Exclusive-WHO estimates COVID-19 boosters needed yearly for most vulnerable

Health

Reuters 24 June, 2021 - 09:51am 56 views

The estimate is included in a report, which is to be discussed on Thursday at a board meeting of Gavi, a vaccine alliance that co-leads the WHO's COVID-19 vaccine programme COVAX. The forecast is subject to changes and is also paired with two other less likely scenarios.

Vaccine makers Moderna Inc (MRNA.O) and Pfizer Inc (PFE.N), with its German partner BioNTech (22UAy.DE), have been vocal in their view that the world will soon need booster shots to maintain high levels of immunity, but the evidence for this is still unclear.

The document shows that the WHO considers annual boosters for high-risk individuals as its "indicative" baseline scenario, and boosters every two years for the general population.

It does not say how these conclusions were reached, but shows that under the base scenario new variants would continue to emerge and vaccines would be regularly updated to meet these threats.

The U.N. agency declined to comment on the content of the internal document.

A spokesperson for Gavi said COVAX was planning to take a wide range of scenarios into consideration.

The document, which is dated June 8 and is still a "work in progress," also predicts under the base case that 12 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses will be produced globally next year.

That would be slightly higher than the forecast of 11 billion doses for this year cited by the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations (IFPMA), signalling that the U.N. agency does not expect a significant ramp-up of vaccine production in 2022.

The document predicts manufacturing problems, regulatory approval issues and "transition away from some technology platforms" as potential drags on supplies next year.

It does not signal which technologies could be phased out, but the European Union, which has reserved the world's largest volume of COVID-19 vaccines, has bet heavily on shots using messenger RNA (mRNA) technology, such as those by Pfizer and Moderna, and has forgone some purchases of viral vector vaccines from AstraZeneca Plc (AZN.L) and Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N).

The scenarios will be used to define the WHO's global vaccination strategy and the forecasts may change as new data emerges on the role of boosters and the duration of vaccine protection, Gavi says in another document, also seen by Reuters.

So far about 2.5 billion doses have been administered worldwide, mostly in rich countries where over half of the population has received at least one dose, whereas in many poorer countries less than 1% has been vaccinated, according to Gavi's estimates.

See graphic: COVID-19 global vaccination tracker: https://graphics.reuters.com/world-coronavirus-tracker-and-maps/vaccination-rollout-and-access/

This gap could widen next year under the WHO's most pessimistic forecast, as the need for annual boosters could once again push poorer nations to the back of the queue.

In its worst-case scenario, the U.N. agency says production would be 6 billion doses next year, due to stringent regulation for new shots and manufacturing issues with existing ones.

That could be compounded by the need for annual boosters for the entire world, and not just the most vulnerable, to combat variants and limited duration of protection.

In the more optimistic situation, all vaccines in the pipeline would get authorised and production capacity would ramp up to about 16 billion doses to meet demand. Vaccines would also be shared equitably across the world.

There would be no need for boosters as vaccines would show strong efficacy against variants and long protection.

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

The World Health Organization (WHO) forecasts that people most vulnerable to COVID-19, such as the elderly, will need to get an annual vaccine booster to be protected against variants, an internal document seen by Reuters shows.

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Organ donation: Robin Swann calls delays in legislation 'frustrating'

BBC News 24 June, 2021 - 03:08pm

His proposed bill would mean people automatically become donors, unless they specifically say otherwise.

However it needs approval from the executive before it can go to the assembly.

BBC News NI understands Mr Swann and the DUP will meet tonight in a bid to reach an agreement on the delayed bill.

Mr Swann has accused the DUP, which previously opposed a similar proposal, of blocking the bill.

Northern Ireland is the only part of the UK without a soft opt-out system, after the law in England changed last year.

Currently donation will only proceed in Northern Ireland if a person has given their express consent, usually by signing on to the NHS Organ Donor Register or by speaking to their family.

In the absence of this, the family is asked to make a decision on behalf of the patient.

The Department of Health drew up legislation and held a public consultation aimed at changing the law.

Mr Swann told BBC News NI he has tried a number of times in recent weeks to bring the bill to the executive, but it has not made it onto the agenda.

"This is the challenge I've put to the executive, I've now written twice to the first and deputy first ministers even looking at urgent procedure to get this to the next stage," he said.

He raised the matter again at Thursday's executive meetingand said if the bill did not get approval soon, it had no chance of becoming law before the scheduled end of the Northern Ireland Assembly's mandate next May.

"It is frustrating for me as a minister, this issue was first brought to the assembly in 2016," he added.

"If it does meet objection and we have to change parts of it, I'd rather have that conversation in the assembly chamber where we can do it openly, democratically and where everyone's concerns can be raised publicly."

All the main executive parties apart from the DUP have said they support the minister's bill.

Mr Swann said it appeared to him the DUP was opposed to the law changing as a "point of principle".

A similar piece of legislation to introduce an opt-out system was tabled in 2016, but rejected by the Stormont health committee.

At that time, some of Northern Ireland's most senior clinicians warned that Northern Ireland was not ready for such a system and described that bill as unhelpful.

Sinn Féin MLA Colm Gildernew said the health minister must "act urgently" if legislation is to progress and be completed in this mandate.

The chair of the health committee said "these are very important pieces of law which will significantly impact the lives of so many of our constituents".

Mr Swann's bill is not the only piece of legislation that has faced delay due to disagreement in the executive.

Earlier this week, Justice Minister Naomi Long said her proposals to tackle upskirting and strengthen protections for victims of sexual abuse were being blocked.

She said the DUP had opposed her bill as it was too wide-ranging.

However Thursday's executive meeting saw ministers agree to allow it to be introduced before the assembly's summer break, after Ms Long agreed to make some changes to the bill.

She criticised the DUP for what she said was its "reckless disregard for some of the most vulnerable victims and witnesses in the justice system".

"The DUP's conduct in respect of this bill has been both unacceptable and unsustainable in a five party coalition; however, I could not in good conscience, allow 75% of the bill content which included vital legislation to protect victims of serious sexual offences, child sexual exploitation and human trafficking, to be lost.

The 12-storey residential complex in Florida came down overnight, with one person confirmed dead.

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Tucker Carlson: The COVID vaccine is dangerous for kids, Big Tech doesn't want you to know that

Fox News 24 June, 2021 - 03:01pm

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital Solutions. Legal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

'Tucker Carlson Tonight' host discusses new data showing potential vaccine risks

Since the beginning of the pandemic, key pieces of medical guidance from the World Health Organization have proven to be disastrously false — false enough to cost lives. It was the WHO, you’ll remember, that told us COVID couldn’t be transmitted between people, even as the virus was spreading into the United States. It was the WHO that worked in stealth with the Chinese government to obscure the source of the outbreak at the beginning, and then hide its origins from the world. We’re not attacking the WHO. Those are statements of fact. You’d think. they’d be disqualifying. Just the opposite. For more than a year, the tech monopolies of Silicon Valley have used the World Health Organization’s official statements to determine what American news consumers are allowed to know — and what they should be prohibited from knowing — about COVID. Facebook even announced a formal partnership with the WHO to "bring up to date and accurate information to billions of people." 

That partnership — between a China-controlled NGO, and the China-beholden tech platforms — continued smoothly until just a few days ago. That’s when bureaucrats at the WHO published new vaccine guidance. Here’s what it says: children should not take the coronavirus vaccine. Why? The drugs are too dangerous. There's not nearly enough data to understand the long-term effects or to show that the benefits are worth the risk that they bring. This is terrible news, of course, for the pharmaceutical industry. Big Pharma has been planning to test the vaccine on six-month-olds. It’s deeply embarrassing for much of the news media, which have taken a break from ginning up hysteria about Russian spies to sell vaccines to their viewers. And above all, it is a shocking repudiation of the American health establishment, which has been relentlessly pushing universal vaccination, including for children. Biden's top coronavirus adviser, Zeke Emanuel, declared that young people should be required to get the shot.

Wait a second, Zeke Emanual, if you’ve been vaccinated, why would you worry about why the people around you have been vaccinated if vaccines work? Kind of an obvious question, no one has ever asked it. Someone should. 

But they may not have a chance, because the WHO's latest finding -- that the vaccine is not safe for children -- threatens everything that reckless creeps like Zeke Emanuel and the pharmaceutical industry have been working for. More vaccines, no matter what the human cost. That is their position. In the end, the forces of recklessness appear to have more power even than the WHO. Here’s how we know: In a remarkable about-face, Silicon Valley has decided that the World Health Organization is, in fact, not reliable, it’s a disseminator of disinformation.  

Facebook has just censored a woman called Michelle Coriaty-Herbst for sharing the WHO's bulletin on vaccines word-for-word. She just posted it. Facebook deleted it. "Your comment goes against our community standards on spam," Facebook wrote. So, this is Silicon Valley’s new policy: everything about vaccines is good. Period. You are not allowed to suggest otherwise. No matter what data you might have. No matter what data you might have, no matter what a health organization might tell you.  

An epidemiology Ph.D. called Tracey Hoeg learned this recently. She posted slides from the CDC's own website showing that rates of myocarditis -- a potentially fatal heart inflammation -- are extremely high in young people who have taken the vaccine. That's not in dispute anymore; the CDC's preliminary investigation has just confirmed a link between the vaccine and myocarditis. 

As Hoeg put it, "We are standing on shaky ground if we say the risk to otherwise healthy kids from COVID-19 is higher than it is from the vaccine." She wrote that on Twitter. That’s true. Twitter censored her.  But why? It makes you wonder: why is that the one forbidden thing? 

And, while we’re at it, what are the risks from the vaccines? All medicines come with risks, so what’s the real answer? Two medical school professors -- UCLA's Joseph Ladapo and Yale's Harvey Risch -- recently tried to find out. They outlined what they found in The Wall Street Journal. They discovered that the VAERS system, the biggest database of self-reported vaccine harm we have, isn't just showing elevated rates of myocarditis. It's also showing much higher rates of other, very serious complications -- low platelets, deep-vein thrombosis, and death. Many deaths.

"The implication," they concluded, "is that the risks of a COVID -19 vaccine may outweigh the benefits for certain low-risk populations, such as children, young adults and people who have recovered from COVID-19." 

That's what the data show. Clearly. But instead of listening to the data, many schools and countless employers are mandating that everyone take the shot -- even if they've already had COVID and recovered. People who do not need the shot. Why are they doing this? It’s lunacy. Well, presumably because people like Tony Fauci told them the vaccine is more effective than natural immunity. Is that true? No. It is not true. There are no data to support that claim. But Fauci says it anyway.  

FAUCI: We know that reinfections with a homologous strain, namely the same strain as initial infection, remain rare. They occur, but they’re rare. Vaccination in people previously infected significantly boosts the immune response and likely, as I’m going to show you in a moment, providing better protection against certain variants. And then the issue of vaccines actually, at least with regard to SARS-CoV-2, can do better than nature. 

College students, young adults in the prime of their life, are being forced to take the vaccine because Tony Fauci said that, even though they don't need it, and in some cases, don’t want it. What will the effects on them be? Well, judging by the VAERS reporting system, we can be certain that some will be harmed. Beyond that, we can't be sure. We aren't even sure what effects this vaccine will have on the elderly -- the one group we were told from day one should take the vaccine as quickly as possible.  And most of us believed that.

But new numbers are coming. The Norwegian Medicines Agency has found that the vaccine may increase the risk of death in the elderly, as well. The Norwegian study conducted a study of 100 nursing home residents who died after receiving Pfizer's coronavirus shot. They found that at least 10 of the deaths were "likely caused" by the vaccine. 10%. And in 26 other cases, they were "possibly caused" by the vaccine.

What explains those numbers? Doctor Robert Malone tried to address that question recently in a podcast broadcast on YouTube.  YouTube took it down. They did that even though Doctor Robert Malone may be the most qualified person on the planet to discuss the subject. He helped create the mRNA technology behind the COVID vaccines. 

 This article is adapted from Tucker Carlson's opening commentary on the June 23, 2021, edition of "Tucker Carlson Tonight."

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Vaccine ‘passports’ to be introduced in Northern Ireland from next month

Armagh i 24 June, 2021 - 03:01pm

A vaccine ‘international certification scheme’ will go live in Northern Ireland by – or before – July 19, the Department of Health has announced.

Work is focussed on delivering the scheme ahead of that date – potentially as early as July 5 – and should be possible providing cyber security checks are cleared successfully.

Ensuring this is delivered by July 19 at the latest will provide alignment with neighbours in the Irish Republic.

Vaccine certification processes are currently being developed by UK and EU authorities.

The Department’s Chief Digital Information Officer Dan West said: “The aim is effectively to have a Covid-19 vaccine passport – internationally recognised proof a person has had both vaccine doses.

“This will complement the UK’s existing traffic light system for international travel, which can include PCR tests and quarantine rules, depending on the travel location.

“While final decisions have still to be taken on how and when these vaccine certificates will be used, they are expected to make foreign travel easier for people who have had both doses.

“Governments and businesses may also decide to use them in other circumstances, such as access to events and activities. Such decisions have still to be made here in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.”

Mr West added: “A lot of hard work is ongoing to deliver Northern Ireland’s scheme. Unlike other jurisdictions, we have not had the advantage of a pre-existing health service app. We are therefore building our system from scratch.

“We also want to make sure that rigorous cyber security checks are completed to protect against hackers, reflecting how seriously we take the protection of personal data.

“Northern Ireland’s vaccine certificates will in the first instance be in specialised hard copy format. These will feature security and counterfeit protection features and a specialised printing process will be required.

“A digital alternative to the hardcopy format will be available by mid-August. This will also support evidencing of negative PCR Covid tests, as an alternative to proof of vaccination. The process of applying for and receiving hard copy certification is expected to take 10 days.

“GPs, vaccination centres, the Department of Health and other parts of the health service cannot produce proof of vaccine to the required standard for travel purposes. So please don’t contact them asking for such paperwork.”

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Coronavirus: Latest from around world - Friday, June 25

Newshub 24 June, 2021 - 03:01pm

Watch: The next few days will be crucial in determining whether Wellington is out of the COVID-19 woods. Credits: Video - Newshub; Image - Getty.

The World Health Organization (WHO) forecasts that people most vulnerable to COVID-19, such as the elderly, will need to get an annual vaccine booster to be protected against variants, an internal document seen by Reuters shows.

According to Worldometers, 180.6 million people have had COVID-19 and 3.91 million have died.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson hinted that the UK was close to permitting unrestricted travel abroad for fully vaccinated people.

Japanese Emperor Naruhito "appears concerned" about the possibility the Olympic Games could cause the coronavirus to spread as feared by many members of the public, the head of the Imperial Household Agency said.

Thailand's food and drug administration announced it had approved the Pfizer/BioNTech  vaccine for emergency use.

Indonesia recorded its biggest daily increase in cases with 20,574 infections, taking its total to 2,053,995, according to the health ministry.

Mexico will donate over 400,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses on Thursday to the so-called Northern Triangle Central American nations of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, the Mexican foreign ministry said.

Africa is not winning its fight against the pandemic as a third wave sweeps the continent and countries struggle to obtain enough vaccines for their populations, Africa CDC director John Nkengasong said.

Afrigen Biologics expects a decision in mid-July on partners to produce Africa's first COVID-19 vaccine using the mRNA platform, the South African start-up's managing director said.

Tunisia is seeing a significant increase in cases, with intensive care wards almost full, an adviser to the government said.

Egypt will allow travellers who have taken full doses of approved vaccines to enter without taking a PCR test, the health ministry said.

Researchers at Oxford University said they have developed a method to predict the efficacy of new COVID-19 vaccines based on a blood test, potentially offering a short-cut around massive clinical trials that are increasingly difficult to conduct.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday it plans to move quickly to add a warning about rare cases of heart inflammation in adolescents and young adults to fact sheets for the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines.

British researchers have identified the level of antibody protection needed to prevent symptomatic COVID-19, the University of Oxford said, adding that results from the study could help speed up new vaccine development.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is highly effective against the Delta variant, a Pfizer official in Israel said.

Global shares edged up on Thursday, while the U.S. dollar slipped further below two-month highs as investors reassessed U.S. Federal Reserve statements on inflation and looked to upcoming data for direction.

The U.S. economy is rebounding rapidly from last year's decline, but much improvement is needed in the labor market, two Federal Reserve officials said.

The Bank of England said inflation would surpass 3% as Britain's locked-down economy reopens, but the climb further above its 2% target would only be "temporary" and most policymakers favoured keeping stimulus at full throttle.

German business morale rose by more than expected in June and hit its highest level since November 2018 on companies' surging optimism about the second half of the year in Europe's largest economy, a survey showed.

Northern Ireland Covid-19 vaccine passport certificate scheme to go live in July

Belfast Telegraph 24 June, 2021 - 12:08pm

Vaccine passports in Northern Ireland set to be issued in July

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The Department of Health has announced an internationally recognised vaccine passport scheme is to go live in Northern Ireland on or before July 19.

The department said the plan was to have the Covid-19 vaccine passport as a method of recognising proof a person has had both vaccine doses.

They said it could be delivered as early as July 5, with the July 19 date providing alignment with the Republic of Ireland.

Digital Covid-19 passports are due to launch in the European Union next month, while the rest of the UK is also expected to launch a similar scheme.

The Department said the certificate will “in the first instance” be a hard copy format, with “counterfeit protection” with a specialised printing process required.

A digital alternative to the hardcopy format will be available by mid-August. This will also support evidencing of negative PCR Covid tests, as an alternative to proof of vaccination, according to the Department of Health.

The Department of Health’s Chief Digital Information Officer Dan West said: “The aim is effectively to have a Covid-19 vaccine passport – internationally recognised proof a person has had both vaccine doses.

“This will complement the UK’s existing traffic light system for international travel, which can include PCR tests and quarantine rules, depending on the travel location.

“While final decisions have still to be taken on how and when these vaccine certificates will be used, they are expected to make foreign travel easier for people who have had both doses.

“Governments and businesses may also decide to use them in other circumstances, such as access to events and activities. Such decisions have still to be made here in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.”

Mr West added: “A lot of hard work is ongoing to deliver Northern Ireland’s scheme. Unlike other jurisdictions, we have not had the advantage of a pre-existing health service app. We are therefore building our system from scratch.

“We also want to make sure that rigorous cyber security checks are completed to protect against hackers, reflecting how seriously we take the protection of personal data.”

The Department reminded people that GPs, vaccination centres, and other parts of the health service cannot produce proof of vaccine to the required standard for travel purposes and have reminded people not to contact them requesting such a service.

Swann publishes recovery plan for cancer services after Covid

Belfast Telegraph 24 June, 2021 - 05:33am

Health Minister Robin Swann (Niall Carson/PA)

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Health Minister Robin Swann has unveiled a recovery plan to rebuild cancer services in Northern Ireland following the Covid pandemic.

The initiative comes as new statistics reveal that more than half of patients who received urgent cancer referrals from GPs in the first quarter of this year did not start treatment within the ministerial target of 62 days.

Mr Swann’s recovery plan sets out a series of short and medium term initiatives to enhance services affected by the pandemic.

These include ensuring all patients living with cancer have access to a clinical nurse specialist, appropriate psychological support, information and signposting to other services.

The plan also aims to increase screening capacity to address backlogs that have been created as a consequence of Covid, and to plan for the introduction of primary HPV testing into the cervical screening programme.

It also includes the delivery of a formal public awareness campaign encouraging people to consult their GP with signs and symptoms of cancer and new investment in cancer services, including in the fields of imaging, pathology, colposcopy and endoscopy.

The Health Minister said: “Similar to countries right across the world, the Covid-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on health and social care services in Northern Ireland.

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“Despite the best efforts of the HSC system and clinicians to protect the most important services, unfortunately it wasn’t always possible.

“Whilst there is still much work to do, good progress has already been made in some areas.

“We are now providing more breast screening sessions than we were before the pandemic, more CT sessions per week have been commissioned and we are constantly better utilising surgical and diagnostic capacity right across the system.

“It must be recognised, however, that Northern Ireland had significant and entirely unacceptable waiting times and deeply embedded workforce challenges long before the pandemic.

“Services have increasingly struggled to keep up with growing demand for cancer care.”

Mr Swann added: “This report states that £108 million of additional investment will be required to deliver its measures.

“There are some overlaps with the funding that has been identified as necessary to implement the Elective Care Framework.”

Published by the minister last week, the Elective Care Framework spells out proposals to deal with hospital waiting lists, including waiting times for cancer treatment.

The Department of Health also published its latest cancer waiting time statistics on Thursday.

Less than half of patients who had received an urgent referral for suspect cancer in NI in the first quarter of 2021 received hospital treatment within 62 days (PA)

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The ministerial target is that 95% of patients urgently referred with a suspect cancer should begin their treatment within 62 days.

The statistics show that only 47% of the 1,179 patients who received an urgent GP referral for suspect cancer in January to March this year received hospital treatment within 62 days.

Cancer Research UK’s public affairs manager in Northern Ireland, Margaret Carr, said: “It’s clear from these statistics that cancer services in Northern Ireland continue to struggle and a huge effort is still needed to clear a backlog of patients waiting.

“It’s essential that urgent action is now taken by the Northern Ireland Executive to secure funding and get this work underway.

“New equipment, better ways of working and more staff to tackle long standing workforce shortages must be at the heart of these reforms which will need sufficient investment.”

Get quick and easy access to the latest Northern Ireland news, sport, business and opinion with the Belfast Telegraph App.

Covid-19: NI records 188 cases, no more deaths

BBC News 23 June, 2021 - 12:27pm

No coronavirus-related deaths were recorded within the 24-hour reporting period up to Wednesday morning.

The total number of deaths linked to Covid-19 in Northern Ireland since the start of the pandemic is 2,155.

Another 188 people have tested positive for coronavirus.

That means a total of 125,272 people in Northern Ireland have had a confirmed diagnosis since the pandemic began.

Seventeen people are being treated for Covid-19 in hospital, an increase of four since Tuesday, but none are in intensive care units.

Three care homes are dealing with outbreaks of coronavirus.

A total of 1,971,061 Covid-19 vaccines have been administered.

No coronavirus-related deaths were recorded in the Republic of Ireland on Wednesday.

The total number of deaths linked to Covid-19 in the Republic of Ireland since the start of the pandemic is 4,979.

Another 384 people have tested positive for coronavirus.

There are 41 patients with Covid-19 being treated in hospitals - 13 of those people are being treated in intensive care units.

Vaccination statistics in the Republic of Ireland have been disrupted due to the cyber attack on the IT system used by the country's health service.

As of 16 June, 3.45 million Covid-19 vaccine doses had been administered.

The Irish health service chief clinical officer Dr Colm Henry said 61% of adults were partially vaccinated and 31% of adults were fully vaccinated.

The 12-storey residential complex in Florida came down overnight, with one person confirmed dead.

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Covid-19: Vaccine reaction listed as underlying cause for one NI death

BBC News 23 June, 2021 - 12:19pm

The government statistics agency Nisra said the death was registered during the first quarter of 2021.

The person who died was a man aged over 90 in the Northern Trust area. No further details are known.

The Department of Health, which runs the vaccination programme, said it could not discuss individual cases.

In March 2021, the World Health Organisation (WHO) created new additional codes for the classification of deaths, covering Covid-19 effects and adverse effects caused by vaccines.

The Northern Ireland Registrar General Quarterly report, published by Nisra, shows that of the 2,916 death certificates in which Covid-19 is mentioned anywhere up to 31 March 2021, one includes the new code for "Covid-19 vaccines causing adverse effects in therapeutic use, unspecified".

Almost two million vaccine doses have been administered in Northern Ireland, roughly evenly split between the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines.

Suspected adverse reactions (ADRs) are recorded through the Yellow Card scheme in the UK, operated by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

It has said that the "overwhelming majority" of reports concern reactions at the injection site, like a sore arm, and generalised symptoms such as "flu-like" illness, headache, chills, fatigue, feeling sick, fever, and rapid heartbeat.

There has been a small number of reports worldwide of people developing clots after a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, an occurrence that is described as "extremely rare".

There have been no reports of clots after getting a second dose.

Of the 2,354 ADRs for the AstraZeneca vaccine recorded in Northern Ireland up to 9 June 2021, nine have been unusual blood clots with low platelet levels.

There were 1,554 ADRs reported for the Pfizer vaccine.

The 12-storey residential complex in Florida came down overnight, with one person confirmed dead.

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