Harris English hits hole-in-one at the Tour Championship

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Fox News 03 September, 2021 - 06:19am 16 views

Where is the Tour Championship played?

The 2021 PGA Tour playoffs end this week with the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta. The top 30 players in the Fed Ex Cup points standings are in the field and will compete for the first-place prize of $15 million. Dustin Johnson is the defending champion FedEx Cup champion. Sports Illustrated2021 Tour Championship: Purse, Prize Money, FedEx Cup Payouts at East Lake

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Harris English, the world’s no. 11 ranked player on tour, walked up to a monstrous 223-yard hole-15 with his eyes likely on a par because it’s the tournament’s toughest hole — he walked away with an ace at The Tour Championship. We suck at golf.

This hole was a bogey machine all day and this swing ended up bringing English to six under and sliding him into the top-5. A huge swing that had no business happening. Regardless, we’re glad it did, even though we all wish it were us instead.

And don’t forget the winner of this tournament takes home $15 million. Splashing down a shot from 200 yards is a start.

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Bryson DeChambeau breaks silence on the Brooks Koepka drama

New York Post 03 September, 2021 - 01:21pm

It’s bigger than Bryson DeChambeau, says Bryson DeChambeau.

In a sit-down interview with NBC Sports ahead of The Tour Championship, the golfer broke his silence on his Brooks Koepka rivalry and the fan taunting that has been following him because of the feud.

“I can take heat, I’ve taken heat my whole entire life,” said the 27-year-old DeChambeau, who, outside of brief on-course interviews with the network covering the events, has been ducking the media for weeks.

“It’s because I am a little different. I understand that and I appreciate that. Whether you are Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, there’s always going to be heat. I understand that and respect that.”

Instead, DeChambeau said his issue with fans screaming “Brooksie” at him comes down to the future of the sport and the impact fans can have on players as betting becomes legal and more mainstream around the country.

ESPN.com reported that DeChambeau erupted at a Koepka fan after losing the BMW Championship in a playoff on Sunday. The PGA Tour announced on Tuesday that any fan taunting DeChambeau with the “Brooksie” chant will be subject to expulsion.

“It’s another variable that I have to take account for, but guess what? I am going to do my best to treat people the way they want to be treated and absolutely give all my heart on the playing field,” DeChambeau said.

A majority of DeChambeau’s issues with fans stem from his Koepka feud, which started years ago but has escalated to new levels this season.

“I really don’t have an issue with him,” DeChambeau said of the popular Koepka. “The crowds are going to say what they are going to say because they have a right to do so. And it’s been going on for months now, everyone has their own tipping points. I’ve done a pretty good job of letting that fuel me in a positive way.”

The two will go from rivals to teammates at the Ryder Cup later this month. American captain Steve Stricker has said that the two have agreed to a temporary truce in the name of beating the Europeans at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin.

“Personally, I am 100-percent willing to do that. I think highly of him,” DeChambeau said. “He’s done a lot for the sport. He’s an interesting character who can be an amazing asset to the team. I can be an amazing asset to the team and if we all focus on being the best we can possibly be we will win.”

2021 Tour Championship live coverage: How to watch Round 2 on Friday

Golf.com 03 September, 2021 - 05:55am

Patrick Cantlay maintained his FedEx Cup lead in Round 1 at the 2021 Tour Championship.

The 2021 Tour Championship continues on Friday at East Lake, where the best players in the game are jostling for position. Here’s what you need to know to watch the second-round action on TV or online.

Patrick Cantlay is one step closer to being $15 million richer. The pre-tournament FedEx Cup leader showed little nerves on his way to an opening-round 67 on Thursday at East Lake. That moved him to 13 under, but his lead did not grow, despite playing partner Tony Finau’s struggles. World No. 1 Jon Rahm charged up the leaderboard with a 65, moving into second place at 11 under.

But Rahm isn’t the only challenger Cantlay has to worry about. Bryson DeChambeau had an up-and-down round that left him tied with Harris English for third place at eight under.

Below you will find everything you need to watch the second round of the 2021 Tour Championship on Friday.

Golf Channel will air the second round of the 2021 Tour Championship with five hours of coverage from 1-6 p.m. ET on Friday.

You can stream the second round Golf Channel TV coverage of the Tour Championship on golfchannel.com. Fans can also view Featured Group coverage of the second round all day Friday via PGA Tour Live with a subscription.

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As managing producer for GOLF.com, Cunningham edits, writes and publishes stories on GOLF.com, and manages the brand’s e-newsletters, which reach more than 1.4 million subscribers each month. A former two-time intern, he also helps keep GOLF.com humming outside the news-breaking stories and service content provided by our reporters and writers, and works with the tech team in the development of new products and innovative ways to deliver an engaging site to our audience.

GOLF.com and GOLF Magazine are published by EB GOLF MEDIA LLC, a division of 8AM GOLF

Cantlay starts on top, keeps distance at East Lake

CBSSports.com 02 September, 2021 - 06:50pm

No teams in your favorites yet.

ATLANTA -- Patrick Cantlay met his goal in the first round of the Tour Championship on Thursday, and it had nothing to do with the score on his card or the size of his lead.

As the top seed in the FedEx Cup, he started with a 2-shot lead over Tony Finau before even hitting a shot. He finished the warm, breezy day at East Lake at 3-under 67 with a 2-shot lead over Jon Rahm.

This was all about playing another tournament round.

"I think being in the spot that I'm in, it would be easy to get ahead of yourself and easy to maybe stray from your game plan because you feel like you're ahead," Cantlay said. "And that's just not helpful, so I'm not going to do that."

Only four players had a better score, so it was a good day regardless of the format that allows players to start at various points under par depending on their FedEx Cup positions.

Rahm began by chipping in for birdie, kept the round from getting away from him with a few key saves -- one for bogey, one for par -- at the turn, and ran off four birdies over his last seven holes for a 65.

Cantlay, who started at 10 under par, moved to 13 under.

Five shots behind were Bryson DeChambeau and Harris English, and only one of them managed to pick up a little ground on Cantlay while delivering one of the more exciting moments.

That would be English, who was headed in the wrong direction when he stepped to the tee at the par-3 15th over water -- the second-toughest hole at East Lake -- smashed a 5-iron from 224 yards and watched it drop for a hole-in-one, the first one since the Tour Championship first came to East Lake in 1998.

He followed with two more birdies for a 66, one better than Cantlay on the day, a little closer than when English started.

DeChambeau birdied his last three holes to salvage a 69. He started 3 shots behind and now is 5 shots behind, without any reports of unruly behavior outside the ropes.

The subject of name calling was -- who else? -- English.

One fan following along kept referring to him by another name -- Hudson Swafford -- which is understandable. English and Swafford were teammates at Georgia, have similar builds, look a little alike. They're even tied in driving distance (81st) on the PGA Tour.

"He thought I was Hudson like half the people out here," English said. "I think he kind of had a couple beers. ... He just couldn't quite tell from 50 yards out who I was."

Finau, meanwhile, had a 72 and went from 2 shots behind to 7 back.

This is the third year of the format, and Cantlay doesn't know how the lower half feels. He was the No. 2 seed in 2019 when it started, the No. 1 seed last year. That first time didn't go well. He had one of his worst weeks of the year, which cost him nearly $2 million with how far he fell.

Justin Thomas was the Nos. 1 and 3 seeds the previous two times. Now he's at No. 6, meaning he started 6 shots out of the lead. That was a new experience.

He noticed he already was in 10th place by the time he teed off, based on some early scoring, and found that to be a bit jarring. Worse yet was being 1 over on the front nine. Starting out 6 shots behind in the first place, his hopes could have ended early.

But he shot 31 on the back nine, had five birdies and one impressive par save on the 14th, and pieced together a 67. He's still 6 back. It could have been worse.

"When you start behind like that, unfortunately, you just don't have the luxury of shooting a 1 over or 2 over the first round," Thomas said. "And I salvaged a good round out there and feel like I can easily go out there and shoot 6 or 7 under one of these next three days. And hopefully I do."

Rahm started 4 back and, like Cantlay, chose not to pay attention to anything but the next shot, even as the good start looked as though it could get away from him. He took bogey from the left rough on No. 7, had to get up-and-down from behind the eighth green for bogey and saved par from a bunker on the par-3 ninth.

That was as important as some of his birdies. Now he's 2 behind Cantlay with 54 holes left, and no matter how odd it might seem at the start, now it feels like a regular tournament.

"It's very easy to get caught up on how far back you start. I don't think I really once thought about it out there. I was just trying to post a score," Rahm said. "My job is to hit the best shot I can each time and that's all can I control."

Cantlay starts on top, keeps distance at East Lake

pgatour.com 02 September, 2021 - 06:50pm

No teams in your favorites yet.

ATLANTA -- Patrick Cantlay met his goal in the first round of the Tour Championship on Thursday, and it had nothing to do with the score on his card or the size of his lead.

As the top seed in the FedEx Cup, he started with a 2-shot lead over Tony Finau before even hitting a shot. He finished the warm, breezy day at East Lake at 3-under 67 with a 2-shot lead over Jon Rahm.

This was all about playing another tournament round.

"I think being in the spot that I'm in, it would be easy to get ahead of yourself and easy to maybe stray from your game plan because you feel like you're ahead," Cantlay said. "And that's just not helpful, so I'm not going to do that."

Only four players had a better score, so it was a good day regardless of the format that allows players to start at various points under par depending on their FedEx Cup positions.

Rahm began by chipping in for birdie, kept the round from getting away from him with a few key saves -- one for bogey, one for par -- at the turn, and ran off four birdies over his last seven holes for a 65.

Cantlay, who started at 10 under par, moved to 13 under.

Five shots behind were Bryson DeChambeau and Harris English, and only one of them managed to pick up a little ground on Cantlay while delivering one of the more exciting moments.

That would be English, who was headed in the wrong direction when he stepped to the tee at the par-3 15th over water -- the second-toughest hole at East Lake -- smashed a 5-iron from 224 yards and watched it drop for a hole-in-one, the first one since the Tour Championship first came to East Lake in 1998.

He followed with two more birdies for a 66, one better than Cantlay on the day, a little closer than when English started.

DeChambeau birdied his last three holes to salvage a 69. He started 3 shots behind and now is 5 shots behind, without any reports of unruly behavior outside the ropes.

The subject of name calling was -- who else? -- English.

One fan following along kept referring to him by another name -- Hudson Swafford -- which is understandable. English and Swafford were teammates at Georgia, have similar builds, look a little alike. They're even tied in driving distance (81st) on the PGA Tour.

"He thought I was Hudson like half the people out here," English said. "I think he kind of had a couple beers. ... He just couldn't quite tell from 50 yards out who I was."

Finau, meanwhile, had a 72 and went from 2 shots behind to 7 back.

This is the third year of the format, and Cantlay doesn't know how the lower half feels. He was the No. 2 seed in 2019 when it started, the No. 1 seed last year. That first time didn't go well. He had one of his worst weeks of the year, which cost him nearly $2 million with how far he fell.

Justin Thomas was the Nos. 1 and 3 seeds the previous two times. Now he's at No. 6, meaning he started 6 shots out of the lead. That was a new experience.

He noticed he already was in 10th place by the time he teed off, based on some early scoring, and found that to be a bit jarring. Worse yet was being 1 over on the front nine. Starting out 6 shots behind in the first place, his hopes could have ended early.

But he shot 31 on the back nine, had five birdies and one impressive par save on the 14th, and pieced together a 67. He's still 6 back. It could have been worse.

"When you start behind like that, unfortunately, you just don't have the luxury of shooting a 1 over or 2 over the first round," Thomas said. "And I salvaged a good round out there and feel like I can easily go out there and shoot 6 or 7 under one of these next three days. And hopefully I do."

Rahm started 4 back and, like Cantlay, chose not to pay attention to anything but the next shot, even as the good start looked as though it could get away from him. He took bogey from the left rough on No. 7, had to get up-and-down from behind the eighth green for bogey and saved par from a bunker on the par-3 ninth.

That was as important as some of his birdies. Now he's 2 behind Cantlay with 54 holes left, and no matter how odd it might seem at the start, now it feels like a regular tournament.

"It's very easy to get caught up on how far back you start. I don't think I really once thought about it out there. I was just trying to post a score," Rahm said. "My job is to hit the best shot I can each time and that's all can I control."

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