Dusty Hill dead latest – ZZ Top member Billy Gibbons says band will carry on as bassist’s cause of death re...

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The US Sun 30 July, 2021 - 01:30pm 60 views

What did ZZ Hill die of?

While touring in February 1984, Hill was involved in a car crash. He continued performing, but he died two months later, at the age of 48, from a heart attack arising from a blood clot formed after the accident. wikipedia.orgZZ Hill

How old was dusty hill?

Dusty Hill, the bass player who anchored the rock 'n' roll band ZZ Top for more than 50 years, has died at age 72. Los Angeles TimesZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill dies at 72

Did a ZZ Top member dies?

The band's surviving members, Billy Gibbons and Frank Beard confirmed Hill's death in a statement shared on Facebook and said their longtime friend and bandmate had died in his sleep. "We are saddened by the news today that our Compadre, Dusty Hill, has passed away in his sleep at home in Houston, TX. NBC 5 Dallas-Fort WorthZZ Top's Iconic Bassist Dusty Hill Dies at 72

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ZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill has died after suffering hip issues — but the band will carry on as the bassist's cause of death remains unclear, according to reports.

In a statement to Eddie Trunk, the host of SiriusXM's Trunk Nation, band member Billy Gibbons said the band will carry on.

The statement, according to Trunk Nation, read: "As Dusty said upon his departure, 'Let the show go on!' And… with respect, we’ll do well to get beyond this and honor his wishes."

The 72-year-old rock icon passed away in his sleep at his home in Houston, Texas, the band confirmed on Wednesday.

Hill recently suffered from a hip injury that forced him to drop out of several shows over the past week. However, it is not clear if that is related to his sudden death.

BOOTSY COLLINS: DUSTY WAS A 'LEGEND OF THE ROCK & ROLL EMPIRE'

Musician Bootsy Collins paid tribute to the late star.

"We lost another loving Giant legend of the Rock & Roll Empire, Mr. Dusty Hill," Collins wrote.

Danggit! We lost another loving Giant legend of the Rock & Roll Empire, Mr. Dusty Hill.🙏😧 Prayer's going out to his Family & Friends...Thx u for blessing us all with ur gifts. R.I.P. pic.twitter.com/ks06yMtwjq

At the time of his death, the legendary bassist was married to his long-time girlfriend, Charleen McCrory.

Despite McCrory and Hill’s decade-plus long relationship, the two never had children together.

However, Hill had a daughter, Charity Hill, from a previous relationship before his rock and roll days.

BANDMATES' STATEMENT ON DUSTY HILL'S PASSING

"We are saddened by the news today that our Compadre, Dusty Hill, has passed away in his sleep at home in Houston, TX," bandmates Billy Gibbons and Frank Beard wrote in a statement.

“We, along with legions of ZZ Top fans around the world, will miss your steadfast presence, your good nature and enduring commitment to providing that monumental bottom to the ‘Top,'” Gibbons and Beard continued.

“We will forever be connected to that ‘Blues Shuffle in C.’ You will be missed greatly, amigo.”

WHAT WAS DUSTY HILL'S NET WORTH?

According to Celebrity Net Worth, Hill had an estimated net worth of $60million.

His extensive worth comes from his career as a musician.

In the United States alone, ZZ Top has sold over 25 million albums over the years.

Their best-selling album is Eliminator that was released in March 1983, the album contains five hit singles that the band still performs today.

Flea, the bassist and founding member of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, paid tribute to the late Dusty Hill.

Ahhhh man, I love Dusty Hill. A true rocker. What a straight jammer https://t.co/k6L53JlhW6

Gibson - an American manufacturer of guitars - also paid tribute to the late Dusty Hill.

We are saddened to hear of the passing of Dusty Hill. Thank you for the years of music, rock, and funky bass licks. Rest in Power Dusty Hill, there will never be another like you. Our condolences to Dusty's friends, family and fans.  We are thinking of all of you. pic.twitter.com/dQVwJJTrTS

Guitarist Zakk Wylde paid tribute to Dusty Hill.

GOD BLESS DUSTY HILL • 1949 - 2O21 • tBLSt SDMF @ZZTop pic.twitter.com/UNhQJQKBan

DUSTY WAS A JACK OF ALL MUSICAL TRADES

Joseph Michael “Dusty” Hill was an American musician, singer, and songwriter.

As one of the band's founding members, Dusty was known as a jack of all trades as he played bass guitar, sang backing and lead vocals, and keyboards over the years.

ACTRESS MORGAN FAIRCHILD 'DEVASTATED' ABOUT DUSTY HILL'S DEATH

"Just devastated to hear of the death of Dusty Hill. We knew each other since high school, when my then-boyfriend was the drummer in 1 of Dusty’s early bands w his brother, Rocky," Fairchild wrote on Twitter.

Just devastated to hear of the death of Dusty Hill. We knew each other since high school, when my then-boyfriend was the drummer in 1 of Dusty’s early bands w his brother, Rocky. Spent many an evening at those early gigs together. RIPDusty #RIPDustyHill pic.twitter.com/HMmwv95s3Y

The Rolling Stones' Keith Richards remembered Dusty Hill in a tweet.

R.I.P Dusty Hill🙏 pic.twitter.com/OzxhVMblY5

World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. (WWE) staffers wrote: "WWE is saddened to learn that Dusty Hill of ZZ Top passed away at the age of 72.

"The Dallas native left an indelible mark on the music industry as the bassist for The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame-inducted ZZ Top. Hill and his bandmate Billy Gibbons were fans of WWE, and the iconic, bearded duo hosted the July 20, 2009, episode of Monday Night Raw from Raleigh, North Carolina. The unmistakable bandmates were often found ringside at other WWE events, including Unforgiven 2005.

"With classic hits such as 'Sharp Dressed Man,' 'Gimme All Your Lovin’' and more, ZZ Top left a legendary legacy across 15 studio albums with over 50 million records sold worldwide.

"WWE extends its condolences to Hill’s family, friends and fans."

Former CBS News anchor Dan Rather paid tribute to Dusty Hill in the news of his passing.

"May he Rest in Peace and rock the heavens," Rather wrote.

A legend. May he Rest In Peace and rock the heavens. https://t.co/Ds1sGSIREm

OZZY OSBOURNE SHARED PICS OF HIM WITH DUSTY HILL

In remembrance of Dusty Hill, Ozzy Osbourne tweeted pictures of him alongside the late star.

Rest In Peace #DustyHill of @ZZTop. My thoughts go out to @BillyfGibbons and Frank Beard and all the #ZZTop fans around the world pic.twitter.com/FLu71RF62V

PHOTOS FROM ZZ TOP CONCERTS CIRCULATE

A 1971 photo of ZZ Top garnered over 1,000 likes on Twitter after Dusty Hill's death was announced.

Dusty Hill (bass), Billy F. Gibbons (guitar) and Frank Beard aka ZZ Top circa 1971. pic.twitter.com/SSF1mmEqjI

World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. (WWE) staffers wrote: “WWE is saddened to learn that Dusty Hill of ZZ Top passed away at the age of 72.

“The Dallas native left an indelible mark on the music industry as the bassist for The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame-inducted ZZ Top. Hill and his bandmate Billy Gibbons were fans of WWE, and the iconic, bearded duo hosted the July 20, 2009, episode of Monday Night Raw from Raleigh, North Carolina. The unmistakable bandmates were often found ringside at other WWE events, including Unforgiven 2005.

“With classic hits such as ‘Sharp Dressed Man,’ ‘Gimme All Your Lovin’’ and more, ZZ Top left a legendary legacy across 15 studio albums with over 50 million records sold worldwide.

“WWE extends its condolences to Hill’s family, friends and fans.”

Flea, the bassist and founding member of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, paid tribute to the late Dusty Hill.

Ahhhh man, I love Dusty Hill. A true rocker. What a straight jammer https://t.co/k6L53JlhW6

DUSTY HILL WAS SUBBED OUT AFTER HIP INJURY

On Friday, the band let fans know about the change to their line-up, explaining that Elwood Francis, their longtime guitar tech, would be filling in for Dusty while he was out with his hip injury.

The members of ZZ Top, Billy, and Frank, would like to share that Dusty, their fearless Bass player, is on a short detour back to Texas, to address a hip issue,” the statement said.

“They await a speedy recovery and have him back pronto.”

KATHY VALENTINE CALLS DUSTY HILL 'A TEXAS ICON'

Kathy Valentine, a member of the Go-Go's, paid tribute to Dusty Hill, calling him "a Texas icon."

Dusty Hill, @ZZTop bassist has passed away. He sang some great cuts, Heard it on the X, BD&HR (fans know) -but his rendidtion of Teddy Bear is just lo-down sick&awesome. RIP Dusty, a Texas iconhttps://t.co/TdJZysfgm6

In a statement to Eddie Trunk, the host of SiriusXM's Trunk Nation, band member Billy Gibbons said the band will carry on.

"As Dusty said upon his departure, 'Let the show go on!' And… with respect, we’ll do well to get beyond this and honor his wishes," the statement reportedly read.

KISS SINGER PAUL STANLEY CALLED DUSTY HILL AN ICON

KISS singer Paul Stanley paid tribute to Dusty Hill as well.

"I don’t know what to say but 'Thank you' and 'Rest however you damn well choose!'" Stanley tweeted.

WOW! Dusty Hill. What an icon. @ZZTop ’s bassist forever. So unique. Always a gentleman from the days of us opening for them through the recent days of them opening for us. I don’t know what to say but “Thank you” and “Rest however you damn well choose!” https://t.co/tHfjLy1xbj

Since 2002, Hill was married to Charleen McCrory.

McCrory is a former actress who starred in the 1996 film Alien Vows.

After a decade-long relationship, the two married in Houston, TX.

McCrory is known for staying out of the spotlight despite her high-profile relationship and not much information is available on her.

DUSTY HILL AND WIFE CHARLENE

Dusty Hill was photographed with his wife, Charlene "Chuck" Hill, in 2011 at the Texas Medal of Arts Awards ceremony.

ZZ TOP INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME

In 2004, Dusty Hill and the other members of ZZ Top were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

BAND CONFIRMED HILL'S DEATH IN SOCIAL MEDIA POST

ZZ Top confirmed that their bassist, Dusty Hill, had died in social media posts on Wednesday.

The devastating post was signed by Hill's bandmates, Frank and Billy.

DUSTY WAS A JACK OF ALL MUSICAL TRADES

Joseph Michael “Dusty” Hill was an American musician, singer, and songwriter.

As one of the founding members of the band, Dusty was known as a jack of all trades as he played bass guitar, sang backing and lead vocals, and keyboards over the years.

Read full article at The US Sun

"Let Dusty Sing One!" ZZ Top’s Dusty Hill (1949-2021) and the Pursuit of the Perfect Note

Austin Chronicle 30 July, 2021 - 12:00am

I am crying. If you are Texan, you are too.

If you’re like me, you’re weeping, eating barbecue, and blasting Fandango! It’s only appropriate, when a member of ZZ Top passes away, as bassist Dusty Hill did in his sleep at his home in Houston, Tuesday night, July 27, 2021, according to a statement released Wednesday afternoon by bandmates Frank Beard and Billy F. Gibbons.

“We, along with legions of ZZ Top fans around the world, will miss your steadfast presence, your good nature and enduring commitment to providing that monumental bottom to the ’Top’,” wrote Beard and Gibbons. “We will forever be connected to that ’Blues Shuffle in C.’

“You will be missed greatly, amigo,” they concluded.

Hill was the glue of ZZ Top, their secret weapon. His tone was fat, his touch perfect. They may have been doing their Lone Star take on the loud, rocked-up blues format that English bands like Cream favored. But ZZ Top wasn’t using blues as an excuse for masturbatory instrumental passages. Every member of the band was committed to playing one note, but it was the perfect note, so full of juicy tone that it would lay perfectly in place. And then they would ride that note to death.

“I met Dusty when I was maybe 15 or 16, playing in different bands in Dallas,” Beard drawled at me backstage at the Alamodome on Dec. 7th, 2013, when I interviewed him for an Austin Chronicle ZZ Top cover story. (See “Tracking The Beards,” Dec. 27, 2013.) “We started playing together in the American Blues [with Rocky Hill, Dusty’s brother] in about ’66, ’67, something like that. Made a couple of records, and as bands do, we broke up. Then I got a call from another buddy from Dallas. [Early ZZ Top bassist] Billy Etheridge was down in Houston, and he started playing with Billy [Gibbons]. He said, ’Hey, I found this great guitarist down here. I’ve been playing with him, but the drummer’s not cutting it. We need you.’ So, I packed up all my drums and threw ’em in this Volkswagen I had and went down there. I jammed with Billy and Billy Etheridge, and got hired right on the spot. Then two months later, Billy Etheridge’s wife was a Braniff stewardess, and she got transferred to Tulsa. So, he quit. I said, ’Well, I know a guy in Dallas who can fill in for us.’ That was Dusty, and that was ’69. Been together ever since.”

“It was Frank that found the expression that was probably the most appealing,” added Gibbons in his clipped, measured tones an hour later. “He said, ’Hey, since we’re talking about bass players, there’s a guy that I’ve worked with since I was 14.’ I mean, we were 18 then, boy!” he laughed.

“But that was a remarkable connection that was of value,” he concluded. “Because I was fortunate enough to have stepped into this powerhouse bass player/drummer relationship that was unrelenting. Then once the three of us gelled, it was ’Let’s go!’

“Frank and Dusty have worked together since they were 14,” he mused the next day, in his suite at the San Antonio Grand Hyatt. “They’re by no means reduced to just sidemen. However, the functionary positioning as sidemen is to lay down a platform that makes it the most beneficial springboard. Dude, I can go just crazy, and there they are, providing that platform. Probably one of the reasons it has worked so well for so long is they enjoy being the chassis, the railbed. And I get to be the gear grinder.”

“I’d toyed around with three-piece groups before,” Hill recalled backstage at the Alamodome 12 hours earlier, in a twang perched somewhere between his bandmates’. “And I think Billy had. But I don’t think until the three of us played together did it ever sound like more. It was just the way we played. Y’know, the first song we played together – well, it wasn’t a song. It was a shuffle in C done on the spot. And it was long. We just kept playing it, because it felt so good. All of this sounds like hype, but this is true.”

“Well, as a band member yourself, you know those moments where you say, ’Alright, let’s just do three minutes and just see what happens,’" Gibbons smiled at his longtime bandmate. “But three hours later, everyone is still doing it and smiling. Because it just feels so good.”

“Like Billy said, Frank and I were fortunate in that we’d played in bands together and we’d found a rhythmic relationship to set Billy up,” shrugged Hill. “But yeah, it just felt really good from the beginning and it was stunning. ’Whoa!’”

They rode that simple, effective groove from the hard-grindin’ Texas boogie of 1970’s ZZ Top’s First Album through the mega-selling proto-electronica of Eliminator, all the way to 2012’s back-to-the-boogie La Futura, their last studio release. It was always about their deep blues roots, that “shuffle in C.” You could sprinkle any sort of fairy dust atop that, and it would be solid, in a large part because of Hill digging consistently into The Perfect Note.

"When we did Eliminator, at the time, it was experimental for us,” Hill recalled. “It obviously turned out real successful, but at the time, we caught crap about it from some of our old fans. They thought we were deserting our roots or our old style or whatever. I never understood it, because what we do in the studio, we don’t do for anyone else. We just do it. And that’s what was created then.”

Another thing Hill brought to that Lil’ Ol’ Band From Texas: his voice. He had a wailing vocal style that was a favorite for many fans. “Tush” or the ZZ Top version of “Jailhouse Rock” could tear a crowd apart like little else, in a large part due to Hill’s lead vocals.

“In the beginning, we were playing a show,” Beard chuckled. “I think it was at the Cotton Bowl. It was 50,000 people there or whatever, but you could hear this one voice crying out from the crowd: ’LET DUSTY SING ONE!’

“It was his mom!” he laughed. “She was about 60 years old at the time! So, we’ve always got to think about that one: ’Let Dusty sing one!’

He smiled, taking another puff on his cigarette. “I like the ones Dusty sings.”

“That’s true, yes!” Hill roared via telephone two days later. “The thing is, my mom, bless her heart, she was my biggest fan all my life. Every band I was in before this one, I did all the singing. So, she wasn’t quite used to the shared responsibility!” he laughed. “A good Texas mother. But not everybody’s mother would yell that in front of everybody.”

A good Texas mother for a good Texas boy. And ZZ Top showed the world a better, hipper way of being a Texan, one that wasn’t quite so rural.

“Most things that ever worked for us weren’t really planned out or anything,” Hill mused. “I think that’s true with most people. But all we did was take what we were and brought it forward. Yeah, we obviously had a great amount of pride in being from Texas. It all bloomed out of the ’70s. We were bunched up with a bunch of Southern bands, and there’s nothing wrong with that at all. We just wanted to make it clear we weren’t a Southern rock band – that’s more like Georgia, I think. We were more of a Texas band.”

No one carried that Texas-ness more than Dusty Hill. No matter how flashy ZZ Top got through their entire career, Hill was the one member who continually looked like he’d stepped off the cover of 1975’s Fandango!: crisp cowboy hat, Nudie rhinestone Buck Owens suit, boots.

“The whole attitude is probably a little less rural,” he concluded. “But that’s no bother for us. We’re from the city. So, it’s easier for us to put that stamp on it.”

Hill, Gibbons, and Beard kept putting that stamp on it for 51 years, until last week. A news item at their website posted on the July 23 announced that Hill was “on a short detour back to Texas, to address a hip issue. They await his speedy recovery and to have him back pronto.” Longtime guitar tech Elwood Francis deputized for the bassist for last week’s shows, complete with a flowing beard grown during COVID lockdown. Now comes the news that Dusty Hill will not be back pronto. He will not be back, period.

How will I choose to remember Dusty Hill? The moment we were introduced backstage at the Alamodome, approximately 8:12pm CST, Dec. 7, 2013. He shook my hand fervently, and stared down at the three-inch pin adorning the lapel of my pea coat, depicting a certain punk icon on all fours. “Who’s that on your button?” he drawled.

"Iggy Pop in 1972," I replied.

"Ah, good," he smiled. "Making a spectacle of himself, as usual. Hell, we’ll be making spectacles out of ourselves in about an hour!”

Rest in peace. And always let Dusty sing one.

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Dusty Hill, Long-Bearded Bassist for ZZ Top, Dies at 72

The New York Times 28 July, 2021 - 06:19pm

The band, known for its hard-charging, blues-inflected rock, was one of the biggest acts of the 1980s, selling more than 50 million albums.

Dusty Hill, the quiet, bearded bass player who made up one third of ZZ Top, among the best-selling rock bands of the 1980s, has died at his home in Houston. He was 72.

His bandmates Frank Beard and Billy Gibbons announced the death on Wednesday through Facebook and Instagram. They did not provide a cause or say when he died.

Starting in the early 1970s, ZZ Top racked up dozens of hit records and packed hundreds of arenas a year with their powerful blend of boogie, Southern rock and blues. But the band really took off in the 1980s, when Mr. Gibbons, the lead singer and guitarist, and Mr. Hill grew their signature 20-inch beards and the band released a series of albums that added New Wave synthesizers — often played by Mr. Hill — to their hard-driving guitars, producing MTV-friendly hits like “Legs” and “Sharp-Dressed Man.”

The band paired their grungy sound and innuendo-filled lyrics with a knowing, sometimes comic stage act — Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibbons, in matching sunglasses and Stetson hats, would swing their hips in unison, spinning their instruments on mounts attached to their belts. (Despite his name, Mr. Beard, the drummer, sports just a mustache.) Their stage sets might include crushed cars and even livestock.

Though in public Mr. Hill and Mr. Gibbons were often mistaken as twins, their musical styles differed — Mr. Gibbons a showy virtuoso, Mr. Hill a grinding, precise musical mechanic.

Mr. Hill rarely gave interviews, preferring to let Mr. Gibbons speak for the band. And he gladly accepted his supporting role for his bandmate’s masterful lead guitar playing.

“Sometimes you don’t even notice the bass,” he said in a 2016 interview. “I hate that in a way, but I love that in a way. That’s a compliment. That means you’ve filled in everything and it’s right for the song, and you’re not standing out where you don’t need to be.”

Joseph Michael Hill was born in Dallas on May 19, 1949. He started his musical career singing and playing cello, but he switched instruments at 13, when his brother, Rocky, who played guitar, said his band needed a bassist. One day Dusty came home to find a bass on his bed; that night, he joined Rocky onstage at a Dallas beer joint.

“I started playing that night by putting my finger on the fret, and when the time came to change, my brother would hit me on the shoulder,” he said in a 2012 interview.

In 1969, Dusty was living in Houston and working with the blues singer Lightnin’ Hopkins when Mr. Beard, a friend from high school, suggested that he audition for an open spot in a trio, called ZZ Top, recently founded by Mr. Gibbons. They played their first show together in February 1970.

The band’s humor was evident from the start: They named their first album “ZZ Top’s First Album.” Real success came in 1973 with their third release, “Tres Hombres,” which cracked the Billboard top 10. That same year they opened for the Rolling Stones in Hawaii.

Many of their early songs leaned heavily on sexual innuendo, though sometimes they set the innuendo aside completely. “La Grange,” their big hit on “Tres Hombres,” was about a bordello.

In 1976, after a string of hit albums and nearly seven years of constant touring, the band took a three-year hiatus. Mr. Hill returned to Dallas, where he worked at the airport and tried to avoid being identified by fans.

“I had a short beard, regular length, and if you take off the hat and shades and wear work clothes and put ‘Joe’ on my work shirt, people are not expecting to see you,” he said in a 2019 interview. “Now, a couple of times, a couple of people did ask me, and I just lied, and I said: ‘No! Do you think I’d be sitting here?’”

The band reunited in 1979 to release “Degüello,” their first album to go platinum, and the first time Mr. Gibbons and Mr. Hill grew out their beards. It was also the first sign that they were going beyond their Texas roots by adding a New Wave flavor to their sound, with Mr. Hill also playing keyboard.

They achieved superstar status in 1983 with “Eliminator,” which included hit singles like “Legs,” “Sharp Dressed Man” and “Give Me All Your Lovin.’” It sold 10 million copies and stayed on the Billboard charts for 183 weeks.

In 1984, Mr. Hill made headlines when he accidentally shot himself in the stomach. As a girlfriend was taking off his boot, a .38 Derringer slipped out, hit the floor and went off.

The band’s success continued through the 1980s, and while later albums — in which they returned to their Texan blues roots — didn’t climb the charts, the trio still packed stadiums. And despite their raunchy stylings, they began to draw grudging respect from critics, who often singled out Mr. Hill’s subtly masterful bass playing.

“My sound is big, heavy and a bit distorted because it has to overlap the guitar,” he said in a 2000 interview. “Someone once asked me to describe my tone, and I said it was like farting in a trash can. What I meant is it’s raw, but you’ve got to have the tone in there.”

ZZ Top was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2004.

Mr. Hill married his longtime girlfriend, Charleen McCrory, an actress, in 2002. He also had a daughter. Information on survivors was not immediately available.

In 2014 he injured his hip after a fall on his tour bus. He required surgery, and part of the tour had to be canceled. On July 23, he left their latest tour, citing problems with his hip. It is unclear whether that had any connection to his death.

Contrary to their image — and the hard partying that their music seemed to encourage — Mr. Hill and his bandmates kept a low, relatively sober profile. And they remained close friends, even after 50 years of near-constant touring.

“People ask how we’ve stayed together so long,” he told The Charlotte Observer in 2015. “I say separate tour buses. We got separate tour buses early on, when we probably couldn’t afford them. That way we were always glad to see each other when we got to the next city.”

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