Did Dwayne Johnson Just Shade Vin Diesel? | Daily Pop | E! News

Entertainment

E! News 13 October, 2021 - 12:50pm

What did Dwayne Johnson say to Vin Diesel?

Dwayne Johnson revealed in a new interview with Vanity Fair that crew members on the “Fast & Furious” franchise thanked him after he called out Vin Diesel as a “chicken shit” and “candy ass” in a viral Instagram post, which revealed the extent to which Johnson and Diesel had been feuding during the making of the “Fast” ... IndieWireDwayne Johnson Says ‘Fast & Furious’ Crew ‘Quietly Thanked’ Him for Slamming Vin Diesel

Tune in to Peacock's Steals & Deals: Throwback Edition on TODAY All Day

In a recent Vanity Fair cover story, Johnson, 49, revealed that he once met with Diesel, 54, in an attempt to hash out some of their longstanding differences.

“Well, there was a meeting,” Johnson said. “I wouldn’t call it a peaceful meeting. I would call it a meeting of clarity. He and I had a good chat in my trailer, and it was out of that chat that it really became just crystal clear that we are two separate ends of the spectrum. And agreed to leave it there.”

“My female co-stars are always amazing and I love ’em,” Johnson’s 2016 Instagram post read in part, according to Vanity Fair. “My male co-stars however are a different story. Some conduct themselves as stand up men and true professionals, while others don’t. The ones that don’t are too chicken s-- to do anything about it anyway. Candy a----. When you watch this movie next April and it seems like I’m not acting in some of these scenes and my blood is legit boiling — you’re right.”

While Johnson did not call out Diesel by name in the post, many people speculated that he was at least partly referring to the “Chronicles of Riddick” actor.

The action stars have never opened up about the specifics of their disagreement, but their conflict apparently ran deep enough that Johnson only agreed to appear in the 2017 movie “The Fate of the Furious” if he did not have to share any scenes with Diesel.

“I wanted to forgo drama,” Johnson told Vanity Fair. “I thought that that was the best thing to do. For everybody.”

He also revealed that crew members thanked him for his candid 2016 post.

"Interestingly enough … (it was) as if every single crew member found their way to me and either quietly thanked me or sent me a note,” he said.

At the same time, he expressed regret for the post, which he acknowledged “caused a firestorm.”

He added that he and Diesel are “philosophically two different people, and we approach the business of moviemaking in two very different ways.”

Diesel has also spoken out indirectly about Johnson, telling USA Today in 2017 that speculation about their feud was “blown out of proportion.”

"I protect the franchise. I protect everybody including Dwayne,” said Diesel, who served as a producer of “Fate of the Furious.” “I protected Dwayne more than he’ll ever know. And it doesn’t matter. He doesn’t have to know. But he appreciates it … Dwayne has only got one Vin in his life. Dwayne Johnson only has one big brother in this film world and that’s me."

Johnson responded to this comment in his recent Vanity Fair interview, saying, “I have one big brother and it’s my half brother. And that’s it.”

Lindsay Lowe has been a regular contributor to TODAY.com since 2016, covering pop culture, style, home and other lifestyle topics. She is also working on her first novel, a domestic drama set in rural Regency England.

Read full article at E! News

Dwayne Johnson Opens Up About His Feud With Vin Diesel

ET Canada 14 October, 2021 - 08:30am

Dwayne Johnson Gets Honest About His Long-Standing Feud With Vin Diesel

Access 14 October, 2021 - 08:30am

Audio for this article is not available at this time.

This translation has been automatically generated and has not been verified for accuracy. Full Disclaimer

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has opened a broad inquiry into how Wall Street banks are keeping track of employees’ digital communications, three people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

SEC enforcement staff contacted multiple banks in recent weeks to check whether they have been adequately documenting employees’ work-related communications, such as text messages and emails, with a focus on their personal devices, said the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The industry “sweep” is a further sign that the SEC is ramping up enforcement under its Democratic leadership, and highlights the challenges Wall Street banks face keeping track of staff communications in the work-from-home pandemic era.

The SEC periodically conducts sweeps to quickly gather information on issues it suspects may be widespread. Sweeps can sometimes, although not necessarily, lead to formal probes.

The sweep appears to stem from a probe the agency has been conducting for some time into an individual financial institution, two of the sources said, without naming the firm.

In August, JPMorgan Chase & Co disclosed that it had been fielding regulatory inquiries concerning its “compliance with records preservation requirements in connection with business communications sent over electronic messaging channels” that the bank had not approved. It said it was discussing a “resolution” with regulators, without specifying which ones.

Spokespeople for the SEC and JPMorgan declined to comment.

The SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Wall Street’s self-regulatory body, require broker-dealers to keep records of all business-related communications. Banks have to walk a fine line to comply with those requirements without infringing upon employees’ privacy, said one of the sources.

In the United States, there is no clear-cut legal basis on which an employer can demand to inspect employees’ personal communications, while in other countries doing so may breach data protection statutes, the source said.

As a result, many financial firms ban the use of personal e-mail, texts and other social media channels for work purposes, but keeping up with a proliferation of communication apps – especially during the pandemic – is a challenge for companies.

In a speech last week, the SEC’s head of enforcement Gurbir Grewal warned that institutions should stay on top of the many “issues raised by the increased use of personal devices, new communications channels, and other technological developments.”

Failure to retain and produce communication records can impede regulatory investigations, Grewal said in the remarks.

Last year, Morgan Stanley fired two top executives due to the unauthorized use of WhatsApp to discuss work matters.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Read most recent letters to the editor.

© Copyright 2021 The Globe and Mail Inc. All rights reserved.

Everything About The Rock's First Official Rap Verse Is Funny

Stereogum 14 October, 2021 - 08:30am

Tune in to Peacock's Steals & Deals: Throwback Edition on TODAY All Day

In a recent Vanity Fair cover story, Johnson, 49, revealed that he once met with Diesel, 54, in an attempt to hash out some of their longstanding differences.

“Well, there was a meeting,” Johnson said. “I wouldn’t call it a peaceful meeting. I would call it a meeting of clarity. He and I had a good chat in my trailer, and it was out of that chat that it really became just crystal clear that we are two separate ends of the spectrum. And agreed to leave it there.”

“My female co-stars are always amazing and I love ’em,” Johnson’s 2016 Instagram post read in part, according to Vanity Fair. “My male co-stars however are a different story. Some conduct themselves as stand up men and true professionals, while others don’t. The ones that don’t are too chicken s-- to do anything about it anyway. Candy a----. When you watch this movie next April and it seems like I’m not acting in some of these scenes and my blood is legit boiling — you’re right.”

While Johnson did not call out Diesel by name in the post, many people speculated that he was at least partly referring to the “Chronicles of Riddick” actor.

The action stars have never opened up about the specifics of their disagreement, but their conflict apparently ran deep enough that Johnson only agreed to appear in the 2017 movie “The Fate of the Furious” if he did not have to share any scenes with Diesel.

“I wanted to forgo drama,” Johnson told Vanity Fair. “I thought that that was the best thing to do. For everybody.”

He also revealed that crew members thanked him for his candid 2016 post.

"Interestingly enough … (it was) as if every single crew member found their way to me and either quietly thanked me or sent me a note,” he said.

At the same time, he expressed regret for the post, which he acknowledged “caused a firestorm.”

He added that he and Diesel are “philosophically two different people, and we approach the business of moviemaking in two very different ways.”

Diesel has also spoken out indirectly about Johnson, telling USA Today in 2017 that speculation about their feud was “blown out of proportion.”

"I protect the franchise. I protect everybody including Dwayne,” said Diesel, who served as a producer of “Fate of the Furious.” “I protected Dwayne more than he’ll ever know. And it doesn’t matter. He doesn’t have to know. But he appreciates it … Dwayne has only got one Vin in his life. Dwayne Johnson only has one big brother in this film world and that’s me."

Johnson responded to this comment in his recent Vanity Fair interview, saying, “I have one big brother and it’s my half brother. And that’s it.”

Lindsay Lowe has been a regular contributor to TODAY.com since 2016, covering pop culture, style, home and other lifestyle topics. She is also working on her first novel, a domestic drama set in rural Regency England.

Entertainment Stories

JCPenney