COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Missouri reports 1,627 new confirmed cases on Tueseday

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KMBC Kansas City 13 July, 2021 - 05:33pm 69 views

Here are the latest COVID-19 updates in the Kansas City metro area

Here are the latest COVID-19 updates in the Kansas City metro area

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Here are the latest COVID-19 updates in the Kansas City metro area

The Birthplace of Route 66 Festival, which was scheduled for Aug. 13-14 and typically includes live music and a classic car parade, has been called off for the second year in a row due to COVID-19. In 2019, the last year the festival was held, it drew 65,000 attendees over two days, and it was expected to host 75,000 this year, according to the city. READ MORE

The state reported there have been 6,331 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 904 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,440 (+52) deaths since the start of the outbreak. The state reported 47 of the new death reports came from further analysis of death certificates.

There are 19% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.2%, according to the MDHSS.

While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,056,125 vaccine doses, 2,787,444 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,441,218 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.4% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.8% have completed vaccination.

As of Saturday, an estimated 43.8% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.9%, Clay County is at 35.3%, Cass County is at 35.7% and Platte County is at 30.6%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,682 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,350 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,728 cases in Clay County, 8,108 in Cass County and 3,436 in Platte County.

NYT reports news cases over the last 14 days are up 68% in Missouri. They’re 173% in Kansas. #MOCOVID #KSCOVID @kmbc pic.twitter.com/cm1xhLz09h

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement it has received reports of 100 people who got the shot developing Guillain-Barré syndrome, an immune system disorder that can cause muscle weakness and occasionally paralysis. READ MORE

KDHE reported 12 new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,188. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 22 to 11,239 since the start of the outbreak.

The state also said it is tracking 94 cases of the delta variant in Johnson County, 51 in Wyandotte County, 10 in Leavenworth County, six in Douglas County and two in Miami County.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 7.1% for July 2021 to date – which is a spike of 4% from the last update. However, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,307,288 people, 2,376,825 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 44.9% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.5% have completed vaccination.

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,597 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,381. Wyandotte County is third with 21,312 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,442 cases, Douglas County reports 9,040 and Miami County has 2,867.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 45 outbreak clusters, up from 26 earlier this month. A total of 298 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 21 hospitalizations and seven deaths.

Kansas is getting $23.5 million from federal Dept of Health & Human Service (HSS) for rural COVID efforts. Money to 91 rural Ks hospitals. COVID testing & vaccination efforts. #KsCOVID @HSS @kmbc pic.twitter.com/BCzToLJeYO

That's the most virus wards Mercy Hospital in Springfield has had. Chief Administrative Officer Erik Frederick tweeted that the hospital needed at most five COVID-19 wards last year.

The hospital was treating 133 virus patients as of Sunday.

“Many local rural communities don’t have high vaccination rates,” Frederick wrote. “They also don’t have a hospital. Get sick, come to Springfield. I think that’s getting left out of the narrative.”

Doctors and nurses are treating 39 patients for COVID-19, and 26 are considered active inpatients, with nine people in the ICU and 10 on ventilators.

Doctors say seven of the 39 patients are vaccinated, and two of them are in the ICU. Doctors say they’re working to get more information on their health histories and backgrounds.

"Remember, out of 39 people, 32 have not been vaccinated,” Dr. Steve Stites said. “But we just want to make sure that we've got all the right advice that we can for folks who are being vaccinated and especially if you have other illnesses that accompany that "

Doctors recommend people with underlying health conditions should keep taking safety precautions, even if they’ve been vaccinated.

The state reported there have been 5,834 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 833 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,388 (+1) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 17% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state dropped slightly to 12.3%, according to the MDHSS.

While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,048,186 vaccine doses, 2,782,295 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,437,868 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.3% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.7% have completed vaccination.

As of Saturday, an estimated 43.7% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.8%, Clay County is at 35.2%, Cass County is at 35.6% and Platte County is at 30.5%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,594 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,245 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,712 cases in Clay County, 8,083 in Cass County and 3,424 in Platte County.

The state reported there have been 6,121 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 874 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,387 (+0) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 19% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state rose again to 12.5%, according to the MDHSS – the highest it’s been since January 13. While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state’s vaccination dashboard was not updated Sunday. On Saturday, the state said it has administered 5,023,913 vaccine doses, 2,766,600 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,428,241 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.1% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.6% have completed vaccination.

As od Saturday, an estimated 43.5% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.6%, Clay County is at 35%, Cass County is at 35.4% and Platte County is at 30.4%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,579 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,235 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,711 cases in Clay County, 8,084 in Cass County and 3,423 in Platte County.

The state reported there have been 5,794 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 828 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,387 (+4) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 19% of remaining ICU beds available and 71% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state fell slightly to 12.1%, according to the MDHSS. While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,023,913 vaccine doses, 2,766,600 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,428,241 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.1% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.6% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.5% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.6%, Clay County is at 35%, Cass County is at 35.4% and Platte County is at 30.4%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,545 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,197 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,704 cases in Clay County, 8,079 in Cass County and 3,417 in Platte County.

The city said in a news release that the population most at risk are those who have not been vaccinated, particularly children under the age of 12. READ MORE.

KDHE reported nine new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,176. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 31 to 11,217 since the start of the outbreak.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 3.1% for July 2021 to date. While showing small increases since the start of the month, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,303,088 people, 2,369,166 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 44.7% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.4% have completed vaccination.

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,467 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,294. Wyandotte County is third with 21,240 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,420 cases, Douglas County reports 9,034 and Miami County has 2,853.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 45 outbreak clusters, up from 26 earlier this month. A total of 298 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 21 hospitalizations and seven deaths.

The changes come amid a national vaccination campaign in which children as young as 12 are eligible to get shots, as well as a general decline in COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths. READ MORE

Missouri State Epidemiologist George Turabbelidze says the Delta COVID outbreak will last a few more weeks in Missouri. And there is evidence it is moving into urban & suburban areas with higher vaccination rates. #DeltaPlusVariant #Missourioutbreak @kmbc pic.twitter.com/5sRJEZpx12

The state reported there have been 5,468 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 781 cases a day.

Missouri continues leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,383 (+6) deaths since the start of the outbreak. There are 21% of remaining ICU beds available and 72% of ventilators available, the state said.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state fell slightly to 11.9%, according to the MDHSS. While that number has climbed more than seven percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,023,913 vaccine doses, 2,766,600 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,428,241 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45.1% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.6% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.5% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.6%, Clay County is at 35%, Cass County is at 35.4% and Platte County is at 30.4%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,490 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,148 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,684 cases in Clay County, 8,059 in Cass County and 3,415 in Platte County.

The analysis by researchers at Georgetown University identified 30 clusters of counties with low vaccination rates and significant population sizes. The five most significant of those clusters are sprawled across large swaths of the southeastern United States and a smaller portion in the Midwest. READ MORE

Missouri asked for help last week from nearly formed federal “surge response” teams as it combats an influx of cases that public health officials are blaming on fast-spreading delta variant and deep-seated concerns about the vaccine.

After one official noted the effort that could include door-to-door promotion of the vaccine, Parson tweeted: “I have directed our health department to let the federal government know that sending government employees or agents door-to-door to compel vaccination would NOT be an effective OR a welcome strategy in Missouri!" READ MORE

The state reported there have been 5,016 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 717 cases a day.

Missouri now leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

That same variant has been found in Kansas City-area wastewater treatment facilities, meaning it's beginning to take hold in the metro.

The state said there have now been 9,377 (+2) deaths since the start of the outbreak.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state climbed to 12.1%, according to the MDHSS – a growth of a full percentage point in 24 hours. That number is the highest it has been since Jan. 13, 2021. While that number has climbed more than eight percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,012,719 vaccine doses, 2,759,803 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,423,211 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 45% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.5% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.4% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.5%, Clay County is at 35%, Cass County is at 35.3% and Platte County is at 30.3%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Dr. Dana Hawkinson said the facility is still treating 30 total coronavirus patients, 16 of which are considered to have active infections. One of those patients has been moved onto a ventilator. The other 14 patients are considered to be in the recovery phase.

KDHE reported seven new deaths, making the total since the start of the outbreak 5,166. The state reported hospitalizations increased by 51 to 11,186 since the start of the outbreak.

State health officials are now also tracking MIS-C cases in the state, or Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, associated with COVID-19. So far, the state notes 17 cases.

The overall monthly positivity is at 3.1% for July 2021 to date. While showing small increases since the start of the month, that number is down from a high of 16.5% in November.

The state also said it has vaccinated 1,299,941 people, 2,361,929 total doses of the vaccine have been administered and 44.6% of the population has been vaccinated with one dose and 39.2% have completed vaccination.

Johnson County is the county with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases since the start of the outbreak with 60,246 cases. Sedgwick County is second with 58,165. Wyandotte County is third with 21,184 cases. Leavenworth County has 7,375 cases, Douglas County reports 9,015 and Miami County has 2,836.

Health officials said they’re now monitoring 45 outbreak clusters, up from 26 earlier this month. A total of 298 cases have been attributed to these clusters with 21 hospitalizations and seven deaths.

The state reported there have been 5,015 positive cases over the last seven days and an average of 716 cases a day.

Missouri now leads the nation in the most new COVID-19 cases per capita in the last two weeks.

The delta variant of the virus is believed responsible for much of the spread in Missouri, especially in the southwestern and northern parts of the state. Officials also cite low vaccination rates, especially in rural areas.

The state said there have now been 9,375 (+35) deaths since the start of the outbreak. A reason for the large increase Wednesday was not provided.

The overall seven-day positivity rate for the state climbed to 11%, according to the MDHSS. That number is the highest it has been since Jan. 15, 2021. While that number has climbed more than six percentage points since June, the number is still down from a high of 23.1% in November.

The state said it has administered 5,002,264 vaccine doses, 2,753,516 people have initiated vaccination (or received one dose) and 2,418,483 people have received a second dose. Overall, the state said 44.9% of the population has received at least one dose and 39.4% have completed vaccination.

An estimated 43.3% of Kansas City residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, while Jackson County is at 41.4%, Clay County is at 34.9%, Cass County is at 35.2% and Platte County is at 30.3%.

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 40,325 confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 33,023 cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 8,650 cases in Clay County, 8,002 in Cass County and 3,406 in Platte County.

Dr. Dana Hawkinson said of those 30 patients, 18 have active infections, including six people in the ICU. The other 12 patients are considered to be in the recovery phase.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Read full article at KMBC Kansas City

Springfield, Missouri hospital opens 6th COVID ward

KSDK News 13 July, 2021 - 04:07pm

COVID Cases In Parts Of Missouri And Arkansas Surge To Levels Not Seen Since Winter

NPR 13 July, 2021 - 10:58am

In Springfield, Mo., firefighters are giving vaccine shots. Churches are scrambling to schedule vaccine clinics. Students and staff at summer school at the public schools are back to wearing masks.

Dozens of traveling nurses are due to arrive at one of the city's two biggest hospitals over the coming weeks; extra ventilators from around Missouri and Arkansas were transported to the other major hospital after it ran short over the July Fourth weekend.

The outbreak of COVID-19 in southwest Missouri and northern Arkansas has become the nation's largest and is mostly driven by the highly contagious delta variant. Officials warn it could continue to grow unchecked if vaccination rates stay low.

"We are truly in a very dangerous predicament," Springfield Mayor Ken McClure said Monday at a press conference. "While we are one of the unfortunate few early hot spots of the delta variant, we are not giving up. It is not too late. We need to stay the course."

In Missouri, the seven-day average of new cases is near 1,400 new positive cases each day, up more than 150% from a month ago. In Arkansas, that number is up 287%.

Caseload and hospitalization rates in the Ozarks region have reached levels not seen since the winter, officials said. In several counties across Missouri and Arkansas, caseloads have now reached or surpassed their winter peaks.

According to the most recent data available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the delta variant accounts for more than 73% of new cases in Missouri, by far the highest percentage of any state.

The Springfield-Greene County Health Department reported 17 new COVID-19 deaths in its most recent reporting period, which ended July 4. None had been fully vaccinated.

"Begging people to take the vaccine while there is still time. If you could see the exhaustion in the eyes of our nurses who keep zipping up body bags, we beg you," tweeted Steve Edwards, president and CEO of CoxHealth, a six-hospital system in southwest Missouri based in Springfield.

CoxHealth's hospital in Springfield was treating 125 COVID-19 patients as of Monday. The city's other major hospital, Mercy Hospital Springfield, reported 134 patients with COVID-19, including several children. More than 20 were on ventilators.

As a result of the influx, Mercy Hospital announced Sunday it was opening a sixth COVID-19 unit. Last year, it needed only five.

More than half of patients are from the rural counties around Springfield, according to Greene County health data.

There are few pandemic restrictions in place anymore in the southern part of Missouri, which is a haven for tourism in the summer. The lakes and rivers of the Ozarks attract tourists from around the region for camping, boating and lake house vacations. The city of Branson hosts dozens of live music shows every week. Memorial Day and July Fourth draw huge numbers of people to the area.

But many of the rural counties that make up this part of Missouri have among the lowest vaccination rates in the state. Overall, about 45% of Missourians have received their first shot, but in more than 20 counties in southern Missouri, fewer than a quarter of residents have done so.

"I think we were all hoping that we wouldn't see COVID much this summer, but it is definitely not the fact here in Springfield," said William Sistrunk, the lead infectious disease physician at Mercy Hospital, speaking to NPR.

Gov. Mike Parson has encouraged Missourians to get the vaccine, as he has done. He lifted the state's pandemic restrictions in May and has been vocal about Missourians' right to reject the vaccine if they choose. In June, he signed a bill limiting local governments' ability to enact public health restrictions.

Parson said last week he would oppose a door-to-door vaccination campaign by government workers.

"We all should be working together trying to find a solution to get more vaccine in more people's arms, not trying to force people to take it, not trying to scare them into it. Just make sure that they understand the facts," Parson said, speaking to reporters in Kansas City.

Local officials in southern Missouri, especially Springfield, are taking a more active stand in encouraging vaccinations.

On Monday, the mayor and local health officials held a press conference at a church the city has partnered with to distribute vaccines, where they denounced misinformation and politicization about vaccines.

Asked about the cheers over low vaccination rates at the Conservative Political Action Conference over the weekend, the county's acting health director said it was heartbreaking.

"To hear that people are cheering against the tool that can save lives when we're sitting in the middle of a crisis where people are dying – it breaks my heart," said Katie Towns, acting director of the county's health department.

Vaccination rates have risen slowly but steadily in this part of Missouri. Mercy Hospital Springfield is seeing more demand for vaccination appointments in recent days, officials said, and is now vaccinating roughly 250 people per day, up from about 150 earlier in the summer.

"Gradually in the past week or couple weeks we have seen a small increase in the number of people who are interested. I think hopefully they're realizing this is a pretty serious situation," Dr. Nancy Yoon, chief medical officer for the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, told NPR member station KCUR.

Now, the outbreak that began in the Ozarks has started to spread around the state. Case data and sewer surveillance are showing an uptick in the Kansas City and St. Louis metro areas, state officials said. In St. Louis County, the county with the state's third-highest vaccination rate, cases are up 63% over the last two weeks.

"Unfortunately, Missouri turned out to be among those several states that do have those vulnerable spots," Dr. George Turabelidze, state epidemiologist at the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, told St. Louis Public Radio. "Those are spots where people are under-vaccinated, where people have low natural immunity levels and [where] some communities assumed the pandemic was already behind us."

In Springfield, health care workers have braced for what they expect to be a long and challenging summer, as the number of people hospitalized in the county has persistently trended up.

"You feel like you're kind of beating your head on that proverbial brick wall trying to tell people, understand what we're seeing," Erik Frederick, chief administrative officer at Mercy Hospital, said in an interview with NPR.

"This is real. It's right here in front of us."

Springfield-Greene County Health Department explains vaccination door-to-door approach

KOLR - OzarksFirst.com 12 July, 2021 - 10:08pm

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Governor Mike Parson expressed he doesn’t want government employees going door-to-door in his state to urge people to get vaccinated.

However, Interim Director of the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, Katie Towns, says this has been a practice done years before the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Door-to-door approach is an age-old public health practice,” said Towns. “Greene County has used door-to-door representatives for years and we will continue to do so. We have members of the community we serve, so people who look just like us will be showing up to possibly talk about vaccines and to answer questions.”

The U.S. government is deploying a COVID-19 surge team to southwest Missouri because of the surge of COVID-19 cases lately. The surge of Covid-19 cases has become so high that hospitals in Springfield began transferring patients infected with the virus to other facilities.

Towns explained one surge team member of the U.S. Government is in Springfield and will be analyzing COVID-19 cases to help the Springfield-Greene County Health Department with ways to combat the surge.

“There has been alot of questions about the surge team,” said Towns. “We have one person who has been deployed from the CDC to come in and help us analyze the data around this variant and how it is spreading. She will also study which populations it is hitting most. The plan and scope of the project are still being established, and we are hoping to have that wrapped up sometime this week. We do have an additional person who will be working with us. Helping us with different avenues for communicating, tailoring messages, helping people understand and overcome hesitancy that might still exist.”

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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