GAME DAY: US and Canada Square Off in Gold-Medal Game

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USA Hockey 31 August, 2021 - 07:45am 4 views

Who won the women's hockey game between USA and Canada?

Canada Wins 2021 Women's World Championship Over USA. Canada has won the women's World Hockey Championship with a 3-2 overtime win over the United States in Calgary. Sports IllustratedCanada Wins 2021 Women's World Championship Over USA

IIHF Women’s World Championship: Canada vs. U.S. gold medal game live updates, score, analysis, news and highlights

The Athletic 31 August, 2021 - 10:03pm

For the first time since the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, we have a Canada-U.S. gold medal game.

Canada enters the final of the IIHF Women’s World Championship a perfect 6-0, and looks like the favourite to win its first world championship since 2012. The Americans, 5-1 at the tournament, have played well too, and have the last five world titles on their side.

The last time these two teams played, in this tournament's preliminary round, Canada handily beat the U.S., 5-1. But expect this to be much closer — in the last nine gold medal game meetings (at Worlds and the Olympics), seven games have gone to overtime or a shootout, and only once has a gold medal been won by more than a one-goal margin.

The puck will drop at 7:30 p.m. ET, and The Athletic's Hailey Salvian and Sean Gentille will be here blogging the game until a gold medal is awarded.

Here's some pregame reading material to set the stage:

» Canada at the World Championship: Everything you need to know

» ‘We are better than what we showed’: U.S. finds no silver lining in loss to Canada at women’s worlds

» Takeaways from Canada’s stellar start at women’s worlds: Beating the U.S., dominant puck possession and more

» ‘She’s a special talent’: Meet Sarah Fillier, the future of women’s hockey in Canada

Mélodie Daoust, on what feels different from the 2019 Worlds to this one: “The gold medal!”

“We just want to keep going, because there’s another medal coming up pretty soon.”

Sarah Fillier — the future face of women’s hockey in Canada, according to plenty — dropped in with TSN.

On the timing of the goal: “It’s crazy. It’s so weird how it happened too, we were all on the bench saying, ‘Hey, we’ve got to go finish this next 11 minutes,’ but the buzzer went and we all jumped (on the ice), and it was so crazy but it’s so cool.”

On the call: “I think we all knew right away.”

On the experience: “It’s amazing. Being part of this program, being part of this team, it’s something that I’ve always dreamt of. We always focus on our win, I think that’s exactly what we did. So we’re all really happy with that.”

On her battles with Team USA's Brianna Decker: “I’ll take any role I can. If I can get in someone’s head, I’ll do that instead of getting on the scoresheet.”

Marie-Philip Poulin’s post-game interview with TSN did not get the beam treatment. Again, she was probably fine with that.

On where it ranks on her personal list of game-winning goals: “Pretty high, to be honest. It’s been a while. I think the emotions were pretty high. To be honest, being down 2-0 in the first, we just showed the resilient group that we have. It was a group effort. We killed many penalties and we stick together, we stick to the plan. It was great, to be honest.”

On the comeback: “We just stuck to our way the whole time. The whole tournament, from start to finish, we knew ... the U.S. had a great team, but we stuck to us, we focused on ourselves and we just came out on top.”

On the delayed goal call: “When the buzzer went off, I knew right away.”

The thing about sports — series, gold-medal games, whatever — is that they rarely live up to the hype. We can hope that things work out the way they’re supposed to, from a narrative standpoint, but it just doesn’t happen that often. So when it works out, some part of you should appreciate it.

It’s hard to argue that this player, scoring this goal, in this game doesn’t qualify. If you’re Canadian, you should savor it. If you’re American, you should at least respect it. There’s something to be said for meeting the moment. Marie-Philip Poulin has done it, and so has Team Canada.

The coolest part? We’re probably going to get a shot at seeing it again — or a new version, with a new player and a new shot — sometime soon.

The U.S. winning streak is over at five. Marie-Philip Poulin is handing out gold medals to Team Canada after Kendall Coyne Schofield speed-handed silver to her team. This is the first time Canada has won gold on home soil since 2007.

This is the best version of Team Canada we have seen in a while. Dominant in the offensive zone. Shutdown on defence, and steady goaltending.

Looking ahead to 2022 Olympics, Canada is the team to beat once again.

How do Canada and the U.S. always deliver in big games? That was an instant classic, 3v3 OT and all.

And Marie-Philip Poulin, a decade into her international career, already the owner of two Olympic gold-medal-winning goals, showed up again.

Here’s the all-tournament team, selected by media (including our Hailey Salvian):

Marie-Philip Poulin didn’t make it, but I’m guessing she’s OK with that.

Earlier in the game, I said “the Poulin line is lurking.” Not sure if that applies to three-on-three, but I’ll take what I can get, at this point.

What a perfect shot by Marie-Philip Poulin.

Nicole Hensley couldn’t do anything there. Poulin, doing what Canadian captains do in gold-medal games on home ice against the United States. I take no joy in reporting this.

Renata Fast, by my count, has blocked two shots in this 3v3 OT period. Just one reason she was on my All-Star team ballot.

Gentille: Three-on-three is terrible for blogging. Not conducive for making my lil’ posts. Too fast.

The IIHF made a rule change for three-on-three overtime in 2018, to start with the 2019 world championships. At the time, they cited not being able to risk long overtime games. There will be no shootout.

“There are various reasons we can’t risk a long overtime game in the final,” said IIHF Competition and Coordination Committee Chairman Franz Reindl. “Arena facilities have to turn over quickly, often on the same night as the final, to accommodate new events coming in. There are also concerns from broadcasting and team management that have to be considered as well.”

That makes sense in the preliminary rounds, but not the gold-medal game. It's 8 p.m. local time. Nobody is playing after this.

Gentille: It’s almost worse that they have different rules only for the gold-medal game ... but it’s just three-on-three without a shootout. Like, “We’ll change it a little because we know the shootout is bullshit, but also, we’re still not gonna play normal hockey.”

Canada has a 28-24 shot advantage. They’ll be shooting on the side that has seen all four goals.

Playing three-on-three for a gold medal is gross and wrong, but that’s another discussion for another day.

I’m not saying that if you go 0 for 85 on the power play that you deserve to lose — but if you go 0 for 85 and lose, you deserve it. That’s where the U.S. finds itself at the moment. A couple minutes left in the third. Do not check my math.

Salvian: Canada has killed off three penalties in this period alone. A lot of Team USA pressure, but Ann-Renee Desbiens has been really steady.

Hailey has texted me “POWER KILL” 15 times tonight already. She just did it again! Sixteen!

Feels like I haven’t talked about Jocelyn Larocque enough this tournament.

She’s played so many important minutes for Canada on the top pair, penalty kill and always against top competition.

She’s so steady in all situations (like we just saw on the doorstep on the PK before Decker’s penalty), and a real pillar on the back end for Canada.

First few minutes of the third kind of feel like overtime in a playoff game, when it’s less a matter of who scores and more a matter of when.

Maybe stuff settles down here, but I’m not sure the U.S. wants to trade chances with Canada. They’ve already asked Hensley to do a lot, and the Poulin line is lurking.

Alex Carpenter has both U.S. goals tonight and five in her last eight periods. Yep, that’s a beamin’.

On how she’s producing: “I think just seeing what has been working for our team and learning from my teammates and trying to mimic what they’ve been doing; getting to the dirty areas in front of the net and really using your body to put those pucks in the net.”

On what she expects in the third period: “I think it’s going to be an all-out battle. We knew after the first period that they were gonna come out flying and we were just trying to weather the storm there a little, but I think we’re gonna get back in the locker room, regroup and have a good push out there in the third.”

This is on NHL Network in the U.S., if you’re looking for it.

If these U.S. jerseys weren’t ugly as hell, I’d be in the market for a Nicole Hensley. It’s 2-2 after two, mainly because of her.

The Americans will start the third period on the power play.

I’ve alluded to this already: I don’t watch a ton of women’s hockey. I’m working on that. One of the things I’ve picked up on, though, from paying attention to folks who, uh pay more attention — the officiating can be rough. That cross-check call on Megan Bozek to put Canada on the power play … yep, that qualifies.

No harm, no foul — Kendall Coyne Schofeld used her speed to create a nice shorthanded chance for the U.S., Canada couldn’t capitalize on some chaos in front of Nicole Hensley, and Hensley made a nice save on Renata Fast. Still though, never should’ve happened.

The thing about Jamie Lee Rattray ... She’s a gritty player, good below the hash marks, can bring energy to any line and all that good “versatile, depth forward” stuff.

But she’s also a former national champion with Clarkson, a Patty Kaz winner (awarded to the top player in college) and has a ton of skill as displayed by her tip to tie the game a two.

Jamie Lee Rattray has the prettiest goal of the night so far. First of four that hasn’t been scored amidst some net-front chaos. This game is a blast.

Natalie Spooner! Beam! Beam up and discuss your 2-0 deficit!

On the chatter on the bench after giving up the first goal: “We knew they were gonna come out hard ... Obviously, we’ve been down in first periods before, so I think we’re still feeling good, just trying to stay all over them and get pucks to the net.”

“Having a good F3 allows our D to pinch and keep pucks in their end. ... When we have success is when we get our feet moving, and they were F1 race cars going right at their D and keeping them pinned in, so I think if we’re doing those things then we’re going to have a lot of success.”

“I think (Canada’s young players) have been awesome this whole tournament. I think we’ve been trying to keep it really light and really fun, and I think just keep going. Obviously, we have been in this scenario with this team before, and I think (we) just have confidence in that, that we believe in ourselves and know we can come back.”

This is the first bit of adversity Canada has faced since the opening game of the tournament, going down 2-0 to Finland in the first period. A game they ultimately won 5-3.

Score at the end of the first period is Alex Carpenter 2, An Entire Country of People 0.

Minor change from the preliminary-round game, when (if I remember correctly) Canada outshot the U.S. 43-2 after 20 minutes.

Both of the U.S. goals have come on the doorstep right in front of Desbiens. What made Canada so dominant throughout this tournament, and against Team USA in the prelims, was their ability to keep teams on the perimeter and limit such high danger opportunities against.

Down 2-0 here, they (clearly) need to get back to executing that game plan.

Here’s the GIF I’ve been waiting for; Abbey Murphy dropping Natalie Spooner right in front of the benches. Carpenter scored about a minute later. Coincidence, I’m sure.

Alex Carpenter has scored the opening goal for Team USA in three straight games now.

A much more even start in the gold-medal match at the first TV timeout. Around this time in the preliminary matchup between these two teams, Canada already had a 2-0 lead. Now, it's 0-0 and the shots on goal are only 3-1 in favour of Canada.

We all knew this would be a different game. Canada is 6-0 in this tournament for a reason, but the U.S. won the last five world championships for a reason too.

We’ve seen it before in gold-medal games; sometimes, if the host country is involved, there’s a little bit of early tightness. It’s human nature. The crowd might turn into a benefit, but there’s an adjustment period. That’s got to be less of a thing in Calgary, right? There aren’t any fans. Not really, at least. Families are there, and most of the other teams in the tournament are as well (according to a random person in the arena), but there’s less palpable tension.

That’s how it works. Sounds like an unfair advantage for Canada, if you ask me.

Nicole Hensley is starting in goal for the U.S., over Alex Cavallini, which is probably how it had to be.

The preliminary-round mess wasn’t nearly on Cavallini, but Hensley just shut out Finland. She’s given up one goal all tournament, albeit against Canada. Feels like a no-brainer.

The U.S. at the World Championship: Roster turnover, the quest for another title and everything you need to know

Eye for an eye, baby. The U.S. is winning this one 5-1. That’s how rivalries should work.

Nah, I think it’ll be closer than that. There’s no reason for me to pick Canada here, either.

I’d rather be wrong, but patriotic in my wrongness. So I’ll say 4-3, USA. Seven total goals in honor of the seventh straight U.S. gold — and zero goals for the Natalie-Sarah Fillier-Mèlodie Daoust line. I’m not picking them to do it until they do it.

‘We are better than what we showed’: U.S. finds no silver lining in loss to Canada at women’s worlds

As the resident Canadian of this blog, I must say this is a pretty easy year to bet on Canada winning this game.

They’re the No. 1 seeded team in the tournament for a reason. Canada is a perfect 6-0 and has been dominant in every game they’ve played, outshooting opponents 313-66. They have a lot of talent, but have shown they will do all the little things too: they’re strong on the forecheck, first on pucks, and love to make life difficult in any way for their opponents.

Anything can happen in a single game, and the U.S. has a recent history of winning these games, so I think it will be close. But I haven’t seen anything the last 10 days that can deter me from betting on a Canada win.

Takeaways from Canada’s 4-0 start at women’s worlds: Beating the U.S., dominant puck possession and more

IIHF Women’s World Championship: Canada vs. U.S. gold medal game live updates, score, analysis, news and highlights

Sporting News 31 August, 2021 - 10:03pm

For the first time since the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, we have a Canada-U.S. gold medal game.

Canada enters the final of the IIHF Women’s World Championship a perfect 6-0, and looks like the favourite to win its first world championship since 2012. The Americans, 5-1 at the tournament, have played well too, and have the last five world titles on their side.

The last time these two teams played, in this tournament's preliminary round, Canada handily beat the U.S., 5-1. But expect this to be much closer — in the last nine gold medal game meetings (at Worlds and the Olympics), seven games have gone to overtime or a shootout, and only once has a gold medal been won by more than a one-goal margin.

The puck will drop at 7:30 p.m. ET, and The Athletic's Hailey Salvian and Sean Gentille will be here blogging the game until a gold medal is awarded.

Here's some pregame reading material to set the stage:

» Canada at the World Championship: Everything you need to know

» ‘We are better than what we showed’: U.S. finds no silver lining in loss to Canada at women’s worlds

» Takeaways from Canada’s stellar start at women’s worlds: Beating the U.S., dominant puck possession and more

» ‘She’s a special talent’: Meet Sarah Fillier, the future of women’s hockey in Canada

Mélodie Daoust, on what feels different from the 2019 Worlds to this one: “The gold medal!”

“We just want to keep going, because there’s another medal coming up pretty soon.”

Sarah Fillier — the future face of women’s hockey in Canada, according to plenty — dropped in with TSN.

On the timing of the goal: “It’s crazy. It’s so weird how it happened too, we were all on the bench saying, ‘Hey, we’ve got to go finish this next 11 minutes,’ but the buzzer went and we all jumped (on the ice), and it was so crazy but it’s so cool.”

On the call: “I think we all knew right away.”

On the experience: “It’s amazing. Being part of this program, being part of this team, it’s something that I’ve always dreamt of. We always focus on our win, I think that’s exactly what we did. So we’re all really happy with that.”

On her battles with Team USA's Brianna Decker: “I’ll take any role I can. If I can get in someone’s head, I’ll do that instead of getting on the scoresheet.”

Marie-Philip Poulin’s post-game interview with TSN did not get the beam treatment. Again, she was probably fine with that.

On where it ranks on her personal list of game-winning goals: “Pretty high, to be honest. It’s been a while. I think the emotions were pretty high. To be honest, being down 2-0 in the first, we just showed the resilient group that we have. It was a group effort. We killed many penalties and we stick together, we stick to the plan. It was great, to be honest.”

On the comeback: “We just stuck to our way the whole time. The whole tournament, from start to finish, we knew ... the U.S. had a great team, but we stuck to us, we focused on ourselves and we just came out on top.”

On the delayed goal call: “When the buzzer went off, I knew right away.”

The thing about sports — series, gold-medal games, whatever — is that they rarely live up to the hype. We can hope that things work out the way they’re supposed to, from a narrative standpoint, but it just doesn’t happen that often. So when it works out, some part of you should appreciate it.

It’s hard to argue that this player, scoring this goal, in this game doesn’t qualify. If you’re Canadian, you should savor it. If you’re American, you should at least respect it. There’s something to be said for meeting the moment. Marie-Philip Poulin has done it, and so has Team Canada.

The coolest part? We’re probably going to get a shot at seeing it again — or a new version, with a new player and a new shot — sometime soon.

The U.S. winning streak is over at five. Marie-Philip Poulin is handing out gold medals to Team Canada after Kendall Coyne Schofield speed-handed silver to her team. This is the first time Canada has won gold on home soil since 2007.

This is the best version of Team Canada we have seen in a while. Dominant in the offensive zone. Shutdown on defence, and steady goaltending.

Looking ahead to 2022 Olympics, Canada is the team to beat once again.

How do Canada and the U.S. always deliver in big games? That was an instant classic, 3v3 OT and all.

And Marie-Philip Poulin, a decade into her international career, already the owner of two Olympic gold-medal-winning goals, showed up again.

Here’s the all-tournament team, selected by media (including our Hailey Salvian):

Marie-Philip Poulin didn’t make it, but I’m guessing she’s OK with that.

Earlier in the game, I said “the Poulin line is lurking.” Not sure if that applies to three-on-three, but I’ll take what I can get, at this point.

What a perfect shot by Marie-Philip Poulin.

Nicole Hensley couldn’t do anything there. Poulin, doing what Canadian captains do in gold-medal games on home ice against the United States. I take no joy in reporting this.

Renata Fast, by my count, has blocked two shots in this 3v3 OT period. Just one reason she was on my All-Star team ballot.

Gentille: Three-on-three is terrible for blogging. Not conducive for making my lil’ posts. Too fast.

The IIHF made a rule change for three-on-three overtime in 2018, to start with the 2019 world championships. At the time, they cited not being able to risk long overtime games. There will be no shootout.

“There are various reasons we can’t risk a long overtime game in the final,” said IIHF Competition and Coordination Committee Chairman Franz Reindl. “Arena facilities have to turn over quickly, often on the same night as the final, to accommodate new events coming in. There are also concerns from broadcasting and team management that have to be considered as well.”

That makes sense in the preliminary rounds, but not the gold-medal game. It's 8 p.m. local time. Nobody is playing after this.

Gentille: It’s almost worse that they have different rules only for the gold-medal game ... but it’s just three-on-three without a shootout. Like, “We’ll change it a little because we know the shootout is bullshit, but also, we’re still not gonna play normal hockey.”

Canada has a 28-24 shot advantage. They’ll be shooting on the side that has seen all four goals.

Playing three-on-three for a gold medal is gross and wrong, but that’s another discussion for another day.

I’m not saying that if you go 0 for 85 on the power play that you deserve to lose — but if you go 0 for 85 and lose, you deserve it. That’s where the U.S. finds itself at the moment. A couple minutes left in the third. Do not check my math.

Salvian: Canada has killed off three penalties in this period alone. A lot of Team USA pressure, but Ann-Renee Desbiens has been really steady.

Hailey has texted me “POWER KILL” 15 times tonight already. She just did it again! Sixteen!

Feels like I haven’t talked about Jocelyn Larocque enough this tournament.

She’s played so many important minutes for Canada on the top pair, penalty kill and always against top competition.

She’s so steady in all situations (like we just saw on the doorstep on the PK before Decker’s penalty), and a real pillar on the back end for Canada.

First few minutes of the third kind of feel like overtime in a playoff game, when it’s less a matter of who scores and more a matter of when.

Maybe stuff settles down here, but I’m not sure the U.S. wants to trade chances with Canada. They’ve already asked Hensley to do a lot, and the Poulin line is lurking.

Alex Carpenter has both U.S. goals tonight and five in her last eight periods. Yep, that’s a beamin’.

On how she’s producing: “I think just seeing what has been working for our team and learning from my teammates and trying to mimic what they’ve been doing; getting to the dirty areas in front of the net and really using your body to put those pucks in the net.”

On what she expects in the third period: “I think it’s going to be an all-out battle. We knew after the first period that they were gonna come out flying and we were just trying to weather the storm there a little, but I think we’re gonna get back in the locker room, regroup and have a good push out there in the third.”

This is on NHL Network in the U.S., if you’re looking for it.

If these U.S. jerseys weren’t ugly as hell, I’d be in the market for a Nicole Hensley. It’s 2-2 after two, mainly because of her.

The Americans will start the third period on the power play.

I’ve alluded to this already: I don’t watch a ton of women’s hockey. I’m working on that. One of the things I’ve picked up on, though, from paying attention to folks who, uh pay more attention — the officiating can be rough. That cross-check call on Megan Bozek to put Canada on the power play … yep, that qualifies.

No harm, no foul — Kendall Coyne Schofeld used her speed to create a nice shorthanded chance for the U.S., Canada couldn’t capitalize on some chaos in front of Nicole Hensley, and Hensley made a nice save on Renata Fast. Still though, never should’ve happened.

The thing about Jamie Lee Rattray ... She’s a gritty player, good below the hash marks, can bring energy to any line and all that good “versatile, depth forward” stuff.

But she’s also a former national champion with Clarkson, a Patty Kaz winner (awarded to the top player in college) and has a ton of skill as displayed by her tip to tie the game a two.

Jamie Lee Rattray has the prettiest goal of the night so far. First of four that hasn’t been scored amidst some net-front chaos. This game is a blast.

Natalie Spooner! Beam! Beam up and discuss your 2-0 deficit!

On the chatter on the bench after giving up the first goal: “We knew they were gonna come out hard ... Obviously, we’ve been down in first periods before, so I think we’re still feeling good, just trying to stay all over them and get pucks to the net.”

“Having a good F3 allows our D to pinch and keep pucks in their end. ... When we have success is when we get our feet moving, and they were F1 race cars going right at their D and keeping them pinned in, so I think if we’re doing those things then we’re going to have a lot of success.”

“I think (Canada’s young players) have been awesome this whole tournament. I think we’ve been trying to keep it really light and really fun, and I think just keep going. Obviously, we have been in this scenario with this team before, and I think (we) just have confidence in that, that we believe in ourselves and know we can come back.”

This is the first bit of adversity Canada has faced since the opening game of the tournament, going down 2-0 to Finland in the first period. A game they ultimately won 5-3.

Score at the end of the first period is Alex Carpenter 2, An Entire Country of People 0.

Minor change from the preliminary-round game, when (if I remember correctly) Canada outshot the U.S. 43-2 after 20 minutes.

Both of the U.S. goals have come on the doorstep right in front of Desbiens. What made Canada so dominant throughout this tournament, and against Team USA in the prelims, was their ability to keep teams on the perimeter and limit such high danger opportunities against.

Down 2-0 here, they (clearly) need to get back to executing that game plan.

Here’s the GIF I’ve been waiting for; Abbey Murphy dropping Natalie Spooner right in front of the benches. Carpenter scored about a minute later. Coincidence, I’m sure.

Alex Carpenter has scored the opening goal for Team USA in three straight games now.

A much more even start in the gold-medal match at the first TV timeout. Around this time in the preliminary matchup between these two teams, Canada already had a 2-0 lead. Now, it's 0-0 and the shots on goal are only 3-1 in favour of Canada.

We all knew this would be a different game. Canada is 6-0 in this tournament for a reason, but the U.S. won the last five world championships for a reason too.

We’ve seen it before in gold-medal games; sometimes, if the host country is involved, there’s a little bit of early tightness. It’s human nature. The crowd might turn into a benefit, but there’s an adjustment period. That’s got to be less of a thing in Calgary, right? There aren’t any fans. Not really, at least. Families are there, and most of the other teams in the tournament are as well (according to a random person in the arena), but there’s less palpable tension.

That’s how it works. Sounds like an unfair advantage for Canada, if you ask me.

Nicole Hensley is starting in goal for the U.S., over Alex Cavallini, which is probably how it had to be.

The preliminary-round mess wasn’t nearly on Cavallini, but Hensley just shut out Finland. She’s given up one goal all tournament, albeit against Canada. Feels like a no-brainer.

The U.S. at the World Championship: Roster turnover, the quest for another title and everything you need to know

Eye for an eye, baby. The U.S. is winning this one 5-1. That’s how rivalries should work.

Nah, I think it’ll be closer than that. There’s no reason for me to pick Canada here, either.

I’d rather be wrong, but patriotic in my wrongness. So I’ll say 4-3, USA. Seven total goals in honor of the seventh straight U.S. gold — and zero goals for the Natalie-Sarah Fillier-Mèlodie Daoust line. I’m not picking them to do it until they do it.

‘We are better than what we showed’: U.S. finds no silver lining in loss to Canada at women’s worlds

As the resident Canadian of this blog, I must say this is a pretty easy year to bet on Canada winning this game.

They’re the No. 1 seeded team in the tournament for a reason. Canada is a perfect 6-0 and has been dominant in every game they’ve played, outshooting opponents 313-66. They have a lot of talent, but have shown they will do all the little things too: they’re strong on the forecheck, first on pucks, and love to make life difficult in any way for their opponents.

Anything can happen in a single game, and the U.S. has a recent history of winning these games, so I think it will be close. But I haven’t seen anything the last 10 days that can deter me from betting on a Canada win.

Takeaways from Canada’s 4-0 start at women’s worlds: Beating the U.S., dominant puck possession and more

How to Watch IIHF Women's World Championship Finals, Canada vs. United States

Sports Illustrated 31 August, 2021 - 03:30pm

Team USA will look to avenge its 5-1 loss to Canada in the group stage of the tournament.

Date: Aug. 31, 2021

Time: 7:30 p.m. ET

TV: NHL Network

You can stream the game on fuboTV: Start with a 7-day free trial!

Since this event began in 1990, the United States and Canada have combined for all 19 championships. In fact, the 2019 final marked the only time that the two didn't meet in the championship game; instead, the United States played Finland for the title.

Canada, US advance to women's hockey final

Fox News 31 August, 2021 - 03:46am

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The United States and Canada will face off in the final of the women’s hockey world championship for the 19th time in 20 tournaments.

The five-time defending champion U.S. plays in its 20th gold-medal game on Tuesday, seeking to tie Canada with 10 titles. Canada, which ended the Americans’ 29-game win streak in the event on Thursday, aims for its first title since 2012.

Alex Carpenter and Abbey Murphy scored in the second period, and the United States beat Finland 3-0 on Monday in the first semifinal. In the late game, tournament scoring leader Melodie Daoust collected two more goals in Canada's 4-0 victory over Switzerland.

"We knew we had to come out hard and fast and take away any chances for Finland and I think we did just that," U.S. coach Joel Johnson said. "I was really impressed by how our team controlled the tempo against a skilled team like Finland. We’re going to enjoy this win, but we’ve got one more game to play."

Carpenter put the U.S. in front early in the second with her third goal of the tournament. Carpenter got a stick on Lee Stecklein’s shot from the point to redirect it past goaltender Anni Keisala.

Murphy scored on a breakaway late in the second. Murphy took advantage of a turnover at the blue line and went backhand to forehand for a shot that trickled by Keisala.

"Megan Keller had a nice blast up the wall, and I was ready for it, I wanted it, so it felt good," Murphy said after her second goal of the worlds.

Kendall Coyne Schofield added an empty-netter with 2:53 remaining to seal the rematch of the 2019 final that the U.S. won 2-1 in a controversial finish.

Finland, which was outshot 33-14, had a good offensive opportunity midway through the first period with a two-man advantage for two minutes, but the United States did not allow a shot.

Finland emptied its net on a power play with 7:22 remaining, but U.S. goalie Nicole Hensley kept it scoreless on the way to her second shutout against Finland this tournament.

The Finns will look to claim their 13th bronze medal on Tuesday against Switzerland.

In the second semi, Canada scored two first-period goals in less than two minutes to take control. Renata Fast scored the first and assisted Daoust on the second. Fast one-timed a nice pass from Brianne Jenner at the back post, and Daoust redirected Fast's shot 98 seconds later.

Canada outshot Switzerland 20-2 in the first period.

Daoust made it 3-0 during a power play in the second on a redirection that bounced over goalie Andrea Braendli. Daoust has six goals and six assists in six Canadian wins.

Rebecca Johnston sent a shot under the glove of Braendli to cap the scoring on a power play late in the third.

It was the first time in six tournament games Canada didn't score at least five goals.

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The 'LeBron's championship teammates' quiz

ESPN 30 August, 2021 - 11:02pm

Rajon Rondo won his second championship as a member of the 2019-20 Los Angeles Lakers. Last season, he split time between the Hawks and the Clippers. Now, after a trade to the Memphis Grizzlies and a subsequent buyout, Rondo appears ready to run it back in purple and gold. The Lakers have spent the offseason collecting ring-chasing veterans to play alongside LeBron James and Anthony Davis (and they might not be done yet). In a league where youth is typically king, it's a bold choice. Will the plan actually work? Only time will tell. 

Which brings us to today's quiz of the day. For an NBA vet looking to win that elusive ring, playing next to LeBron is never a bad option. In his four title runs, James has played with 49 different teammates. So with that in mind, how many of the King's men from his four championship teams can you name in five minutes?

Get the Quiz of the Day, one carefully curated quiz inspired by today's headlines. Test your knowledge and compete with your friends. Emailed every weekday. Always free!

It has been two days since a "high school" football team called Bishop Sycamore finagled its way onto an ESPN Sunday broadcast. But even as time passes, questions about the team's legitimacy remain unanswered as people formerly associated with the team begin to speak out. Former players and parents attached to the Ohio-based football program have begun telling their stories about the so-called team, which has somehow been around for three years. One parent detailed to Awful Announcing, which has been at the forefront reporting on the fiasco, his son's experience with the team which included poor treatment of players, expensive hotel bills being dropped on parents and countless lies at the hands of head coach Roy Johnson. In light of being blown out 58-0 by Florida-based powerhouse IMG Academy, reports began to emerge that Bishop Sycamore is not recognized by any major institution as a legitimate school. Reports also surfaced the team had played two games in three days, which breaks player safety protocols. It was later found some of the players on the roster are not high school age anymore and that Johnson has an active warrant out for his arrest. Both ESPN and Paragon, the company responsible for scheduling the matchups on the worldwide leader in sports, have said they didn't know the program's background prior to the game on Sunday. "We regret that this happened and have discussed it with Paragon, which secured the matchup and handles the majority of our high school event scheduling," ESPN said in a statement. "They have ensured us that they will take steps to prevent this kind of situation from happening moving forward." Paragon itself told Awful Announcing it wasn't informed that Bishop Sycamore had played a game two days before and told The Columbus Dispatch it received a different player roster on Sunday than they had when the game was scheduled one month prior. Now, it remains to be seen if more people will speak out with information about the program -- and if Bishop Sycamore's run as a fraudulent school will finally come to an end.

Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer recently had his paid administrative leave extended a seventh time through Sept. 3 by MLB and the MLB Players Association as he continues to face allegations of sexual assault. The City of Pasadena Police Department turned the case over to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office ahead of this past weekend, and ESPN's Jeff Passan has since provided an in-depth look at what could be next for the 30-year-old right-hander. Interestingly, Passan left no doubt Bauer's 2021 season is over. "If the DA does not make a decision on charges before the end of the season, Bauer almost certainly will remain on administrative leave," Passan explained. "If he's charged, MLB would either extend his administrative leave or use the paid-suspension provision in the policy. "If he's not charged, a suspension will be coming, and even if Bauer appeals, the lack of an immediate stay will prevent him from returning." Passan also said that Bauer could be facing anywhere between a one- and two-year suspension following a league investigation into the allegations made against the reigning National League Cy Young Award winner. He could be hit with the longest domestic violence ban since MLB implemented its policy in the summer of 2015. It's unclear if the Dodgers will welcome Bauer back or if any team would accept him assuming he'll be cleared to play at some point in 2022, 2023, or 2024.

No, the New York Islanders have not officially announced any contract for Casey Cizikas, but details of the expected deal are starting to drip out. Earlier this month, Elliotte Friedman of Sportsnet heard that the Islanders had a six-year deal with Cizikas that would carry an average annual value of $2.5M. The insider was clear that he couldn’t confirm it though, something that has become par for the course in the Lou Lamoriello era. Tuesday, Arthur Staple of The Athletic tweets that the report from Friedman appears to be accurate. He is also hearing that Cizikas has signed a six-year contract with an annual average value of around $2.5M. Staple notes that the AAV could end up being slightly higher, something that won’t be known until the contract is actually filed (and even then there’s no guarantee from this Islanders front office). Cizikas, 30, is pretty obviously not leaving the Islanders, given there would have been plenty of interest in him elsewhere on the open market. Though he is a true bottom-six option, likely unable to play any higher than that on a contending club, there’s real value in what he brings to the ice every night. A strong defensive presence, a physical player and a lynchpin of the Islanders’ four-line structure, he represents a fixture of the team even scoring just a handful of points each season. In 2020-21, he had seven goals and 14 points in 56 regular-season games but was a huge part of the team’s success in the playoffs. Cizikas won 142 of his 232 postseason faceoffs (61.2%), including a huge chunk of them in the defensive end. His presence frees up the team’s more talented offensive players to do exactly that—play offense—while neutralizing the opposition’s best as much as possible. A six-year deal may seem like a lifetime for a player who resides near the bottom of the lineup, but it’s likely the only way that the Islanders could keep his cap hit down. A $2.5M salary will allow the team to spend money elsewhere, like on free agents Kyle Palmieri and Zach Parise, who are both expected to also have deals signed with the team but not announced. Even if Cizikas’ play falls off a cliff, there’s not a ton of risk here for the Islanders. Nearly half of his expected cap hit could be buried in the minor leagues if necessary, leaving around $1.35M each season on the books near the end of the deal. That obviously doesn’t cripple a team’s finances, but keeping his cap hit relatively low over the next few years will only help the Islanders in this window of Stanley Cup contention they have opened.

New York Mets big-name acquisitions and underwhelming performers Francisco Lindor and Javier Baez would like to put the controversy sparked by the team's "thumbs-down" celebration in the past. As is often the case with such situations, the fans will have the final say about that. Ahead of Tuesday's home game against the Miami Marlins, both Lindor and Baez stood in front of cameras and offered apologies for the action that was a response to supporters booing the team at Citi Field. "I didn’t mean to offend anybody," Baez said, per SNY. "This is something that I’ve done in the past against the other team. I did it in LA to the dugout. I might [have said] something wrong about how I was booing the fans, and I really meant to [say] like, 'Boo me now' — and not to the fans — to our dugout because I’ve done it with the other team and against other teams. "I’ve never seen the same fans and I didn’t say the fans are bad. I love the fans. But I just felt like we were alone. The fans obviously want us to win, and they pay our salary, like everybody says. But we want to win, too. The frustration got to us, and I didn’t mean to offend anybody, and if I did offend anybody, we apologize." According to SNY, Lindor added: "It was to the dugout, the thumbs down. It was to the dugout. Thumbs down for me means the adversity we have gone through in this whole time. The negative things we have overcome. We did it. We went over it. However, it was wrong and I apologize to whoever I offended. It was not my intent to offend people. I can't go against the fans. I've never done it in my career. "We play for the fans, like Javy said. Javy said we play for the fans and he's 100% right. For our teammates, for the front office, for our families, for the city. So with that being said, I apologize and it didn't look good on our part." Both players also addressed the matter via Twitter, as did Mets owner Steve Cohen: Perhaps Lindor and company will embrace a thumbs-up approach over the final month of what's become a lost season for the Amazins.

Bryson DeCheambeau was not happy with the way fans heckled him last week over his ongoing rivalry with Brooks Koepka, and the PGA Tour is taking steps to prevent it from happening in the future. Several fans who attended the BMW Championship at Caves Valley Gold Club in Maryland could be heard yelling “Brooksie!” at DeChambeau throughout the tournament. After DeChambeau lost to Patrick Cantlay in a six-hole playoff, he had a heated exchange with one such fan that nearly turned ugly. On Tuesday, PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said yelling “Brooksie!” at DeChambeau will now be considered harassing or disrespectful fan behavior and could result in an ejection. Monahan added that it has been a “long season” with dealing with instances of inappropriate fan behavior. He said the PGA Tour began working on an official fan code of conduct last season. The DeChambeau-Koepka rivalry has been good for golf, and DeChambeau has certainly done everything he can to keep it going. It’s baffling that yelling another golfer’s name at a Tour player could be considered such a serious offense, but here we are. Fans will almost certainly find other ways to heckle DeChambeau. He’s the most polarizing golfer on the PGA Tour, and we were reminded of why with the awkward exchange he had with Cantlay on Sunday (video here).

As of the final weekend of August, the SEC was the only Power 5 conference that hadn't yet publicly finalized policies regarding potential coronavirus-related setbacks for the upcoming college football season. That changed Monday afternoon. "In the event a team is unable to begin or complete a regular season conference event due to the unavailability of participants (due to COVID-19, injuries or other reasons), that team will forfeit the contest and will be assigned a loss in the conference standings," the SEC announced in a release. "The opposing team that is ready to play will be credited with a win in the conference standings. Both teams will be deemed to have played and completed the contest for purpose of the conference standings." "If both teams are unable to compete due to the unavailability of participants (due to COVID-19, injuries or other reasons), both teams shall be deemed to have forfeited the game, with a loss assigned to both teams and applied to the conference standings. Both teams will be deemed to have played and completed the contest for purpose of the conference standings." Interestingly, SEC commissioner Greg Sankey can declare a game a "no contest" if "extraordinary circumstances warrant" such a decision. Examples of such circumstances were not mentioned on Monday. As Heather Dinich noted for ESPN, the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, Mountain West Conference and American Athletic Conference previously embraced similar policies.

Saturday's NFL preseason finale between the New Orleans Saints and Arizona Cardinals had to be canceled because of Hurricane Ida. It seems the storm will also impact the first college football Saturday of September. According to Adam Rittenberg of ESPN, Saturday's showdown between the No. 2 Oklahoma Sooners and Tulane Green Wave set to occur at Yulman Stadium in New Orleans will be relocated because of the aftermath of the storm. Tulane athletic director Troy Dannen took to Twitter to somewhat refute the report: Rittenberg wrote that Tulane "has contingency plans" to play Saturday's matchup currently scheduled to begin at noon ET in Oklahoma. Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castiglione addressed the matter this past Friday: Tulane is currently practicing in Birmingham, Ala. ahead of Saturday. Meanwhile, the Saints may have to open their regular season "hosting" the Green Bay Packers at AT T Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys, if they're not cleared to play in New Orleans by Sept. 12.

The Patriots released veteran quarterback Cam Newton on Tuesday after weeks of speculation regarding whether he’d be New England’s starter in 2021-22. With the move, New England has signaled that rookie quarterback Mac Jones will be the starter. For weeks, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick has seemingly maintained that Newton would likely be the one to lead the offense heading into next season. That all began to change in recent days, when Newton suffered one embarrassing setback after another. The former MVP’s cryptic social media posts from that point forward suggested that there was trouble in paradise – culminating in what transpired early Tuesday morning. Ultimately, three very specific things ended up changing the trajectory of Newton’s relationship with the Patriots. “There wasn’t just one reason that Cam Newton is gone. It was a combination of at least three,” reported Adam Beasley of the Pro Football Network. “I’m told: Mac Jones’ emergence, Newton’s vaccination stance (which caused a bit of a stir behind the scenes) and Cam’s uninspiring performance this summer.” Jones played 107 snaps in the preseason, the most of any Patriots quarterback. In that time he went 36-of-52 for 389 yards, with one touchdown and no interceptions. Newton, meanwhile, finished the preseason 14-of-21 for 162 yards, with one touchdown and one interception. Last year, with Newton leading them, the Patriots became something of a laughingstock. At one point, opposing teams were openly ridiculing Belichick over how terrible their offense was. Memories of that were no doubt still fresh when Tuesday’s decision was made. By getting rid of Newton, the Patriots indicated that a new era was beginning. How will that new era ultimately turn out for them? Time will tell.

Joel Embiid seems to be totally unbothered about the current drama surrounding his team. The Philadelphia 76ers star sent a funny tweet on Tuesday after news broke that teammate Ben Simmons has formally requested a trade. Embiid asked if there was any trade news … regarding European soccer club Real Madrid. Embiid continued the troll job by referencing Real Madrid’s stalled efforts to acquire Paris Saint-Germain superstar Kylian Mbappe, saying, “We’ll get it done in January.” Longtime Real Madrid fan Embiid might be happy to learn that the team managed to sign 18-year-old phenom Eduardo Camavinga from French club Rennes in the meantime. But Embiid definitely cannot be happy about what is going on with his actual team. In addition to Simmons, the Sixers might be losing another one of Embiid’s teammates as well.

The Nationals announced they’ve optioned center fielder Víctor Robles to Triple-A Rochester. Fellow outfielder Andrew Stevenson has been recalled in his place. It’s the culmination of back-to-back poor seasons for Robles, who finds himself in the minors for the first time since 2018. Robles has more or less been Washington’s everyday center fielder over the past three seasons, a role he’s been expected to hold for years. A one-time top prospect, Robles seized the center field job during the Nats’ World Series winning 2019 campaign. While he was a slightly below-average hitter that year, Robles rated as one of the league’s best baserunners and defensive outfielders. Only 22 years old, he looked to be a core piece who could emerge as an All-Star caliber player with just a bit of an improvement at the plate over the coming seasons. Not only has Robles not taken another step offensively, he’s completely fallen flat at the plate. Since the start of the 2020 campaign, the right-handed hitter has posted a .209/.304/.302 line over 558 plate appearances. That translates to a 67 wRC+ that suggests Robles has been 33 percentage points worse than the league average hitter. Of the 181 hitters with 500+ plate appearances over the past two years, only four (Kevin Newman, Elvis Andrus, Gregory Polanco and Garrett Hampson) have been less productive at the plate. Those struggles have cost Robles playing time in recent days, as he hadn’t started a game since Friday. Lane Thomas, acquired from the Cardinals at the trade deadline, has started the past three games in center and is in the lineup there again tonight. With Robles relegated to fourth outfielder duty at the big league level, the Nationals have evidently determined it better to get him continued reps against minor league pitching. The Nationals could bring Robles back up relatively shortly, as position players only need be on optional assignment for ten days before they’re eligible to be recalled. (They can be brought up within ten days if recalled to replace an injured player). However, the timing of the demotion could suggest they’re prepared to leave Robles in the minors for additional experience. Active rosters expand from 26 to 28 players starting tomorrow, so the Nats weren’t under immediate pressure to make a move from a roster limit perspective. Instead, it seems the team has decided an optional assignment to be the more prudent course of action for Robles’ long-term development. Even if Robles doesn’t return to the majors this season, the demotion shouldn’t have an effect on his service time outlook. He entered the season with 2.052 years of big league time and has already accrued around 152 days of service this season. That’s more than enough to push him beyond the three-year threshold as had been anticipated. He’ll qualify for arbitration for the first time this offseason and is still ticketed to reach free agency over the 2024-25 offseason — assuming he begins next year on Washington’s active roster.

Canada blanks Switzerland 4-0, meets U.S. for women's world hockey gold

Toronto Sun 30 August, 2021 - 09:41pm

The 29-year-old from Valleyfield, Que., scored twice to lead the host country in a 4-0 semifinal win over Switzerland on Monday.

Canada meets defending champion United States for the gold medal Tuesday.

The Americans are chasing a sixth straight world title and their ninth in the last 10 world championships.

Canada last won a world title in 2012 in Burlington, Vt.

"We've been waiting for this moment for way too long," Daoust said.

Canada returns to the gold-medal game after falling to host Finland in a 2019 semifinal and taking bronze in Espoo.

It was the first time in the history of the tournament the Canadians didn't reach the final.

Daoust is a two-time Olympian, but donned the Maple Leaf in a world championship for just the second time after her debut in Espoo.

"It was a long road, lots of ups and downs with injuries and really glad to be here as surrounded by this team," Daoust said.

She leads the championship in scoring with six goals and six assists in six games ahead of linemate Natalie Spooner with four goals and five assists.

Renata Fast had a goal and an assist, Rebecca Johnston scored and Marie-Philip Poulin had two assists for host Canada, which remained unbeaten in the tournament.

Ann-Renee Desbiens posted a 10-save shutout. Andrea Braendli was a workhorse in Switzerland's net stopping 61-of-65 shots.

"She's a huge part (of) why it's only four-nothing today," Swiss captain Lara Stalder said.

The 2020 women's championship was cancelled because of COVID-19. The 2021 tournament was rescheduled to Calgary in August when Nova Scotia called it off in May.

After the final buzzer, Daoust skated to the glass to wave to her three-year-old son Matheo. Daoust hasn't held her son since July when she and her teammates arrived in Calgary.

"Way too long. It's been 40 days-plus that we've been here in Calgary," Daoust said. "It's been a challenge for sure, but I'm really happy that I'm surrounded by all my friends here to pick me up every day.

"I guess it really helps when you have a goal in mind. He's the reason why I'm here. And I want to prove (to) him that if you have a dream in mind, you want to go till the end for it. I hope he's going to be proud of me."

The Americans blanked Finland 3-0 earlier Monday.

Canada beat the U.S. 5-1 to cap the preliminary-round and post a 4-0 record in Pool A. Canada blanked Germany 7-0 in a quarterfinal.

The Swiss finished at the bottom of Pool A at 0-4.

A 3-2 overtime win over Russia in Saturday's quarterfinal was Switzerland's first victory of the tournament, and vaulted the Swiss into the final for the first time since 2012 when they won bronze.

Switzerland mustered the occasional foray into Canada's zone Monday, but spent most of their time and energy in their own zone trying to keep the puck out of their own net.

Johnston wired a shot into the far corner for a power-play goal at 16:58 of the third period.

Canada made Switzerland pay for Sarah Forster's glove to Emily Clark's face after a whistle with Daoust's power-play goal in the second period.

Poulin's shot deflected off Daoust into the air and over Braendli at 5:20.

Daoust scored her first with a long re-direct of a Fast shot at 6:52 of the opening period.

Fast had a lot of net to work with from the slot when Brianne Jenner fed her from the wing at 5:14.

Canada blanked Switzerland 5-0 in the preliminary round and has yet to give up a goal to the Swiss in eight world championship meetings.

Finland and Switzerland will play for bronze, and Russia and Japan will meet in the fifth-place game Tuesday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 30, 2021.

Canada won the women's world hockey championship for the first time in almost a decade on Tuesday with a 3-2 overtime win over the United States.

One bad inning cost Hyun-Jin Ryu and the Blue Jays' offence couldn't bail him out.

The latest news out of Philadelphia isn't going to help Simmons' trade value.

The Brand Hand era in Toronto is over.

Andy Murray opened the floodgates for commentary on Stefanos Tsitsipas' bathroom habits.

With a roiled fan base, an apology and a walk-off slide, the Mets found a win to turn the tides.

The starting options might be very limited, but Newton certainly could find work with a new club.

A federal judge blocked Western Michigan University from carrying out its threat to remove four players from its women’s soccer team for not complying with the school’s vaccine mandate for student-athletes.

The PGA Tour has announced it will crack down on heckling to keep galleries calmer.

The Saints were supposed to play the Packers in New Orleans in Week 1.

The Flyers forward shared a beautiful story about how his brother, beloved former NHL player Jimmy Hayes, impacted the people around him.

Bishop Sycamore is a "high school" that may or may not actually exist.

More than two years after the death of Tyler Skaggs, the question of who is responsible still remains.

The Jesperi Kotkaniemi offer-sheet drama and everything surrounding it is great for a league constantly starving for intriguing off-ice narratives.

Here are five pointers that'll surely help make you a more informed and effective sports bettor.

Matt Harmon is joined by Jourdan Rodrigue from The Athletic and Kyle Posey from Niners Nation to go deep on two of fantasy’s most exciting teams, the San Francisco 49ers and the Los Angeles Rams. Matt and Jourdan, who covered Cam Newton in Carolina, also talk about the Patriots’ move to release Cam Newton and what it means for Cam and the Patriots playmakers.

BEREA, Ohio (AP) — For the longest time, Malik McDowell feared he had thrown away his promising football career and ruined his life. His chances seemed all used up. The Browns, though, decided to give him another — a final one — and he's making the most of it. A long shot when Cleveland signed him in May, McDowell, who spent time in jail after a run of serious legal troubles, survived the final cuts Tuesday and was awarded one of 53 spots on the Browns' roster. It's a remarkable comeback and jou

A look at what's happening around the majors today: ___ OUCH! The NL East-leading Braves will be minus All-Star second baseman Ozzie Albies for a bit after he fouled a ball off his left knee at Dodger Stadium. Albies went down in the fifth inning and had to be carried off the field Tuesday night. He’s batting .260 and leads the National League with 63 extra-base hits. The team said X-rays were negative. Albies will be re-evaluated in a couple days after the ball struck him on the kneecap. “That

The AP NFL Coach of the Year Award is a narrative award. Which head coach will author the best story in 2021?

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