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The Cut 23 August, 2021 - 04:36pm 11 views

What day does nine perfect strangers come on?

New episodes of Nine Perfect Strangers drop every Wednesday at 12:01AM ET. Esquire.comHow Many Episodes of 'Nine Perfect Strangers' Are on Hulu? 'Nine Perfect Strangers' Release Schedule

But after learning of Nicole Kidman's involvement in the project as Masha, the Russian guru running the wellness program, the role shot to the top of his list. 

On NPR's most recent "Weekend Edition Sunday," the Filipino-Canadian actor, 34, told host Susan Davis that Yao's "unwavering devotion" to the head of Tranquillum House became apparent to him during his early read-throughs.

"I just so happened to find out that it was Nicole Kidman that was leading Tranquillum. So when I obviously found that out, you know, you kind of take it a lot more seriously than other auditions that come your way," he said.

After Davis joked that actors should blindly agree to projects with Kidman, who also served as an executive producer on the series, Jacinto replied: "Absolutely."

He quipped, "Do you need me to be background? Yes. Yeah. Do you need me to cater for you? Absolutely."

Jacinto isn't in the background of "Nine Perfect Strangers," though; He's at the forefront of David E. Kelley's eight-episode adaptation of Liane Moriarty's 2018 novel, standing right by Kidman's side.

From the moment the nine guests arrive on the retreat's property, Jacinto's Yao serves as Masha's selfless right-hand man. His relationship with his employer straddles the line between steadfast loyalty and obsession, as he devotes his life, both personal and professional, to helping Masha realize her vision for the retreat. 

Jacinto, best known for his role as Jason Mendoza on NBC's "The Good Place," admitted that it could have easily been "intimidating" to share scenes with an actor as successful and experienced as Kidman. She made sure it wasn't.

"Right off the bat when I first met her, she's just like a regular human being. And if anything, actually pretty shy and just super grounded. She's a very open, vulnerable scene partner … open to criticisms, open to playing around and being very playful, especially as that character," he told The Star.

Jacinto continued, "We have such a tight relationship as Yao and Masha that we needed that. You can't help but separate the stardom of what is Nicole Kidman, but she was able to do that right off the bat by just being present and being open with me."

The first three episodes of "Nine Perfect Strangers" are available to stream on Hulu, with new episodes released on a weekly basis. 

Read full article at The Cut

Nicole Kidman pushed for Asher Keddie to play Heather in 'Nine Perfect Strangers' after American financiers said she was too 'unknown'

Yahoo! Voices 23 August, 2021 - 10:50pm

On Wednesday, Hulu dropped the first three episodes of its most star-studded scripted series to date, David E. Kelley’s adaptation of Liane Moriarty’s bestselling novel Nine Perfect Strangers. Directed by Jonathan Levine and co-produced by Nicole Kidman, the limited series takes place in an exclusive wellness retreat where the titular guests attempt to undergo some spiritual and physical transformation, guided by a sketchy Russian guru named Masha, played by Kidman in yet another distracting wig.

As Kevin Fallon opined in his review, the series is a tonal mishmash. Despite some performances that would otherwise attract immediate awards buzz if placed in a better show, notably from Melissa McCarthy and Michael Shannon, none of them really coalesce to create a dynamic ensemble. Nor do any of these broadly written characters or the evidently fraudulent institution warrant that much intrigue. On a marketing level, the series also faces the burden of competing with the hype of HBO’s just-concluded smash hit The White Lotus, which also portrays rich people swapping their privileged at-home lives for another privileged experience in an exotic location, and Kelley’s previous Moriarty adaptation Big Little Lies, where his pen is far more robust.

Whether or not Nine Perfect Strangers attracts the fanfare it’s clamoring for with its cast of A-listers, its presence in the zeitgeist, and wonky, cult-ish portrayal of the wellness industry, along with other new media, feels indicative of a growing exhaustion and cynicism surrounding the state of self-care and wellness, particularly the ways it’s manifested in American life just over the past few years, from social media to QAnon conspiracies to corporate advertising and, of course, the current pandemic.

Wellness—encompassing holistic practices and dubious remedies—is hardly a new phenomenon in the United States, although it feels like it’s become ubiquitous over the past decade. Since colonialism, the Western world has been importing and appropriating Eastern methods of medicine and spiritual practices that are now associated with catchall terms like “New Age,” “alternative medicine,” and even “Goop.” Self-care as a rationalization for incorporating wellness and self-improvement into our lives also has a deeper history than the average Instagram user inundated with #selfcare sponcon would be led to believe, promoted by ancient philosophers and repopularized in political environments like the women’s liberation movement of the ’70s and, specifically, queer Black feminist spaces. (This is why writer and activist Audre Lorde’s definition of the term is often referenced on the feminist sections of the internet.)

Now more than ever, these practices and their philosophies have been detached from their histories, stripped of their nuances and monetized by corporations and upper-class white people—but most visibly in pop culture, upper-class white women. In a piece for The New Yorker, Jordan Kisner writes about the “#selfcare-as-politics movement of 2016” that was ironically “powered by straight, affluent white women” in response to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and subsequent election, a moment that awakened much of that demographic politically. Likewise, the rich white woman who collects crystals, receives sound baths and is obsessed with tarot cards and, most significantly, considers herself an expert in these customs has captured our collective attention and skepticism, from Gwyneth Paltrow and her Goop empire, Kourtney Kardashian’s try at her own Goop, shows like the aforementioned Nine Perfect Strangers and Fox’s Fantasy Island (although the rich woman is Latina).

While Lorde lacks a strong rebuttal to the Gwyneth Paltrow figure—maybe because it’s too close to home— the singer’s analysis of wellness culture and its misappropriations feels sharper when aimed toward men. On the Solar Power song “Dominoes,” she lambasts the specific type of man who takes on gardening, weed, and yoga to rebrand from his toxicity and misogyny. “It must feel good to be Mr. Start Again,” she sings caustically. The song cleverly illustrates how goodness is often ascribed to men who associate themselves with activities that are deemed feminine within our culture. But it also gets at the way self-improvement can easily be utilized as a Band-Aid or a facade in place of doing the actual work.

As culture becomes more and more desperate for healing, whether from political divisions, as our president constantly suggests, or literal life-threatening diseases like COVID-19, the space between community and cult, non-traditional medicine and pseudoscience, self-care and individualism seems to be capturing our artistic imaginations at an extremely vital time. How can the roots of wellness be reclaimed and reasserted when it’s become a $4.4 trillion money grab and employed for the most dangerous political agendas? Lorde’s Solar Power and Nine Perfect Strangers may not be perfect articulations of these quandaries, but they show how much there is to mine in that danger zone.

Manny Jacinto talks 'Nine Perfect Strangers' and Nicole Kidman

Insider 23 August, 2021 - 10:50pm

But after learning of Nicole Kidman's involvement in the project as Masha, the Russian guru running the wellness program, the role shot to the top of his list. 

On NPR's most recent "Weekend Edition Sunday," the Filipino-Canadian actor, 34, told host Susan Davis that Yao's "unwavering devotion" to the head of Tranquillum House became apparent to him during his early read-throughs.

"I just so happened to find out that it was Nicole Kidman that was leading Tranquillum. So when I obviously found that out, you know, you kind of take it a lot more seriously than other auditions that come your way," he said.

After Davis joked that actors should blindly agree to projects with Kidman, who also served as an executive producer on the series, Jacinto replied: "Absolutely."

He quipped, "Do you need me to be background? Yes. Yeah. Do you need me to cater for you? Absolutely."

Jacinto isn't in the background of "Nine Perfect Strangers," though; He's at the forefront of David E. Kelley's eight-episode adaptation of Liane Moriarty's 2018 novel, standing right by Kidman's side.

From the moment the nine guests arrive on the retreat's property, Jacinto's Yao serves as Masha's selfless right-hand man. His relationship with his employer straddles the line between steadfast loyalty and obsession, as he devotes his life, both personal and professional, to helping Masha realize her vision for the retreat. 

Jacinto, best known for his role as Jason Mendoza on NBC's "The Good Place," admitted that it could have easily been "intimidating" to share scenes with an actor as successful and experienced as Kidman. She made sure it wasn't.

"Right off the bat when I first met her, she's just like a regular human being. And if anything, actually pretty shy and just super grounded. She's a very open, vulnerable scene partner … open to criticisms, open to playing around and being very playful, especially as that character," he told The Star.

Jacinto continued, "We have such a tight relationship as Yao and Masha that we needed that. You can't help but separate the stardom of what is Nicole Kidman, but she was able to do that right off the bat by just being present and being open with me."

The first three episodes of "Nine Perfect Strangers" are available to stream on Hulu, with new episodes released on a weekly basis. 

Nine Perfect Strangers review: Nicole Kidman is the biggest disappointment of this series

The Indian Express 23 August, 2021 - 10:50pm

A svelte Russian Rapunzel, a luxury retreat, nine Americans looking for “transformation”, and a lot of Oriental mysticism. It starts with a namaste and is, presumably, headed for Nirvana — by way of meditation, sitting cross-legged on the ground for sessions, acupuncture and lying down in dirt to connect with “Mother Earth”.

The sweat and tears shed by the nine, looking for a 2.0 version of themselves that is pared both mentally and physically, sure couldn’t have asked for a more luxurious setting in this David E. Kelley creation. Tranquilum is the kind of retreat where being “natural” costs serious money. A glass building with swathes of green expanse around it, pools and hot springs, river, brown and yellow tones, wood flooring, bowls showcasing Japanese art of repair, plates resembling sliced tree logs, food that looks almost too lovely to eat, plus is specific to each one’s metabolic requirements, etc etc. And, above all, looms the tall, lean mysterious Masha (Nicole Kidman), the queen of this kingdom, in her blonde tresses, white overalls, and a very curious threesome with her two aides.

Three episodes down, Amazon Prime Video’s Nine Perfect Strangers is building up to be a mystery that may have spent too much time on the setting than the people who inhabit it — not to mention its cringing co-opting of Indian particulars with, pointedly, no Indian to mar the picture. The nine include a family grieving a death, a football star in the twilight of his fame, a writer fearing oblivion, an Englishman with a just-ended relationship, a particularly rich and young couple having issues, and a perfectly good mother looking to lose some weight and gain some self-esteem.

They all have traumas, which is why Masha has selectively curated and accepted them as guests. They presumably have no issues that her routine includes random drawing of blood from her guests and, yet, they carp at the inaner stuff.

The two who seem the most interesting at this point are Jessica (Weaving) and Heather (Keddie) — both with the least baggage of being a character. They are what they are, and Jessica especially makes you see beyond the stereotype of the blonde cheerleader missing her Instagram (among, other things, Tranquilum requires its guests to surrender their phones and not post about it later on social media).

The biggest injustice is to McCarthy as the writer of romantic bestsellers Frances Welty. The Hulu series, based on a bestseller, is glad to have the actress around but also almost not. While she still sizzles, McCarthy is swathed, always, in these gowns, flowing robes and top-to-bottom lycras that tie down the vivacious actress.

But, it’s Kidman and her Masha — described once by Frances as this “amazing, mysterious, Eastern bloc unicorn” — who is the most disappointing. We have seen Kidman, also the executive producer, in this role now once too often.

For all the latest Entertainment News, download Indian Express App.

Here's When Every Episode of 'Nine Perfect Strangers' Is Dropping on Hulu

Yahoo Lifestyle 23 August, 2021 - 04:10pm

The series takes place in a tropical, if not eerie spa where a retreat leader by the name of Masha promises that people will leave the resort happier than when they came to it. Of course, we're dealing with some pretty broken people at the start of the series, so it's not difficult to imagine that they would leave happier. But even one episode in, it becomes evident that Masha and her staff of dedicated spa workers have plans for these "nine perfect strangers" that are further removed from anything they could imagine.

Hulu bet big on the series, dropping three episodes on the series' launch date, August 18. The installments of "Random Acts of Mayhem," "The Critical Path," and "Earth Day" are only three of the eventual eight episodes that the series will release before it wraps up on September 22.

Jacinto plays Yao, a wellness consultant at Tranquillum House, in David E. Kelley's limited series "Nine Perfect Strangers."

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Exclusive Sneak Peek At Carmel’s Backstory On 'Nine Perfect Strangers'

Essence 23 August, 2021 - 11:43am

Played by Regina Hall, Carmel is the only Tranquillum guest who seems to actually want to be there. And in this week’s episode, we learn why she’s come to the wellness retreat for “weight loss, esteem-building, and mind and body transformation,” as she shared in episode one.

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Exclusive Sneak Peek At Carmel’s Backstory On 'Nine Perfect Strangers'

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 23 August, 2021 - 11:43am

Played by Regina Hall, Carmel is the only Tranquillum guest who seems to actually want to be there. And in this week’s episode, we learn why she’s come to the wellness retreat for “weight loss, esteem-building, and mind and body transformation,” as she shared in episode one.

Essence may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice.

©2021 ESSENCE Communications Inc. All Rights Reserved. | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Essence.com Advertising Terms

By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

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