Google is looking into Pixel 5a video overheating issues and touchscreen problems

Technology

9to5Google 30 August, 2021 - 10:42am 43 views

- Aug. 30th 2021 8:42 am PT

The Pixel 5a with 5G launched just this month with stellar battery life and a solid price point, but it does seem to have one flaw. As many have pointed out, heat seems to cause trouble for the Pixel 5a, but Google is looking into overheating problems on the device.

It’s been reported by quite a few people in recent weeks that the Pixel 5a has an overheating problem. Specifically, the issue seems to take place when recording 4K video. In our own testing, Kyle Bradshaw found that the Pixel 5a would stop recording after about 4 minutes of recording 4K video with heat as the cause.

In Android Central’s case, the problem also kicked in after shooting some simple photos and 1080p clips, with the overheating message kicking in after 30 minutes. The publication also noted some touchscreen issues with the bottom half of the display, something that Android Police’s Ryne Hager also had problems with.

Google has confirmed that the company is investigating both issues. With the touchscreen problems, the issue apparently goes away when using the phone in safe mode, implying it’s likely a software issue that Google can patch up. The company says it’s looking into it. As for the overheating problems on Pixel 5a, Google is investigating the problem with the thought it may be tied to the Camera app.

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Ben is a writer and video producer for 9to5Google.

Find him on Twitter @NexusBen. Send tips to schoon@9to5g.com or encrypted to benschoon@protonmail.com.

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Google Pixel 6 could crash iPhone 13 party with September 13 launch

Tom's Guide 30 August, 2021 - 03:42pm

The Pixel 6 could arrive sooner than we thought

The tipster posted on Chinese social media site Weibo. This person claims that Google will hold its international Pixel 6 press conference on September 13. If true, September is going to be a really, really busy month for smartphones.

Not only is the iPhone 13 expected to take all the attention for next month, but rumors over the weekend said that Samsung is planning to launch the Galaxy S21 FE in September. That phone is tipped to be a more affordable Galaxy S21, and could really give the Pixel 6 a run for its money (depending on how Google structures pricing).

Among other key specs, the S21 FE should have a Snapdragon 888 processor, making for a very powerful phone — we're still not sure how Google's new Tensor system-on-chip for the Pixel 6 will compare to Qualcomm's best silicon. It's anyone's guess right now.

Google has already spilled some of the beans on the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro. Both phones will feature the new Tensor processor, which Google allegedly designed in tandem with Samsung. Tensor will supposedly focus on AI and machine learning, potentially making the Pixel 6 the most powerful phone ever in that regard.

Performance-wise, Tensor is not expected to outdo the Snapdragon 888 or A14 Bionic (certainly not the upcoming A15 Bionic). But with Google controlling the hardware, the Pixel 6 could be a unique Android phone. For starters, it could equal longer support, with some rumors claiming that Google will back the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro for five years with updates.

Both phones should have 50MP main cameras with a 12MP ultrawide. The Pixel 6 Pro should have a 48MP telephoto lens with 4x optical zoom. We think that this hardware combined with Google's existing computational photography prowess will make the Pixel 6 one of the best camera phones.

The smaller Pixel 6 is expected to have a 6.4-inch OLED display with a 90Hz refresh rate, along with a 4,614 mAh battery. We anticipate that the Pixel 6 Pro will have a larger 6.7-inch OLED display with a 120Hz refresh rate.

From all appearances, Google is going all out with the Pixel 6 with a wholly new design and true flagship specs. Of course, the company has also alluded to true flagship pricing, too, which might disappoint some Pixel fans. Google is also allegedly planning to push the Pixel 6 hard in terms of marketing. We'll just have to see.

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Here's how many of our readers said they'll buy a charger with the Pixel 6

PhoneArena 30 August, 2021 - 07:00am

- Aug. 30th 2021 5:00 am PT

The lack of an in-the-box charger means that if you want access to faster-charging methods with the upcoming Pixel 6 or 6 Pro, then you’ll have to stump up extra cash to buy one. To our surprise, the response from you, our readers, when we asked late last week was not quite what we expected.

We had a substantial response to the question about whether you will buy a new or separate charger with the Pixel 6 series. It’s undoubtedly a sore point, even despite Google’s protestations that this is an environmental decision to reduce the mountain of e-waste generated each year with massive tech product launches.

Google acknowledging that there is a problem with e-waste is a good thing. We’re sure that nobody is denying that aspect of this decision, and this issue lies with how it will be implemented. In theory, the reduction of accessories should lead to a reduction in the cost of the Pixel 6 or 6 Pro. Whether that will be the case remains to be seen, but it’s easy to see fans’ frustrations when there’s no cost saving passed on.

Regardless, it shocked us to see that over 50% – 50.1% to be precise – of our readers said that they won’t buy a separate charger with the Pixel 6 or 6 Pro. They will simply use their existing charger and/or cable. Maybe Google is right here? If 1 in 2 buyers do so, then that would amount to a significant reduction in chargers needing to be produced with the new devices.

While we don’t know for certain, EeZeEpEe noted that if the Pixel 6 does indeed include fast charging, they will be hoping the 65W USB-C charger that comes with the Pixelbook Go will be able to charge at higher speeds. We’ll admit that this is something we hadn’t initially anticipated but it would be great if this is the case come fall. One response we heard multiple times was that “fast charge kills the battery with heat” and is yet another salient point regarding a new power brick even though many smartphones include technology to mitigate against this effect. Many will likely stick with slow charging for this reason to prolong the life span of their Pixel 6.

32.4% of you out there said you will be buying a new charger with the Pixel 6 or 6 Pro, as you want access to faster-charging speeds. It’s an extra annoyance and potential upfront cost, but given the potential cost, understandably people want to see a charger still come in the box. Personally, I can understand why people see this as a “pure money grab,” but we still don’t know if the Pixel 6 and 6 Pro will have their prices reduced to reflect the charger removal – although an eternal pessimist might say that prices will remain high.

Third-party charger makers will undoubtedly rub their hands together at the prospect of another device they can sell accessories for, but only 8.8% of you said you’d buy a power brick from firms such as Anker and Spigen. Aftermarket chargers likely won’t be made to the same high standards as official Pixel 6 chargers, but the quality of such add-ons has improved year-over-year as these firms have grown in much the same way that the biggest smartphone OEMs have. There is way less risk now in buying a charger or charge cable for the Pixel 6 – or any phone, for that matter.

Unsurprisingly, a minuscule portion of just 4.1% of you out there will buy a charger with the Pixel 6, as you simply don’t own a USB-C charger already. It took a long while for Android devices – and some Apple devices – to adopt the charging standard, but now they are so ubiquitous that it’s surprising when people don’t already own at least a cable or compatible power brick.

That left 4.6% of you out there telling us that you simply won’t buy the Pixel 6 or will be picking up another smartphone because of the lack of an in-the-box charger. That’s a fair point, especially as many affordable Androids still pack in the accessory without an effect on the entry pricing. However, we’re sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s easy to see that the industry will slowly phase out such “free” add-ons and extras over the coming years.

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Damien is a UK-based video producer for 9to5Google. Find him on Twitter: @iamdamienwilde. Email: damien@9to5mac.com

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Google Is Investigating Why the Pixel 5a Is Overheating, While Specifically Focusing on the Camera App

Wccftech 30 August, 2021 - 06:57am

On paper, the Pixel 5a 5G is one of the best mid-rangers that you can purchase if you are on a tight budget, if not for one small problem; it overheats rapidly. Thankfully, Google has taken notice of the issue and has decided to commence a little investigation of its own to isolate the problem.

Apparently, the problem is related to the camera app. Previously, lots of publications stated that the Pixel 5a would overheat in around five minutes while recording at 4K 60FPS. Unfortunately, the issue has trickled down to lower resolutions, too, with Android Central reporting that after capturing a few images and recording at the 1080p resolution, the mid-ranger would start giving a warning sign that it is overheating.

These thermal issues are similar to the ones users reported while using the Pixel 5, and keep in mind that the Pixel 5a can also overheat during some gaming sessions, which is unacceptable. One user also stated that Google’s latest smartphone would start giving off a warning during an hour of live streaming at 1080p. Even turning on the air conditioner did little to improve the situation, so the only way to resolve this is to wait for Google’s conclusion of the investigation.

Hopefully, the problem is just related to the software and not hardware, meaning that an update could be rolled out in a few days to fix the issue. Assuming Google overlooked the camera overheating conundrum on the Pixel 5a, this revelation might be a Godsend for the Mountain View giant as it could tweak the optics of the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro. After these two models are officially launched, perhaps they will not exhibit the same behavior as the less expensive member of the Pixel lineup.

Do you think it is unacceptable for the Pixel 5a 5G to be overheating this way? Tell us down in the comments.

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Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro tipped for September 13 global launch

Notebookcheck.net 29 August, 2021 - 12:00am

According to information coming out of China, Google plans to launch the Pixel 6 series globally on September 13. It's a bit amusing that this leak is coming from a Chinese source, as Google generally doesn't even sell its phones in that market. It does sell its phones in Taiwan, however, and the source has a solid track record with leaks.

The Pixel 6 series will be powered by Google's semi-custom chipset, Tensor, and is expected to offer high refresh rate displays, 33 W charging, UWB, and 50 MP cameras. Pricing specifics remain unknown but the Pixel 6 Pro is expected to carry a hefty price tag in line with its premium hardware.

Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro tipped for September 13 global launch

Chrome Unboxed 29 August, 2021 - 12:00am

According to information coming out of China, Google plans to launch the Pixel 6 series globally on September 13. It's a bit amusing that this leak is coming from a Chinese source, as Google generally doesn't even sell its phones in that market. It does sell its phones in Taiwan, however, and the source has a solid track record with leaks.

The Pixel 6 series will be powered by Google's semi-custom chipset, Tensor, and is expected to offer high refresh rate displays, 33 W charging, UWB, and 50 MP cameras. Pricing specifics remain unknown but the Pixel 6 Pro is expected to carry a hefty price tag in line with its premium hardware.

Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro tipped for September 13 global launch

Jon Rettinger 29 August, 2021 - 12:00am

According to information coming out of China, Google plans to launch the Pixel 6 series globally on September 13. It's a bit amusing that this leak is coming from a Chinese source, as Google generally doesn't even sell its phones in that market. It does sell its phones in Taiwan, however, and the source has a solid track record with leaks.

The Pixel 6 series will be powered by Google's semi-custom chipset, Tensor, and is expected to offer high refresh rate displays, 33 W charging, UWB, and 50 MP cameras. Pricing specifics remain unknown but the Pixel 6 Pro is expected to carry a hefty price tag in line with its premium hardware.

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