Extra Extra: The Rolling Stones' Steadfast, Brilliant Drummer Charlie Watts Has Died

Entertainment

Gothamist 24 August, 2021 - 04:17pm 41 views

How old was Charlie Watts?

He was 80 years old. Mr. Watts died at a London hospital on Tuesday surrounded by his family, his spokesperson said in a statement. “Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also as a member of The Rolling Stones one of the greatest drummers of his generation,” the statement said. The Wall Street JournalCharlie Watts, Rolling Stones Drummer, Dies at Age 80

How did Charlie Watts die?

Watts was an acclaimed jazz bandleader when he was stricken with throat cancer in 2004. He received extensive treatment and made a full recovery. His return to health allowed him to resume touring with both the Stones and his jazz band. Associated PressDrummer Charlie Watts, Rolling Stones backbone, dies at 80

Did Charlie Watts of the Rolling Stones died?

LONDON, Aug 24 (Reuters) - Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, widely regarded as one of the coolest men in rock, a jazz enthusiast and a snappy dresser, died on Tuesday just three weeks after pulling out of the band's upcoming U.S. tour for health reasons. He was 80 years old. ReutersRolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts dies after tour pull out

Which Rolling Stone member died?

Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, who helped them become one of the greatest bands in rock 'n' roll, has died at the age of 80. "It is with immense sadness that we announce the death of our beloved Charlie Watts," a statement said. bbc.comCharlie Watts: Rolling Stones drummer dies at 80

Last modified on Tue 24 Aug 2021 17.26 EDT

Hundreds of aged care homes are lagging behind in their efforts to vaccinate workers against Covid. Some centres have vaccinated fewer than 10% of their staff with a single dose, three weeks before a vaccine mandate for the sector is in force. Just one in five of aged care homes have vaccinated more than 90% of their workers with at least one dose, according to federal health department data. At the other end of the age spectrum, parents of children eligible for the vaccine say it has been almost impossible to make an appointment. The mother of a 14-year-old with Down’s syndrome was forced to turn to Twitter to find a vaccine appointment for her daughter. In a new Guardian Australia series, people in a range of circumstances tell us what life in the pandemic is like for them. Today, we hear from a healthcare worker and a school leader.

Charlie Watts, the Rolling Stones’ drummer, has died aged 80. His publicist said he died peacefully in a London hospital surrounded by his family. “Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also, as a member of the Rolling Stones, one of the greatest drummers of his generation,” he said. Earlier this month, it was announced that Watts was to miss the band’s forthcoming US tour as he recovered from an unspecified medical procedure. We take a look back at the music legend’s life in pictures here.

For-profit superannuation funds may be able to escape having to inform members of their historically poor performance after a last-minute change to benchmarks.

School students from kindergarten to year 2 as well as year 11 are expected to be prioritised under NSW’s roadmap to return some children to classrooms, but progress could depend on vaccination levels.

The Covid pandemic and remote learning appears to have had no significant impact on literacy and numeracy test results according to Naplan data, but concerns remain about the impact on some demographics.

An estimated $84m in music industry revenue has been lost due to border closures and Covid restrictions in the past two months alone. Some musicians are finding work outside of the industry, leading to fears there could be a talent drain on the horizon.

Police are investigating a suspected attempted poisoning at a German university after several people experience nausea and some saw their limbs turn blue after using campus kitchens.

A woman filmed rising floodwaters in Tennessee seconds before she was swept to her death.

Blue whales are returning to Spain’s Atlantic coast after an absence of more than 40 years, where they were nearly hunted to extinction.

As restrictions on movement intensify due to Covid-19, the lure of country life is ever strengthening. Lockdowns present a poignant time for those of us who are city bound to imagine a tree change from the comfort of the couch, but, if you really want to understand rural life in Australia, Australia’s Food Bowl is a great place to start. Hosted by charismatic and committed Mildura restaurateur Stefano de Pieri, the foodie documentary series is lush with bountiful fresh food, hard-working people, the pleasures of eating; yet food production and community life are shown to be reliant on ecosystems that are under extreme pressure. The river system is in strife.

When Dr Michael Krasovitsky told his patient Stephanie* that it would be best to maximise the quality of the time that she had left after failed cancer treatments, the pair got excited about her bucket list. And then, overnight, Sydney went into lockdown. “Stephanie’s death preparations had changed. She would not be ticking things off her bucket list, as she had planned. But there was something comforting about this new version of dying. Indeed, rather than spending time on new experiences, on new adventures, on a bucket list of events to tick off, it would be the closeness of family and friends that would sustain her. She found the precious closeness of connection, of loved ones, to be the true meaning of life before death,” Krasovitsky said.

Sorry your browser does not support audio - but you can download here and listen https://audio.guim.co.uk/2020/05/05-61553-gnl.fw.200505.jf.ch7DW.mp3

In early July, a month and a half before the Paralympics, Jannik Blair was having wheelchair problems. A seasoned member of the Rollers, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team going for gold in the Tokyo Paralympics, Blair had too many chairs. “It’s hard enough to travel with one chair, let alone two, let alone three,” he says.

An athlete has tested positive for Covid-19 in the Paralympic village for the first time, and nine other new cases had also been detected among workers at the Games outside the village.

And take a look at the best images from the Tokyo Paralympics opening ceremony.

Sydney’s Westmead Hospital, at the epicentre of Sydney’s Covid outbreak, has been forced into “emergency operations” as it deals with an increasing number of Covid patients, reports the Sydney Morning Herald. Rio Tinto is the latest mining giant hit by the sexual assault crisis in WA’s resources sector, according to the West Australian, with police investigating the alleged rape of a female worker. And the Australian has a story about Beijing freezing out Australian universities looking to run joint courses with Chinese universities.

A coronial inquiry into the Black Summer bushfires examining how 25 people lost their lives opens in Sydney.

If you would like to receive the Guardian Australia morning mail to your email inbox every weekday, sign up here.

If you have any questions or comments about any of our newsletters please email newsletters@theguardian.com.

Read full article at Gothamist

Inside Charlie Watts’ 57-Year Marriage: Meet the Late Rolling Stones Drummer’s Beloved Wife Shirley

Closer Weekly 24 August, 2021 - 06:40pm

In a band that defined debauched rock ’n’ roll, he was a quiet, dapper jazz fan. But their unusual chemistry defined the rhythm of the Stones, and of rock.

On some superficial level, Charlie Watts had always seemed the oddest Rolling Stone, the one who never quite fit as a member of rock’s most Dionysian force.

While his bandmates cultivated an attitude of debauched insouciance, Watts, the band’s drummer since 1963, kept a quiet, even glum, public persona. He avoided the limelight, wore bespoke suits from Savile Row tailors and remained married to the same woman for more than 50 years.

Watts even seemed barely interested in rock ’n’ roll itself. He claimed that it had little influence on him, preferring — and long championing — the jazz heritage of Charlie Parker, Buddy Rich and Max Roach. “I never liked Elvis until I met Keith Richards,” Watts told Mojo, a British music magazine, in 1994. “The only rock ’n’ roll player I ever liked when I was young was Fats Domino.”

Even the Stones’ celebrated longevity represented less of a life’s mission to Watts than a tedious job punctuated by brief moments of excitement. In the 1989 documentary “25x5: The Continuing Adventures of the Rolling Stones,” he summed up what was then a quarter-century on the clock with one of the world’s greatest rock ’n’ roll bands: “Work five years, and 20 years hanging around.”

And yet Watts, who died on Tuesday at 80 as the Stones’ longest-serving member outside of Richards and Mick Jagger, was a vital part of the band’s sound, with a rhythmic approach that was as much a part of the Stones’ musical fingerprint as Richards’s sharp-edged guitar or Jagger’s sneering vocals.

“To me, Charlie Watts was the secret essence of the whole thing,” Richards wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Life.”

Watts’s backbeat gave early hits like “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” a steady testosterone drive, and later tracks like “Tumbling Dice” and “Beast of Burden” a languid strut.

His distinctive drumming style — playing with a minimum of motion, often slightly behind the beat — gave the group’s sound a barely perceptible but inimitable rhythmic drag. Bill Wyman, the Stones’ longtime bassist, described that as a byproduct of the group’s unusual chemistry. While in most rock bands the guitarist follows the lead of the drummer, the Stones flipped that relationship — Richards, the guitarist, led the attack, with Watts (and all others) following along.

“It’s probably a matter of personality,” Wyman was quoted as saying in Victor Bockris’s book “Keith Richards: The Biography.” “Keith is a very confident and stubborn player. Immediately you’ve got something like a hundredth-of-a-second delay between the guitar and Charlie’s lovely drumming, and that will change the sound completely. That’s why people find it hard to copy us.”

Watts’s technique involved idiosyncratic use of the hi-hat, the sandwiched cymbals that rock drummers usually whomp with metronomic regularity. Watts tended to pull his right hand away on the upbeat, giving his left a clear path to the snare drum — lending the beat a strong but slightly off-kilter momentum.

Even Watts was not sure where he picked up that quirk. He may have gotten it from his friend Jim Keltner, one of rock’s most well-traveled studio drummers. But the move became a Watts signature, and musicians marveled at his hi-hat choreography. “It’ll give you a heart arrhythmia if you look at it,” Richards wrote.

To Watts, it was just an efficient way to land a hard hit on the snare.

“I was never conscious I did it,” he said in a 2018 video interview. “I think the reason I did it is to get the hand out of the way to do a bigger backbeat.”

Watts’s musical style could be traced to mid-1950s London, the period just before rock took hold among the postwar generation that would dominate pop music a decade later. As a young man he was infatuated with jazz, often jamming with a bass-playing neighbor, Dave Green. In 1962, after stints in local jazz bands, he joined the guitarist Alexis Korner’s group Blues Incorporated, which was influenced by electric Chicago blues and R&B.

“I went into rhythm and blues,” Watts recalled in a 2012 interview in The New Yorker. “When they asked me to play, I didn’t know what it was. I thought it meant Charlie Parker, played slow.”

While Watts was in Blues Incorporated, Jagger, Richards and Brian Jones — the other founding guitar player of the Rolling Stones — all passed through, playing with the group. Watts joined the Stones at the start of 1963, and that June the band released its first single, a cover of Chuck Berry’s “Come On.”

The Stones quickly took their place as leaders in rock’s British Invasion, the rowdy complement to the Beatles. But Watts never quite matched that profile. On the band’s early tours of the United States, he behaved like a middle-aged tourist, making pilgrimages to jazz clubs.

As the lifestyle of the Rolling Stones became more extravagant, Watts grew more solitary and eccentric. He became an expert in Georgian silver; he collected vintage cars but never learned to drive. The journalist Stanley Booth, in his book “The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones,” about the glory and the depravity of the band’s 1969 American tour, described Watts as “the world’s politest man.”

At the same time, Watts often functioned as a kind of ironic mascot for the band. He was a focal point on the covers of “Between the Buttons” (1967) and “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!” (1970), on which a smiling, leaping Watts posed with a donkey.

When members of the Stones relocated to France in 1971 to escape onerous British tax rates, Richards’s rented villa in Villefranche-sur-Mer became the band’s hub of creativity and decadence. Watts and Wyman largely abstained, and as a result were absent for some of the ad hoc recording sessions that resulted in the band’s next album, “Exile on Main St.”

“They weren’t very debauched for me,” Watts later said of the sessions. “I mean, I lived with Keith, but I used to sit and play and then I’d go to bed.”

While around the Rolling Stones, he was invariably laconic, usually lingering in the background during public appearances. But later in life, as Watts indulged his love for jazz in the long stretches between Stones projects — his groups included Charlie Watts Orchestra and two with Green, the Charlie Watts Quintet and the ABC&D of Boogie Woogie — he opened up, giving occasional interviews.

His go-to subjects were his love of jazz and how strange it was to be a member of the Rolling Stones.

“I used to play with loads of bands, and the Stones were just another one,” he told The Observer, a British newspaper, in 2000. “I thought they’d last three months, then a year, then three years, then I stopped counting.”

Morning mail: Kabul airport despair, Rolling Stones drummer dead, Patty Mills’ Olympic journey

The Guardian Australia 24 August, 2021 - 03:48pm

Last modified on Tue 24 Aug 2021 17.26 EDT

Hundreds of aged care homes are lagging behind in their efforts to vaccinate workers against Covid. Some centres have vaccinated fewer than 10% of their staff with a single dose, three weeks before a vaccine mandate for the sector is in force. Just one in five of aged care homes have vaccinated more than 90% of their workers with at least one dose, according to federal health department data. At the other end of the age spectrum, parents of children eligible for the vaccine say it has been almost impossible to make an appointment. The mother of a 14-year-old with Down’s syndrome was forced to turn to Twitter to find a vaccine appointment for her daughter. In a new Guardian Australia series, people in a range of circumstances tell us what life in the pandemic is like for them. Today, we hear from a healthcare worker and a school leader.

Charlie Watts, the Rolling Stones’ drummer, has died aged 80. His publicist said he died peacefully in a London hospital surrounded by his family. “Charlie was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and also, as a member of the Rolling Stones, one of the greatest drummers of his generation,” he said. Earlier this month, it was announced that Watts was to miss the band’s forthcoming US tour as he recovered from an unspecified medical procedure. We take a look back at the music legend’s life in pictures here.

For-profit superannuation funds may be able to escape having to inform members of their historically poor performance after a last-minute change to benchmarks.

School students from kindergarten to year 2 as well as year 11 are expected to be prioritised under NSW’s roadmap to return some children to classrooms, but progress could depend on vaccination levels.

The Covid pandemic and remote learning appears to have had no significant impact on literacy and numeracy test results according to Naplan data, but concerns remain about the impact on some demographics.

An estimated $84m in music industry revenue has been lost due to border closures and Covid restrictions in the past two months alone. Some musicians are finding work outside of the industry, leading to fears there could be a talent drain on the horizon.

Police are investigating a suspected attempted poisoning at a German university after several people experience nausea and some saw their limbs turn blue after using campus kitchens.

A woman filmed rising floodwaters in Tennessee seconds before she was swept to her death.

Blue whales are returning to Spain’s Atlantic coast after an absence of more than 40 years, where they were nearly hunted to extinction.

As restrictions on movement intensify due to Covid-19, the lure of country life is ever strengthening. Lockdowns present a poignant time for those of us who are city bound to imagine a tree change from the comfort of the couch, but, if you really want to understand rural life in Australia, Australia’s Food Bowl is a great place to start. Hosted by charismatic and committed Mildura restaurateur Stefano de Pieri, the foodie documentary series is lush with bountiful fresh food, hard-working people, the pleasures of eating; yet food production and community life are shown to be reliant on ecosystems that are under extreme pressure. The river system is in strife.

When Dr Michael Krasovitsky told his patient Stephanie* that it would be best to maximise the quality of the time that she had left after failed cancer treatments, the pair got excited about her bucket list. And then, overnight, Sydney went into lockdown. “Stephanie’s death preparations had changed. She would not be ticking things off her bucket list, as she had planned. But there was something comforting about this new version of dying. Indeed, rather than spending time on new experiences, on new adventures, on a bucket list of events to tick off, it would be the closeness of family and friends that would sustain her. She found the precious closeness of connection, of loved ones, to be the true meaning of life before death,” Krasovitsky said.

Sorry your browser does not support audio - but you can download here and listen https://audio.guim.co.uk/2020/05/05-61553-gnl.fw.200505.jf.ch7DW.mp3

In early July, a month and a half before the Paralympics, Jannik Blair was having wheelchair problems. A seasoned member of the Rollers, the Australian men’s wheelchair basketball team going for gold in the Tokyo Paralympics, Blair had too many chairs. “It’s hard enough to travel with one chair, let alone two, let alone three,” he says.

An athlete has tested positive for Covid-19 in the Paralympic village for the first time, and nine other new cases had also been detected among workers at the Games outside the village.

And take a look at the best images from the Tokyo Paralympics opening ceremony.

Sydney’s Westmead Hospital, at the epicentre of Sydney’s Covid outbreak, has been forced into “emergency operations” as it deals with an increasing number of Covid patients, reports the Sydney Morning Herald. Rio Tinto is the latest mining giant hit by the sexual assault crisis in WA’s resources sector, according to the West Australian, with police investigating the alleged rape of a female worker. And the Australian has a story about Beijing freezing out Australian universities looking to run joint courses with Chinese universities.

A coronial inquiry into the Black Summer bushfires examining how 25 people lost their lives opens in Sydney.

If you would like to receive the Guardian Australia morning mail to your email inbox every weekday, sign up here.

If you have any questions or comments about any of our newsletters please email newsletters@theguardian.com.

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