 3:57 p.m. on the 500 block of South Napoleon Avenue.

“That’s the biggest change this year is just that emphasis on fatigue and corrosion and making sure the rides are as safe as they possibly can be,” said David Miran, the Chief of the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Amusement Ride Safety.

Read full article at NBC4 WCMH-TV

Indiana coronavirus updates: July 17, 2021

WTHR 19 July, 2021 - 04:00pm

Ohio reports highest single-day increase in new coronavirus cases in nearly two months

cleveland.com 19 July, 2021 - 02:26pm

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The Ohio Department of Health reported 660 new coronavirus cases on Monday, the highest single-day increase in new infections in nearly two months.

The increase is Ohio’s largest in a 24-hour period since May 28, when the state reported an identical rise of 660 new infections, according to ODH data.

The ODH issued a clarification later Monday, saying the daily increase might be elevated due to a technical issue that prevented “a small number of cases” from being counted over the past two weeks. Officials did not specify how much the technical issue altered Monday’s total.

The state also reported 35 new hospitalizations and four new ICU admissions Monday. There were no new deaths reported, as death totals are updated just twice weekly on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The 660 new cases reported Monday is nearly double Ohio’s three-week average of 330 new infections per day, according to ODH data.

Ohio’s increase in new coronavirus infections is in line with a trend seen across the U.S. All 50 states are now seeing a rise in new cases, fueled by slowing vaccination rates and the spread of the more-transmissible Delta variant, health officials have said.

Ohio has seen new infections increase sharply over the past week. On July 12, the state had a seven-day average of 285 new cases per day. By Monday the seven-day average had risen by 39% to 468 new cases per day, according to ODH data.

Health officials across the U.S. have said the Delta variant is driving a surge in new infections. The variant, also known as B.1.617.2, was classified by the World Health Organization as a “variant of concern” after it caused a surge of coronavirus infections in India. Ohio health officials have warned the variant poses a significant risk to anyone who is not vaccinated.

The increase in new infections also comes as vaccinations have slowed in Ohio and other parts of the U.S. Less than 48.5% of Ohio’s population have started their vaccinations, and less than 45.5% have been fully vaccinated.

However, Ohio’s vaccination efforts have helped keep new infections lower than they were over the winter and into the spring of 2021. The state’s seven-day average of new infections peaked at more than 12,000 per day in mid-December, as was still more than 2,000 per day in mid-April, according to ODH data.

Health officials have repeatedly stressed that vaccinating more Americans is critical to reducing the risk of COVID-19. Approximately 97% of all COVID-19 hospitalizations nationwide are individuals who are unvaccinated, and nearly all deaths are among those who haven’t received a shot, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week.

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Weekly Ohio COVID-19 cases elevated as Delta variant increases infections across country

NBC4 WCMH-TV 19 July, 2021 - 02:24pm

by: Ben Orner

COLUMBUS (WCMH) – By two metrics, Ohio’s COVID-19 cases are at their highest point of the summer so far.

The Ohio Department of Health on Monday reported 660 new coronavirus cases, the highest one-day total since May 28, which also saw 660. And last week, ODH reported 2,842 cases, the most in a Monday-Sunday period since 4,634 cases May 24-30.

These data points are the latest in a July bump in cases that NBC4 reported on Friday. After enjoying a steady decline since April, cases have increased over the past two weeks.

With 660 new cases, Monday became the sixth day this month – and the fifth day in the last six – to see more than 400 cases. June saw four days over 400 cases, but all were early in the month.

Daily case counts are not backdated to the day of infection, but trends among these backdated “onset cases” tend to follow the raw releases. The last day Ohio saw more than 400 onset cases was June 2. But it was as recently as early- to mid-May when Ohio was recording multiple days with more than 1,000 onset cases.

Ohio’s rate of onset cases per 100,000 people over two weeks is 34.19 as of Friday, which is the highest it’s been since June 15, according to NBC4’s tracking. The rate has been increasing for the past two weeks after bottoming out at 23.21 per 100,000 on July 3.

Cases per county in July have mostly lined up with populations, with major counties like Franklin, Cuyahoga, Montgomery and Hamilton leading the state. But a notable outlier is 11th-ranked Lawrence County.

Despite being home to just under 60,000 people, the rural county at the south-central tip of Ohio has seen 100 coronavirus cases in July, 2.09% of the state’s total.

Health experts, though, are not yet ready to call this recent small bump in cases a lasting trend. ODH noted in its data release Monday that the 660 new cases “may be elevated due to a technical issue that prevented a small number of cases from being counted over the past several weeks.” That issue, ODH says, has been resolved.

Still, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that COVID-19 cases are rising in all 50 states for the first time since January, driven by the more contagious Delta variant of the virus, which has also gained a foothold in Ohio.

Delta made up 15% of cases sequenced by ODH from June 6-19, the latest results available, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff told reporters last week. In the two weeks before that sequencing, Delta was only 1.9% of Ohio’s cases.

“It appears that communities with low vaccination rates,” Vanderhoff said, “are at particular risk of what have been called ‘hyper local outbreaks,’ concentrating the devastating impact of this disease in those communities.”

Butler County, in suburban Cincinnati, was listed as a COVID-19 hotspot this month by the CDC but is considered to be recovering.

5,666,991 people have at least started vaccination in Ohio as of Monday, according to ODH. More than 48% of the state. That ranks in the bottom third of U.S. states. More than 45% of Ohioans have completed vaccination.

“The reality is we now have two Ohios,” Vanderhoff said, “an Ohio that is vaccinated and protected on the one hand, and an Ohio that is unvaccinated and vulnerable to Delta on the other.”

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

CINCINNATI, Ohio (AP) — Police say the Ohio newborn delivered after the shooting death of her pregnant mother last week has died.

Cincinnati police said 31-year-old Michelle McDonald died at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center following the shooting shortly after 6:30 p.m. Friday.

The recall includes two lots of Chantix 0.5 mg tablets, two lots of Chantix 1 mg tablets, and eight lots of a Chantix kit of 0.5mg/1 mg tablets that may have too much nitrosamine, N-nitroso-varenicline, based on the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) level established by Pfizer.

Columbus Public Health's cash-for-vaccines incentive program is trying to help get more people vaccinated, and leaders said it's getting results.

Ohio Department of Health urges COVID-19 precautions for unvaccinated at camps

Mahoning Matters 19 July, 2021 - 01:45pm

COLUMBUS — The Ohio Department of Health is urging caution at residential camps following reports of COVID-19 outbreaks linked to two camps in the western part of the state.

ODH has released updated residential camp guidance to advise campers and camp operators of best prevention practices.

The guidance recommends implementing layered prevention tactics at camps attended by any campers who are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

This involves use of multiple strategies that have been shown to be effective at controlling spread of the disease, including masking, social distancing, hand washing and frequent cleaning and sanitation.

“If not everyone at a residential camp is fully vaccinated, the layering of strategies is critical to protecting campers, staff and volunteers,” Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, chief medical officer at ODH, said in a news release. “This is especially important as a new, more contagious strain of COVID-19 settles in our state.

"Taking these precautions can help reduce the likelihood of spread and allow everyone to safely participate in camp activities,” Vanderhoff said.

The new guidance reiterates universal recommendations for vaccination, masking, distancing and sanitation. It also offers guidance specific to the camp experience, including cohorting and recommendations on when to wear and when not to wear face masks.

With the recent outbreaks, Vanderhoff continues to encourage all eligible Ohioans who can safely do so to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccine is currently available for use in anyone age 12 or older.

“Vaccination is our most effective tool for preventing COVID-19 and putting the pandemic behind us,” Vanderhoff said. “These vaccines save lives and will help ensure Ohioans are able to enjoy many more summers to come.”  

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Ohio health department issues new guidance after COVID-19 outbreaks linked to area camps

WLWT Cincinnati 19 July, 2021 - 05:56am

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As two camps in the Greater Cincinnati area are dealing with COVID-19 outbreaks, the Ohio Department of Health is updating its guidance.

The department says they're now recommending layered prevention tactics at camps that have campers who are not vaccinated.

That means wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands and increased cleaning.

The new guidance also includes advice specific to the camp experience-- including hanging out in groups and recommendations on when to and not to wear face masks.

The new guidance says those who not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 should be wearing a mask when:

"If not everyone at a residential camp is fully vaccinated, the layering of strategies is critical to protecting campers, staff, and volunteers," said Bruce Vanderhoff, MD, chief medical officer at ODH. "This is especially important as a new, more contagious strain of COVID-19 settles in our state. Taking these precautions can help reduce the likelihood of spread and allow everyone to safely participate in camp activities."

With the recent outbreaks, Vanderhoff is continuing to encourage all eligible Ohioans who can safely do so, to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

"Vaccination is our most effective tool for preventing COVID-19 and putting the pandemic behind us," Dr. Vanderhoff said. "These vaccines save lives and will help ensure Ohioans are able to enjoy many more summers to come."

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With delta variant looming, could poorly vaccinated Ohio face return of lockdowns, masks?

The Columbus Dispatch 19 July, 2021 - 05:27am

It's possible Ohio may never reach the mark, though it's too soon to know for sure, said Dr. Bill Miller, senior associate dean of research and professor of epidemiology at Ohio State University's College of Public Health.

On its current trajectory, 70% of adult Ohioans won't be vaccinated until May 2022 and neither will adults in Alabama or South Carolina, according to a Washington Post analysis published in Becker's Hospital Review. Louisiana may not reach 70% until June 2022, Montana and Idaho may not get there until July 2022, and North Dakota could be the last to reach the threshold, hitting it in September, according to Becker's.

If the predictions come to fruition, Miller said they threaten to "prolong the pandemic."

As of Friday, just over 48% of total Ohioans have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Neighboring Pennsylvania is at 64%, Massachusetts 71% and Vermont 75%, data show.

At the vaccine rollout's height, 107,898 shots were given March 31. Just 2,986 doses were administered Tuesday, the most-recent day for which data are available, according to the Ohio Department of Health.

"We are seeing outbreaks of cases in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage because unvaccinated people are at risk.  And communities that are fully vaccinated are generally faring well."

Across Ohio, the share of vaccinated residents varies widely, from 62% in Delaware County to 15% in Holmes County. That range of immunity could spark outbreaks across the state and at worst could necessitate more lockdowns, masking and distancing said Dr. Joe Gastaldo, medical director of infectious diseases at OhioHealth.

"If and when those things happen, it's going to be confusing for the public and you're going to have people revolt," Gastaldo said.

Gov. Mike DeWine repeated Friday that he does not plan to reissue a mask order.

Further complicating things is the delta variant, which is thought to be far more-contagious than earlier strains of the virus.

"The reality is we now have two Ohios," Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, medical director for the state health department said in a Wednesday call with reporters. "An Ohio that is vaccinated and protected on the one hand and an Ohio that is unvaccinated and vulnerable to delta on the other."

Ohio, Gastaldo said, may be just a few weeks behind other states seeing a resurgence in COVID-19 outbreaks due to delta. Otherwise, the next big wave of infections is likely to come this fall and winter as people flock back indoors without masks, Gastaldo said.

"It's really a sad event that somebody has to die because of COVID," he said. "For all intents and purposes, COVID deaths are preventable deaths."

Although the pace of vaccinations is slow now in Ohio, officials hope that changes once the shots get full approval from the Food and Drug Administration as opposed to the emergency authorization they've been granted so far. That approval could come before the end of summer.

Authorization for younger kids could come near the end of the year or early next year, an FDA official told NBC News on Thursday. That could provide a late boost to vaccinations, said Dr. Andrew Thomas, chief clinical officer at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center.

Coronavirus in Ohio Sunday update: 301 new cases, 7 hospitalizations

NBC4 WCMH-TV 18 July, 2021 - 12:15pm

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — The Ohio Department of Health has released the latest number of COVID-19 cases in the state. 

As of Sunday, July 18, 2021, a total of 1,117,109 (+301) cases have been reported since the start of the pandemic, leading to 61,163 (+7) hospitalizations and 8,393 (+0) ICU admissions. A total of 5,663,015 people — or 48.45% of the state’s population — has at least started the vaccination process, an increase of 4,291 from the previous day.

ODH reported an additional 26 deaths Friday, bringing the total to 20,437. The state is updating the total number of deaths only after death certificates have been processed, usually twice a week.

On Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine said the state could be days away from announcing a new incentive program to encourage Ohioans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

On Wednesday, DeWine signed a bill into law that includes a provision banning schools and universities from requiring vaccines approved for use under an emergency use authorization, such as the COVID-19 vaccines. A spokesman with DeWine’s office said the governor is confident the Food and Drug Administration will eventually grant full approval to the COVID-19 vaccines, “thus rendering this issue moot.”

Data compiled from state health sources show COVID-19 cases in Ohio are slowly increasing, causing health experts to raise flags about possible new outbreaks.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

CINCINNATI, Ohio (AP) — Police say the Ohio newborn delivered after the shooting death of her pregnant mother last week has died.

Cincinnati police said 31-year-old Michelle McDonald died at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center following the shooting shortly after 6:30 p.m. Friday.

The recall includes two lots of Chantix 0.5 mg tablets, two lots of Chantix 1 mg tablets, and eight lots of a Chantix kit of 0.5mg/1 mg tablets that may have too much nitrosamine, N-nitroso-varenicline, based on the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) level established by Pfizer.

Columbus Public Health's cash-for-vaccines incentive program is trying to help get more people vaccinated, and leaders said it's getting results.

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