Enhanced Video Shows Dust During Ingenuity's Flight

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NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 20 April, 2021 - 08:23pm 32 views

Did ingenuity fly on Mars?

Ingenuity, NASA's first helicopter flight on another planet, flies autonomously and has special features to help it stay aloft in the thin Martian atmosphere. Transmits flight data to the Perseverance rover, which relays it via satellite to Earth. The Wall Street JournalNASA’s Mars Helicopter Ingenuity Makes Historic First Flight

Read full article at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA helicopter successfully completes maiden flight

CGTN America 20 April, 2021 - 11:10pm

First Video of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter in Flight – Including Takeoff and Landing

SciTechDaily 20 April, 2021 - 05:27pm

In this video captured by NASA’s Perseverance rover, the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter took the first powered, controlled flight on another planet on April 19, 2021.

The rover was parked at “Van Zyl Overlook,” about 211 feet (64.3 meters) away in Mars’ Jezero Crater and chronicled the flight operations with its cameras.

These images from the rover’s Mastcam-Z cameras show the helicopter hovering above the Red Planet’s surface. During this first flight, the helicopter climbed to an altitude of 10 feet (3 meters), hovered, and then touched back down on the surface of Mars.

The location where NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover observed the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s first powered controlled flight at Mars is called “Van Zyl Overlook,” after Jakob van Zyl. Van Zyl was the team’s longtime colleague, mentor, and leader at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. He passed away unexpectedly in August 2020, about a month after the launch of Perseverance. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Ingenuity is a technology demonstration. The 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) rotorcraft will help determine whether future explorations on Mars could include an aerial perspective.

Perseverance touched down at “Octavia E. Butler Landing” with Ingenuity attached to its belly on February 18, 2021. The helicopter was deployed to the surface on April 3.

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Ingenuity has flown on Mars; what's next in NASA's Perseverance mission?

Fox News 20 April, 2021 - 02:44pm

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'Gutfeld!' host is joined by Tyrus Murdoch, Katherine Timpf, Steve Hilton and Joe DeVito to discuss the latest space feat

Now that NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter has completed its first test flight on the red planet, members of the agency's Southern California-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory will prepare for the next stages of their mission.

Following Monday's historic event, the solar-powered rotorcraft will attempt up to four more flights during a period of fewer than 30 days. 

Over the next three Martian days -- also known as sols -- the helicopter's team will receive and analyze data and imagery from the first flight and devise a plan for the second experimental test, which is scheduled for no sooner than April 22. 

"If the helicopter survives the second flight test, the Ingenuity team will consider how best to expand the flight profile," NASA said in a Monday release.

Ingenuity will conduct up to five flights, assuming NASA continues to successfully clear potential hurdles, each with chances to record additional data for future use.

The Associated Press reported on Monday that the ambitious endeavor could lead the way to a fleet of Martian drones as well as assist helicopter navigation on Earth 

After Ingenuity is done, the Perseverance rover will resume its focus on surface operations. 

Before Ingenuity's flight, Perseverance drove to its Overlook site, where it documented the feat using its Mastcam-Z and Navcam imagers.

NASA's Perseverance Twitter account also wrote that it had been imaging some of the local rocks at the lookout point ahead of Ingenuity's liftoff.

Perseverance will still be used to communicate with the now fully autonomous Ingenuity throughout the process.

As NASA notes in its press releases, a primary objective for "Percy's" mission on Mars is astrobiology research that includes the search for ancient microbial life

As the rover characterizes Martian geology, it will collect and cache rock and sediment -- drilling core samples into rock targets of interest to the scientists.

In March, NASA announced that Perseverance's SuperCam instrument had selected two rock targets, "Yeehgo" and "Máaz," for study. 

In cooperation with NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), will send spacecraft to Mars to collect the cached samples -- stored in tubes and placed on a storage rack before set in the same area on Mars' surface -- and return them to Earth for analysis.

The rover may cache over 30 selected rock and "soil" samples before its task is complete.

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This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital Solutions. Legal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

NASA just flew a drone on Mars, probably annoying nearby Martians

The A.V. Club 20 April, 2021 - 02:43pm

But still. Martians don’t care about our species’ achievements among the stars. Or, if they do, it’s only to monitor our advancements to make sure we don’t get too cocky. Now that we’ll soon be zipping drones across the Martian landscape, it’s only a matter of time before the locals make their presence known.

So, ask yourselves, NASA: Was the sheer joy of witnessing a rare example humanity’s capability to innovate, work together, and explore the unknown worth it you? We sure hope so.

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