Delta variant is forcing officials to rethink Covid-19 measures, even for the vaccinated

Health

KMOV.com 29 June, 2021 - 10:49am 59 views

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Doing this one thing "with no explanation after you've been vaccinated could be a sign of COVID-19."

The researchers behind the ZOE COVID Symptom Study—from King's College London, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Stanford University School of Medicine—have been tracking COVID patients' symptoms for more than a year. Lately, they said in a mid-June statement, "We've found that sneezing a lot is a more common sign of infection in those who've been vaccinated."

"Curiously, we did notice that people who had been vaccinated and then tested positive for COVID-19 were more likely to report sneezing as a symptom compared with those without a jab. ‍

If you've been vaccinated and start sneezing a lot without an explanation, you should definitely get a COVID test, especially if you are living or working around people who are at greater risk from the disease."

While incredibly effective—Pfizer and Moderna are about 95 percent effective against symptomatic COVID, while Johnson & Johnson is around 66 percent—the vaccines do not block COVID completely. The researchers say that in general, vaccinated people who do get COVID "experience the same kinds of symptoms as unvaccinated people do, but their illness is milder and shorter"—or they don't have symptoms at all. However, "sneezing a lot with no explanation after you've been vaccinated could be a sign of COVID-19."

The researchers also note that sneezing is a very efficient way for a virus to spread, as it sends contaminated particles flying into the air. They conclude that "sneezing a lot could be a potential sign that someone vaccinated has COVID-19 and, however mild, should take a test and self-isolate to protect their friends, family and colleagues."

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World passes 3 billion vaccine mark in race to contain Covid

Dhaka Tribune 29 June, 2021 - 10:55am

The pandemic has killed at least 3,932,561 people since the virus first emerged in December 2019

More than three billion Covid-19 vaccines have been administered around the world, an AFP tally found on Tuesday, as countries race to contain the virulent Delta variant that is fuelling outbreaks all over the globe.

The highly infectious strain of coronavirus has caught many nations off guard, with Russia reporting its highest daily death toll yet, Australia shutting down city after city and fears growing over major sporting events like Euro 2020 and the Olympic Games.

At least 3.9 million people have died from Covid-19, and while some wealthy countries are succeeding in bringing infections down thanks to strong vaccination drives, others where shots are not as readily available are struggling.

According to the tally, high-income countries as defined by the World Bank have administered an average of 79 doses per 100 inhabitants, with the United Arab Emirates, Bahrein and Israel taking the lead.

In low-income nations, the figure is just one shot per 100 people.

On Tuesday, foreign ministers from the Group of 20 major economies stressed the need for greater global cooperation in the face of the pandemic.

"Multilateral cooperation will be key to our collective ability to stop this global health crisis," US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told the ministers in the ancient Italian city of Matera.

Western leaders have pledged to donate one billion doses to poorer countries, but have been widely criticised for being too slow to help.

Vaccine hesitancy has also played a part in slow uptake.

In Russia, which recorded its highest daily death toll on Tuesday since the outbreak of the pandemic, officials have introduced mandatory shots for some groups of citizens to counter scepticism.

The country reported 652 coronavirus fatalities over the past 24 hours, with a record-high number of daily deaths -- 119 -- in Saint Petersburg, which is due to host a Euro 2020 quarter final on Friday.

Meanwhile Australian public anger is growing at the slow pace of vaccinations in a country that had been broadly successful in eliminating local transmission and leading an almost-normal life.

The Delta variant has pushed Sydney, Perth, Darwin and Brisbane into lockdown, meaning a total of more than 10 million Australians are having to stay home.

But so far, less than five% of adults are believed to have received both vaccine doses.

Brisbane resident Nicola Hungerford, 57, said she expected lockdowns to keep happening "until the government gets their bloody act together" on the vaccine rollout.

The speed of transmission of the Delta variant has fuelled concerns over ongoing or upcoming sporting events.

On Tuesday, Germany urged the British government to reduce the number of fans allowed into Wembley stadium for the final Euro 2020 matches.

"I think it's irresponsible for tens of thousands to gather in close proximity" in countries where the Delta variant is spreading, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer told Germany's Augsburger Allgemeine newspaper.

UEFA and the British authorities have said some 45,000 supporters will be allowed to attend a game between England and Germany on Tuesday afternoon, equivalent to 50% of capacity.

Attendance will be increased to 75%, or more than 60,000 fans, for the semi-finals and final at Wembley, in what will be the largest crowds at a sports event in Britain since the start of the pandemic.

The Delta variant was first identified in India, which suffered a vicious wave of coronavirus that overwhelmed hospitals and crematoriums at its height in April and May.

Now, bodies buried hastily along the banks of the Ganges river by families who could not afford funeral pyres have started to re-emerge as flooding dislodges them, a reminder of unspeakable human tragedies brought on by the virus.

Copyright Ⓒ 2012-2019. 2A Media Limited. All Rights Reserved.

8/C, FR Tower, Panthapath, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh.

Delta variant forcing officials to rethink COVID measures, even for the vaccinated | WTOP

WTOP 29 June, 2021 - 09:46am

The variant was first identified in India and is now considered a variant of concern by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning scientists believe it can spread more easily or cause more severe disease.

The Delta variant now accounts for about 1 in every 5 new coronavirus infections in the US, the CDC has said. And with more than half of the population still not fully vaccinated, according to the CDC, health experts and officials worry that regions with low amounts of virus protection could see surges in the fall and winter.

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS that in terms of Delta spread, the US is about a month or two behind the UK — a country that has been dealing with high numbers of cases despite relatively high vaccination rates. For those such countries, the World Health Organization advised last week that even the fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks.

Already in Los Angeles County, the pace of this variant’s spread has motivated officials to reinstate mask guidance for public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status.

Calling it a “precautionary measure,” the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the voluntary mask guidance Monday, saying it was necessary until health officials can “better understand how and to who the Delta variant is spreading.”

Experts have said that evidence points to vaccines like those from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech providing high amounts of protection against the variant, but LA Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said it is not clear what the future of the variant will be as it becomes more prevalent.

But not all local leaders are reinstating preventative guidance at this time.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced Monday that masks will not be mandatory in the state’s school buildings.

With more than two months until schools open, Murphy noted these rules could change depending on how the virus spreads and what the CDC decides.

“This is our best sense of what back to school looks like. It’s far more than an educated guess,” Murphy said.

For parents worrying over the possibility of regional variant surges in the fall, the time to vaccinate children for school is now.

Many large school systems — including Atlanta; Fort Myers, Florida; Flagstaff, Arizona; and the entire state of Hawaii — start school in the first two weeks of August.

It takes five weeks to be fully vaccinated with Pfizer’s vaccine, the only one authorized for adolescents ages 12 to 17. That means, for example, Atlanta students need to get their first shot by July 1 to be fully immunized by the first day of school on August 5.

Pfizer’s vaccine is given in two doses spaced three weeks apart. After the second dose, it takes two weeks for someone to be considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

As of June 24, nearly 1 in 5 children ages 12 to 15 were fully vaccinated and nearly 1 in 3 teens ages 16 and 17 were fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

Another question experts have been searching to answer as variants spread: How long does the protection from vaccines last?

A new study suggests that, unlike vaccines for the flu that need a yearly booster, the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should keep an immune response up for years.

The human body produces immune system components called antibodies to attack and neutralize an invader such as a virus. But these die off over time. To make sure of a long-term response, the body needs to keep the capacity to make more antibodies that can specifically respond to certain viruses or bacteria as needed. It does this with B-cells.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found people who got both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine had little factories called germinal centers that make B-cells that should specifically recognize the coronavirus, meaning there’s a possibility for long-lasting protection, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The CDC’s vaccine advisory committee has had discussions on potential booster shots as experts have been preparing for the possibility that immunity would wane quickly or that variants would elude the protection of current vaccines.

With officials still struggling to motivate the hesitant population to get vaccinated so the US can cross the threshold needed to control community spread, concerns have grown that mobilizing boosters would add yet another challenge.

And for those wanting the protection but fearing potential negative side effects, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday there is no evidence that Covid-19 vaccines affect fertility and the benefits of pregnant women getting vaccinated outweigh the risks.

Fauci noted that “tens and tens and tens of thousands of people” have received the vaccine while pregnant and before getting pregnant.

It’s clear that Covid-19 can be especially dangerous during pregnancy, he said at an online event hosted by the Health and Human Services Department.

“The mother can have an adverse pregnancy event, as can the fetus,” he said. “The best thing one can do to protect yourself is to actually get vaccinated.”

Copyright © 2021 by WTOP. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

Delta variant is forcing U.S. officials to rethink COVID-19 measures, even for the vaccinated

CTV News 29 June, 2021 - 07:34am

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The more dangerous and more transmissible Delta variant has spread to nearly every state in the U.S., feeding health experts' concern over potential COVID-19 spikes in the fall.

The variant was first identified in India and is now considered a variant of concern by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning scientists believe it can spread more easily or cause more severe disease.

The Delta variant now accounts for about one in every five new coronavirus infections in the U.S., the CDC has said. And with more than half of the population still not fully vaccinated, according to the CDC, health experts and officials worry that regions with low amounts of virus protection could see surges in the fall and winter.

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS that in terms of Delta spread, the U.S. is about a month or two behind the UK -- a country that has been dealing with high numbers of cases despite relatively high vaccination rates. For those such countries, the World Health Organization advised last week that even the fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks.

Already in Los Angeles County, the pace of this variant's spread has motivated officials to reinstate mask guidance for public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status.

Calling it a "precautionary measure," the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the voluntary mask guidance Monday, saying it was necessary until health officials can "better understand how and to who the Delta variant is spreading."

Experts have said that evidence points to vaccines like those from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech providing high amounts of protection against the variant, but LA Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said it is not clear what the future of the variant will be as it becomes more prevalent.

But not all local leaders are reinstating preventative guidance at this time.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced Monday that masks will not be mandatory in the state's school buildings.

With more than two months until schools open, Murphy noted these rules could change depending on how the virus spreads and what the CDC decides.

"This is our best sense of what back to school looks like. It's far more than an educated guess," Murphy said.

For parents worrying over the possibility of regional variant surges in the fall, the time to vaccinate children for school is now.

Many large school systems -- including Atlanta; Fort Myers, Florida; Flagstaff, Arizona; and the entire state of Hawaii -- start school in the first two weeks of August.

It takes five weeks to be fully vaccinated with Pfizer's vaccine, the only one authorized for adolescents ages 12 to 17. That means, for example, Atlanta students need to get their first shot by July 1 to be fully immunized by the first day of school on August 5.

Pfizer's vaccine is given in two doses spaced three weeks apart. After the second dose, it takes two weeks for someone to be considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

As of June 24, nearly 1 in 5 children ages 12 to 15 were fully vaccinated and nearly 1 in 3 teens ages 16 and 17 were fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

Another question experts have been searching to answer as variants spread: How long does the protection from vaccines last?

A new study suggests that, unlike vaccines for the flu that need a yearly booster, the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should keep an immune response up for years.

The human body produces immune system components called antibodies to attack and neutralize an invader such as a virus. But these die off over time. To make sure of a long-term response, the body needs to keep the capacity to make more antibodies that can specifically respond to certain viruses or bacteria as needed. It does this with B-cells.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found people who got both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine had little factories called germinal centres that make B-cells that should specifically recognize the coronavirus, meaning there's a possibility for long-lasting protection, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The CDC's vaccine advisory committee has had discussions on potential booster shots as experts have been preparing for the possibility that immunity would wane quickly or that variants would elude the protection of current vaccines.

With officials still struggling to motivate the hesitant population to get vaccinated so the U.S. can cross the threshold needed to control community spread, concerns have grown that mobilizing boosters would add yet another challenge.

And for those wanting the protection but fearing potential negative side effects, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility and the benefits of pregnant women getting vaccinated outweigh the risks.

Fauci noted that "tens and tens and tens of thousands of people" have received the vaccine while pregnant and before getting pregnant.

It's clear that COVID-19 can be especially dangerous during pregnancy, he said at an online event hosted by the Health and Human Services Department.

"The mother can have an adverse pregnancy event, as can the fetus," he said. "The best thing one can do to protect yourself is to actually get vaccinated."

Shoppers wear masks amid the COVID-19 pandemic on The Promenade Wednesday, June 9, 2021, in Santa Monica, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

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World passes three billion vaccine mark in race to contain COVID-19

Gulf News 29 June, 2021 - 06:40am

The highly infectious strain of coronavirus has caught many nations off guard, with Russia reporting its highest daily death toll yet, Australia shutting down city after city and fears growing over major sporting events like Euro 2020 and the Olympic Games.

At least 3.9 million people have died from COVID-19, and while some wealthy countries are succeeding in bringing infections down thanks to strong vaccination drives, others where shots are not as readily available are struggling.

According to the tally, high-income countries as defined by the World Bank have administered an average of 79 doses per 100 inhabitants, with the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Israel taking the lead. 

In low-income nations, the figure is just one shot per 100 people.

On Tuesday, foreign ministers from the Group of 20 major economies stressed the need for greater global cooperation in the face of the pandemic.

"Multilateral cooperation will be key to our collective ability to stop this global health crisis," US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told the ministers in the ancient Italian city of Matera.

Western leaders have pledged to donate one billion doses to poorer countries, but have been widely criticised for being too slow to help.

Vaccine hesitancy has also played a part in slow uptake.

In Russia, which recorded its highest daily death toll on Tuesday since the outbreak of the pandemic, officials have introduced mandatory shots for some groups of citizens to counter scepticism.

The country reported 652 coronavirus fatalities over the past 24 hours, with a record-high number of daily deaths - 119 - in Saint Petersburg, which is due to host a Euro 2020 quarter final on Friday.

Meanwhile Australian public anger is growing at the slow pace of vaccinations in a country that had been broadly successful in eliminating local transmission and leading an almost-normal life.

The Delta variant has pushed Sydney, Perth, Darwin and Brisbane into lockdown, meaning a total of more than 10 million Australians are having to stay home.

But so far, less than five percent of adults are believed to have received both vaccine doses.

Brisbane resident Nicola Hungerford, 57, said she expected lockdowns to keep happening "until the government gets their bloody act together" on the vaccine rollout.

"It's gobsmacking and they're just irresponsible. It shows how little respect they have for people," she told AFP.

The speed of transmission of the Delta variant has fuelled concerns over ongoing or upcoming sporting events.

On Tuesday, Germany urged the British government to reduce the number of fans allowed into Wembley stadium for the final Euro 2020 matches.

"I think it's irresponsible for tens of thousands to gather in close proximity" in countries where the Delta variant is spreading, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer told Germany's Augsburger Allgemeine newspaper.

UEFA and the British authorities have said some 45,000 supporters will be allowed to attend a game between England and Germany on Tuesday afternoon, equivalent to 50 percent of capacity.

Attendance will be increased to 75 percent, or more than 60,000 fans, for the semi-finals and final at Wembley, in what will be the largest crowds at a sports event in Britain since the start of the pandemic.

The Delta variant was first identified in India, which suffered a vicious wave of coronavirus that overwhelmed hospitals and crematoriums at its height in April and May.

Now, bodies buried hastily along the banks of the Ganges river by families who could not afford funeral pyres have started to re-emerge as flooding dislodges them, a reminder of unspeakable human tragedies brought on by the virus.

"It was really sad to see poor people burying their loved ones in an undignified manner, but the rising water level has

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World passes three billion vaccine mark in race to contain Covid - RFI

RFI 29 June, 2021 - 06:32am

More than three billion Covid-19 vaccines have been administered around the world, an AFP tally found Tuesday, as countries race to contain the virulent Delta variant that is fuelling outbreaks all over the globe.

The highly infectious strain of coronavirus has caught many nations off guard, with Russia reporting its highest daily death toll yet, Australia shutting down city after city and fears growing over major sporting events like Euro 2020 and the Olympic Games.

At least 3.9 million people have died from Covid-19, and while some wealthy countries are succeeding in bringing infections down thanks to strong vaccination drives, others where shots are not as readily available are struggling.

According to the tally, high-income countries as defined by the World Bank have administered an average of 79 doses per 100 inhabitants, with the United Arab Emirates, Bahrein and Israel taking the lead.

In low-income nations, the figure is just one shot per 100 people.

On Tuesday, foreign ministers from the Group of 20 major economies stressed the need for greater global cooperation in the face of the pandemic.

"Multilateral cooperation will be key to our collective ability to stop this global health crisis," US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told the ministers in the ancient Italian city of Matera.

Western leaders have pledged to donate one billion doses to poorer countries, but have been widely criticised for being too slow to help.

Vaccine hesitancy has also played a part in slow uptake.

In Russia, which recorded its highest daily death toll on Tuesday since the outbreak of the pandemic, officials have introduced mandatory shots for some groups of citizens to counter scepticism.

The country reported 652 coronavirus fatalities over the past 24 hours, with a record-high number of daily deaths -- 119 -- in Saint Petersburg, which is due to host a Euro 2020 quarter final on Friday.

Meanwhile Australian public anger is growing at the slow pace of vaccinations in a country that had been broadly successful in eliminating local transmission and leading an almost-normal life.

The Delta variant has pushed Sydney, Perth, Darwin and Brisbane into lockdown, meaning a total of more than 10 million Australians are having to stay home.

But so far, less than five percent of adults are believed to have received both vaccine doses.

Brisbane resident Nicola Hungerford, 57, said she expected lockdowns to keep happening "until the government gets their bloody act together" on the vaccine rollout.

"It's gobsmacking and they're just irresponsible. It shows how little respect they have for people," she told AFP.

The speed of transmission of the Delta variant has fuelled concerns over ongoing or upcoming sporting events.

On Tuesday, Germany urged the British government to reduce the number of fans allowed into Wembley stadium for the final Euro 2020 matches.

"I think it's irresponsible for tens of thousands to gather in close proximity" in countries where the Delta variant is spreading, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer told Germany's Augsburger Allgemeine newspaper.

UEFA and the British authorities have said some 45,000 supporters will be allowed to attend a game between England and Germany on Tuesday afternoon, equivalent to 50 percent of capacity.

Attendance will be increased to 75 percent, or more than 60,000 fans, for the semi-finals and final at Wembley, in what will be the largest crowds at a sports event in Britain since the start of the pandemic.

The Delta variant was first identified in India, which suffered a vicious wave of coronavirus that overwhelmed hospitals and crematoriums at its height in April and May.

Now, bodies buried hastily along the banks of the Ganges river by families who could not afford funeral pyres have started to re-emerge as flooding dislodges them, a reminder of unspeakable human tragedies brought on by the virus.

"There is always the fear of (a body) hitting the oar or (my boat) running over a dead body as the water level goes up."

Researchers investigate structure of unique coronavirus protein

Daily Californian 29 June, 2021 - 06:21am

As an independent student newspaper and the paper of record for the city of Berkeley, the Daily Cal has been communicating important updates during this pandemic. Your support is essential to maintaining this coverage.

By Lauren Huang | Staff

UC Berkeley researchers helped publish a study June 22 looking into the structure of a new protein expressed by the SARS-CoV-2 ORF3a gene, the discovery possibly leading to further strides against COVID-19.

The study, which was largely funded by the Fast Grants organization, found that one of the virus’s three proteins, the 3a protein, is unlike those that have been previously discovered, according to David Kern, a researcher for the study. Researchers also discovered that removal of the protein stifles the virus’s replicating efforts, making it a candidate for future vaccines.

“Of the accessory proteins, 3a seems like the one that is the most important to the virus’s function,” Kern said.

Kern used cryogenic electron microscopy and Thermo Fisher Scientific’s microscope technology to visualize the protein, a technical feat given its small size. The resulting image revealed a unique structure, according to Kern.

Research on the protein began in 2020, when the genome of SARS-CoV-2 was made public, according to a Berkeley News article.

“We started to look at it, thinking this is an interesting virus and thought it could become more serious than it seemed at the time,” said Stephen Brohawn, assistant professor in the campus department of molecular and cell biology and a research supervisor. “We found from work on SARS-CoV-1 that 3a might be an interesting target for therapeutics or vaccine development.”

The protein produced by ORF3a appears to be an ion channel, conducting positively charged ions across a cell membrane — allowing the signaling of pathways in the cell, according to the study.

Whereas most known ion channels fully cross through the membrane, the 3a protein only pierces halfway, according to the Berkeley News article. Its ions appear to trace the outside of the protein and continue across the membrane.

Campus researcher Ben Sorum measured the currents across the 3a protein channel.

“The whole idea was that — through the electrophysiology I was doing — we would be able to discover a specific drug that would block the 3a viroporin, and it would be a type of therapy given to individuals,” Sorum said.

Sorum noted that patients eligible to receive the drug in the future would include those who were unable to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Given further research into the 3a structure, drugs can be tested for their ability to impact the viral life cycle, according to Sorum.

“We’re very curious to find ways to push the protein to adapt the other kind of shapes that it does when it’s functioning in a cell … to understand how it works and moves,” Brohawn said.

The ORF3a gene is found in “a majority of coronaviruses,” Kern added. In the future, others will likely have the 3a protein, making the study’s findings significant to furthering drug and therapeutic developments.

Copyright © 2021 The Daily Californian, The Independent Berkeley Student Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy. Use desktop site by default. Mobile site.

If You're Vaccinated, This Is the Tell-Tale Sign You Have COVID, Study Says

Yahoo Lifestyle 27 June, 2021 - 07:05am

The researchers behind the ZOE COVID Symptom Study—from King's College London, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Stanford University School of Medicine—have been tracking COVID patients' symptoms for more than a year. Lately, they said in a mid-June statement, "We've found that sneezing a lot is a more common sign of infection in those who've been vaccinated."

The scientists point out that prior to recent data, sneezing was not normally considered a symptom of COVID-19. In fact, it was one of the ways to distinguish the virus from a cold, the flu, or allergies. But that may be changing. On their frequently asked questions page, the COVID Symptom Study researchers answered an inquiry about whether or not COVID-19 symptoms are different for vaccinated people. They responded:

"Curiously, we did notice that people who had been vaccinated and then tested positive for COVID-19 were more likely to report sneezing as a symptom compared with those without a jab. ‍

If you've been vaccinated and start sneezing a lot without an explanation, you should definitely get a COVID test, especially if you are living or working around people who are at greater risk from the disease."

While incredibly effective—Pfizer and Moderna are about 95 percent effective against symptomatic COVID, while Johnson&Johnson is around 66 percent—the vaccines do not block COVID completely. The researchers say that in general, vaccinated people who do get COVID "experience the same kinds of symptoms as unvaccinated people do, but their illness is milder and shorter"—or they don't have symptoms at all. However, "sneezing a lot with no explanation after you've been vaccinated could be a sign of COVID-19."

The researchers also note that sneezing is a very efficient way for a virus to spread, as it sends contaminated particles flying into the air. They conclude that "sneezing a lot could be a potential sign that someone vaccinated has COVID-19 and, however mild, should take a test and self-isolate to protect their friends, family and colleagues."

Here's what you need to know about keeping your vaccination records safe.

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As the delta variant of COVID-19 quickly becomes the most dominant strain of the virus around the world, the World Health Organization announced on Friday that even people who have been fully vaccinated should continue to follow coronavirus-specific safety measures, including wearing medical face masks and social distancing when around others. This announcement comes after several other health organizations and government officials have suggested that masks — both outdoors and indoors — are no l

Most people will have mild symptoms, but severe illness can lead to neurological issues.

The new policy will likely go into effect in phases later this summer.

Travelers will have to upload their vaccination card to Hawaii's Safe Travels website and bring a hard copy.

In Ohio, Holmes County - which has the highest concentration of Amish in the US - only 14% of its 44,000 residents are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

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