Hands on: Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 Classic review

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TechRadar 12 August, 2021 - 05:19am 33 views

Does Galaxy Watch 4 have Google assistant?

The Galaxy Watch 4 is the first smartwatch to run the new Wear OS powered by Samsung. It has access to new experiences from Google, such as a revamped Google Maps and Google Pay, and will eventually have access to Google Assistant for the best in AI. Android CentralThe Galaxy Watch 4 won't have Google Assistant at launch, but there's hope

Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 4 might finally get us to use the always-on display

Techradar 12 August, 2021 - 06:40pm

Finally, turn on the always-on display

If you haven’t seen the news, it’s because the tech giant just unveiled the new Exynos W920 chip – its first 5nm processor designed for wearables, packing in a lot of power in truly compact chipset. While there’s a chance this announcement could be too late for its 2021 line of products, we’d be surprised if Samsung unveiled a new chip the day before announcing its smartwatches will use a less powerful option.

While performance improvements are expected, we’re more interested in what the Exynos W2920 could mean for always-on displays in Samsung wearables. Based on what Samsung has said so far, there’s a chance we might finally use the feature that’s been known to tear through your battery life.

Always-on displays aren’t new, and they’re exactly what they sound like. The device’s screen never turns off, and always displays basic information like time or notifications so you don’t have to wake up your device unnecessarily. While some have billed it as a battery saving feature, we’ve found that it can cause a serious hit to your device’s battery life (as with the original Samsung Galaxy Watch).

The W920 is actually two processors in one, with a CPU that boasts a 20% performance boost over the previous generation and another that is dedicated to operating the low power display. In theory this should reduce the power consumption required to operate the always-on display while not reducing its usefulness, though we’ll have to wait and see until we can get our hands on it.

Extending battery life is particularly important for wearable tech, as their smaller form factor limits the largest battery size more so than in other devices like smartphones. If this Exynos W920 chip can deliver on its promise of a low-power always-on display, the Galaxy Watch 4 might be the first smartwatch where we actually recommend using the feature.

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The new Galaxy Watch 4 launches with Wear OS 'Powered by Samsung'

Android Central 11 August, 2021 - 09:00am

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After a couple of glimpses into the unified Wear OS update, Samsung has finally launched the Galaxy Watch 4. It's the first smartwatch to feature the new Wear OS "Powered by Samsung" and marks the company's transition back to Google's wearable platform.

Thanks to the new customization options, the Galaxy Watch 4 features Samsung's One UI Watch on top of Wear OS. This creates a seamless experience between Samsung smartphones like the new Galaxy Z Flip 3 and the smartwatch. For example, when an app is downloaded onto the smartphone, the compatible app will automatically download onto the watch.

Settings will also sync between devices, and the Galaxy Watch 4 can be used to control other devices using gestures or Bixby. It's also compatible with Auto Switch, so audio will automatically toggle between devices based on usage.

Of course, because it's Wear OS, Google highlights how you'll find plenty of its services present on the watch, such as Google Maps, Google Pay, Messages, and more.

The Galaxy Watch 4 comes in two styles, standard and "Classic," the latter of which features a physical rotating bezel for easy navigation. Both styles feature 1.19-inch or 1.36-inch AMOLED displays, depending on the case size, and are protected with Gorilla Glass DX+.

Samsung's enhanced BioActive sensor powers the watch's heart rate and ECG monitor, as well as a new Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) sensor, which can help measure body composition. Samsung says the new BIA sensor "gives users a deeper understanding of their general health and fitness, with key measurements like skeletal muscle mass, basal metabolic rate, body water and body fat percentage." Measurements can be taken in just 15 seconds using two fingers.

Powering the smartwatch is Samsung's new Exynos W920, a 5nm chipset that offers a major boost in performance thanks to its more efficient process node. This should make Wear OS run even more smoothly when compared to smartwatches powered by the already impressive 12nm Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 4100.

There's also 1.5GB of RAM and a whopping 16GB of storage for apps, music, and photos, twice the amount of storage found on any of the best Wear OS watches. The watch also offers decent battery life, with up to 40 hours on a single charge, depending on usage. Samsung says you only need a 30-minute charge to get up to 10 hours of battery life.

The new Galaxy Watch 4 will come in 40mm and 44mm case sizes with Bluetooth and LTE (eSIM) models starting at $250 and $300, respectively. The Galaxy Watch 4 Classic will come in 42mm and 46mm case sizes, and connectivity options will start at $350 and $400, respectively. Larger sizes for both models will increase the price by just $30.

Preorders start today, and the watch will be in stores starting August 27.

The Galaxy Watch 4 is the first smartwatch to run the new Wear OS powered by Samsung. Thanks to its powerful new chip, Samsung's new wearable can take Wear OS to the next level with new seamless integration and better app experiences.

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It's hard to deny the allure of Samsung's first watch with the new, merged Wear OS system, especially at these prices. But before you pull the strap on your own, we first need to decide which Galaxy Watch 4 color deserves to live on your wrist.

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Samsung's New Wear OS Galaxy Watch 4 Ushers In a New Era for Android

Gizmodo 11 August, 2021 - 09:00am

Visually speaking, the Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic aren’t rocking the boat. They look like tweaked versions of their predecessors, the Galaxy Watch Active 2 and the Galaxy Watch 3. (For clarity, Samsung has also updated the branding so that its previous Active line is now the Galaxy Watch, while the premium Galaxy Watch line is now dubbed the Classic.) The Watch 4 comes in both 40mm and 44mm sizes, while the Classic is slightly larger at 42mm and 46mm. The former retains the Active’s digital bezel, while the Classic sports Samsung’s iconic physical rotating bezel.

More important are the upgrades under the hood. First off, these babies are packing the new Exynos W920, which Samsung says is the industry’s first 5nm wearable chip. This is a huge deal for Wear OS smartwatches, as up until now they’ve been tottering along on Qualcomm’s ancient 28nm Snapdragon Wear chips. Samsung says this translates to a 20% faster CPU, 50% more RAM, and a GPU that’s 10 times faster than its previous chip. That also makes these the beefiest Wear OS watches you can get right now, with 1.5GB of RAM and 16GB of storage. All this extra processing power is immediately noticeable. Animations are smooth, apps launch quickly, and scrolling through your widgets is a breeze. I didn’t get to try the watches’ LTE connectivity, but you do have that option for each watch.

The other big hardware upgrade is the BioActive Sensor, a 3-in-1 chip that enables optical heart rate-monitoring, ECGs, and bioelectrical impedance analysis for body composition. Samsung says the sensor fits into a more compact design without sacrificing accuracy. I can’t say whether that bears out for activity-tracking or ECGs just yet, but heart rate seemed on par with my Apple Watch SE.

First off, the Wear OS running on the Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic is “Wear OS Powered by Samsung.” The Wear OS that will come to other watches next year is Wear OS 3. Ultimately, all that means is the Wear OS running on these smartwatches has a bit more Samsung flavor.

Most of that is the One UI Watch experience Samsung detailed earlier this year at Mobile World Congress. The gist is that when paired with a Galaxy smartphone, Samsung’s watches will automatically download apps from your phone, sync important settings, and switch audio between different Samsung devices. This is more of a passive feature, however, and I didn’t really get a chance to see it in action first-hand.

The Samsung Health app has also gotten a refresh. The app itself looks much cleaner, is easier to navigate, and presents metrics in a more straightforward way. There’s also a new dedicated tab for guided workouts, which you can stream to Samsung TVs with real-time metrics from your watch.

It’s not all Samsung though. Google also said today that the apps would reflect the new Material You design language for Google Maps, Messages by Google, Google Pay apps, and YouTube Music, whenever that launches later this year. And as promised at Google I/O, there’ll be more third-party apps and Tiles, including Calm, Komoot, MyFitnessPal, Period Tracker, Sleep Cycle, Spotify, Strava, and Adidas Running. (Everything but Google Maps will also be coming in the next few weeks to Wear OS 2.)

Futzing with a few features and menu screens is far from a comprehensive test of the new Wear OS. I can’t deliver a final verdict on that alone. However, what I saw and experienced so far is extremely promising. We’ll have a more in-depth review soon, so stay tuned.

Both watches are available for pre-order starting today and are expected to ship on Aug. 27. If you preorder before then, you’ll also get a $50 Samsung credit.

The Galaxy Watch 4 starts at $250, with the LTE version costing $300. The 40mm version will be available in black, silver, and pink gold. The 44mm version is available in black, silver, and green.

The Galaxy Watch 4 Classic is $350 for Bluetooth only and $400 for LTE. You’re a little more limited in terms of colors, however. At launch, the watch will come in black and silver. If you’re willing to wait until September, however, you can also opt for a rhodium-plated Thom Browne limited edition.

Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 4 turns the clock back to take on the Apple Watch

British GQ 11 August, 2021 - 09:00am

During that time, Samsung has cut features and added new ones. It’s tweaked the look, added more size options and even changed the name. Its efforts have gradually gotten better, but clearly not enough to knock Apple off its lofty perch.

Present at the beginning of Google’s smartwatch journey before setting out on its own path, Samsung has now sought out an old friend in Google to team up for its new Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic smartwatches, in what feels like last chance saloon territory. While these new watches still resemble Samsung’s previous efforts, it’s clear that things have changed the second you swipe your fingers across their displays.

Before tucking into the finer details of Samsung and Google’s reunion, let’s go over the basics. Samsung is offering two round-faced options, both with promising slimmer looks, beefier processing power and higher-quality displays compared to their predecessors. The standard Watch 4 replaces the outgoing Watch Active 2 and comes in 40mm and 44mm sizes. Like the Active, it uses a digital bezel, letting you slide your fingers around the edge of the display to scroll through screens.

The headline news here, though, is the newly forged Google partnership, which brings in features from its Wear OS smartwatch platform, plugging gaps (read: apps) in Samsung’s own offering. Now, thanks to this rekindled relationship, you’ll be able to shop in Google’s own storefront and make use of its own rebuilt apps such as Google Maps and Pay. This means you’ll also eventually be able to ditch Samsung’s own Bixby voice assistant for Google’s, if you prefer.

You’re still getting access to Samsung features here too, such as taking control of your smart home lighting, and you can now control Samsung’s new Galaxy Buds from the Watch as well. While Google’s software is present, the Watch 4 will still feel like you’re using a Samsung smartwatch and that’s down to the presence of its One UI Watch interface, which sits on top of Google’s software.

These changes mean that Samsung is bringing a more unified feel across its phones and watches and not just in appearance – it also affects how the two devices work in tandem. Set up “Do Not Disturb” mode on your phone when you go to bed, for example, and the same settings will automatically be applied on your watch.

A new BioActive sensor is another addition, equipped to take your blood pressure, record clinical grade-style heart-rate readings and analyse body composition just like a set of smart scales. In other words, if you want to keep tabs on your body fat and BMI, the Watch 4 has you covered.

Like the Samsung smartwatches that have come before it, LTE connectivity means the Watch 4 can standalone without needing to lean on your phone to check your Twitter mentions, make a call or stream music from apps such as Spotify. With just around a day and half of promised battery life, though, it’s one where you’re going to need that charger close by.

Samsung has played around with smartwatches more than most tech companies. Getting to something more aesthetically pleasing has taken a while, but it looks like the formula has been cracked. With Google now in the equation to get its software up to scratch, Samsung is edging closer to offering a more complete smartwatch package. Only time will tell, though, if it was the right move to jump back into bed with Google.

The Samsung Galaxy Watch start at £259 for the Watch 4 and £369 for the Watch 4 Classic. samsung.com

Samsung’s Galaxy Watch 4 turns the clock back to take on the Apple Watch

Engadget 11 August, 2021 - 09:00am

During that time, Samsung has cut features and added new ones. It’s tweaked the look, added more size options and even changed the name. Its efforts have gradually gotten better, but clearly not enough to knock Apple off its lofty perch.

Present at the beginning of Google’s smartwatch journey before setting out on its own path, Samsung has now sought out an old friend in Google to team up for its new Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic smartwatches, in what feels like last chance saloon territory. While these new watches still resemble Samsung’s previous efforts, it’s clear that things have changed the second you swipe your fingers across their displays.

Before tucking into the finer details of Samsung and Google’s reunion, let’s go over the basics. Samsung is offering two round-faced options, both with promising slimmer looks, beefier processing power and higher-quality displays compared to their predecessors. The standard Watch 4 replaces the outgoing Watch Active 2 and comes in 40mm and 44mm sizes. Like the Active, it uses a digital bezel, letting you slide your fingers around the edge of the display to scroll through screens.

The headline news here, though, is the newly forged Google partnership, which brings in features from its Wear OS smartwatch platform, plugging gaps (read: apps) in Samsung’s own offering. Now, thanks to this rekindled relationship, you’ll be able to shop in Google’s own storefront and make use of its own rebuilt apps such as Google Maps and Pay. This means you’ll also eventually be able to ditch Samsung’s own Bixby voice assistant for Google’s, if you prefer.

You’re still getting access to Samsung features here too, such as taking control of your smart home lighting, and you can now control Samsung’s new Galaxy Buds from the Watch as well. While Google’s software is present, the Watch 4 will still feel like you’re using a Samsung smartwatch and that’s down to the presence of its One UI Watch interface, which sits on top of Google’s software.

These changes mean that Samsung is bringing a more unified feel across its phones and watches and not just in appearance – it also affects how the two devices work in tandem. Set up “Do Not Disturb” mode on your phone when you go to bed, for example, and the same settings will automatically be applied on your watch.

A new BioActive sensor is another addition, equipped to take your blood pressure, record clinical grade-style heart-rate readings and analyse body composition just like a set of smart scales. In other words, if you want to keep tabs on your body fat and BMI, the Watch 4 has you covered.

Like the Samsung smartwatches that have come before it, LTE connectivity means the Watch 4 can standalone without needing to lean on your phone to check your Twitter mentions, make a call or stream music from apps such as Spotify. With just around a day and half of promised battery life, though, it’s one where you’re going to need that charger close by.

Samsung has played around with smartwatches more than most tech companies. Getting to something more aesthetically pleasing has taken a while, but it looks like the formula has been cracked. With Google now in the equation to get its software up to scratch, Samsung is edging closer to offering a more complete smartwatch package. Only time will tell, though, if it was the right move to jump back into bed with Google.

The Samsung Galaxy Watch start at £259 for the Watch 4 and £369 for the Watch 4 Classic. samsung.com

Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic launched

XDA Developers 11 August, 2021 - 05:00am

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The recently concluded Google I/O marked a new beginning for Google’s Wear OS platform. Google announced they would be partnering with Samsung to give Wear OS a much-needed overhaul. A couple of months later, we now have the first smartwatch(es) running the newest version of Wear OS, albeit with Samsung’s layer of One UI on top — the Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic. Both these smartwatches have been launched alongside the Galaxy Z Fold 3, Galaxy Z Flip 3, and the Galaxy Buds 2 at Samsung’s Unpacked event.

The Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic are both premium smartwatches that come with some pretty attractive features. Both the watches use Samsung’s latest Exynos W920 chipset based on the 5nm manufacturing process. This chipset should be able to provide both performance gains as well as improving battery life. The display on the watches is also high-res and you get two size options to choose from based on the size of your wrist.

There are two major highlights of the Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic this year, the first one being Samsung’s BioActive Sensor. It basically integrates all the essential sensors you would find on a smartwatch like optical heart rate, electrical heart rate, and bioelectrical impedance analysis sensor. It also brings the first-ever body composition measurement on a smartwatch that can help you measure parameters like skeletal muscle, fat mass, BMI, body water, etc.

The second highlight of both watches is the new One UI Watch. It’s Samsung’s new smartwatch platform built with Google that replaces Tizen. One UI Watch is based on Wear OS, so it will allow users to install Samsung as well as Google apps. First-party Google apps like Maps will now work seamlessly along with third-party apps like Strava, Spotify, etc. Google has also redesigned several of its smartwatch apps, and they debut on the Watch 4 series.

Both watches have 1.5GB of RAM and 16GB of onboard storage. Samsung promises up to 40 hours of battery life on a single charge, but that’s something we’ll know only once we use it. Samsung will also offer LTE connectivity in some regions. The Galaxy Watch 4 replaces the Galaxy Watch Active 2, and the Watch 4 Classic is for users looking for a smartwatch that resembles a traditional timepiece.

The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 will start at a price of $249.99 for the 40mm variant while the Galaxy Watch 4 Classic is $50 more and will start at $349.99 for the 42mm variant. Both watches will be available to purchase starting August 27th from Samsung’s website. There will also be a limited Thom Browne edition of the watch available for purchase. Check out the table below for complete pricing details for all the variants.

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Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic launched

CNET 11 August, 2021 - 05:00am

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The recently concluded Google I/O marked a new beginning for Google’s Wear OS platform. Google announced they would be partnering with Samsung to give Wear OS a much-needed overhaul. A couple of months later, we now have the first smartwatch(es) running the newest version of Wear OS, albeit with Samsung’s layer of One UI on top — the Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic. Both these smartwatches have been launched alongside the Galaxy Z Fold 3, Galaxy Z Flip 3, and the Galaxy Buds 2 at Samsung’s Unpacked event.

The Galaxy Watch 4 and Galaxy Watch 4 Classic are both premium smartwatches that come with some pretty attractive features. Both the watches use Samsung’s latest Exynos W920 chipset based on the 5nm manufacturing process. This chipset should be able to provide both performance gains as well as improving battery life. The display on the watches is also high-res and you get two size options to choose from based on the size of your wrist.

There are two major highlights of the Galaxy Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic this year, the first one being Samsung’s BioActive Sensor. It basically integrates all the essential sensors you would find on a smartwatch like optical heart rate, electrical heart rate, and bioelectrical impedance analysis sensor. It also brings the first-ever body composition measurement on a smartwatch that can help you measure parameters like skeletal muscle, fat mass, BMI, body water, etc.

The second highlight of both watches is the new One UI Watch. It’s Samsung’s new smartwatch platform built with Google that replaces Tizen. One UI Watch is based on Wear OS, so it will allow users to install Samsung as well as Google apps. First-party Google apps like Maps will now work seamlessly along with third-party apps like Strava, Spotify, etc. Google has also redesigned several of its smartwatch apps, and they debut on the Watch 4 series.

Both watches have 1.5GB of RAM and 16GB of onboard storage. Samsung promises up to 40 hours of battery life on a single charge, but that’s something we’ll know only once we use it. Samsung will also offer LTE connectivity in some regions. The Galaxy Watch 4 replaces the Galaxy Watch Active 2, and the Watch 4 Classic is for users looking for a smartwatch that resembles a traditional timepiece.

The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 will start at a price of $249.99 for the 40mm variant while the Galaxy Watch 4 Classic is $50 more and will start at $349.99 for the 42mm variant. Both watches will be available to purchase starting August 27th from Samsung’s website. There will also be a limited Thom Browne edition of the watch available for purchase. Check out the table below for complete pricing details for all the variants.

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XDA Developers was founded by developers, for developers. It is now a valuable resource for people who want to make the most of their mobile devices, from customizing the look and feel to adding new functionality.

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