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BBC News 28 June, 2021 - 04:49pm 36 views

Does eating chocolate in the morning help you lose weight?

Eating chocolate in the morning may help burn body fat, decrease glucose levels, and improved microbiome health, thanks to the flavanol content, according to a new study. Food timing is a relevant factor in weight control. NutraIngredients.comStudy reports health benefits of morning chocolate

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Calling all chocoholics! In addition to the antioxidants and other health benefits of eating chocolate, a new study suggests that a particular type of chocolate may actually help you slim down, along with when you eat it. And, if you think you've guessed which type of chocolate these scientists are shouting out, then so much about these findings is likely to blow your mind.

Check out the chocolate that researchers found to support weight loss efforts, and read One Major Effect Coffee Has on Your Metabolism, Expert Says.

A study at Brigham and Women's Hospital published this week in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology set out to examine whether eating 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of chocolate at different times of day affected metabolism in postmenopausal women.

To start, 19 women were divided into three groups: one group ate chocolate in the morning, while another ate at night. The third group ate no chocolate at all. Otherwise, the participants weren't required to change their usual diet habits. This experiment was carried out for 14 days.

One key factor? The choice in chocolate. The researcher state that dark chocolate is often credited with its health effects. For that reason, these researchers opted to see what happened by administering milk chocolate.

The first observation the researchers state in their abstract is: "Our results show that 14 days of chocolate intake did not increase body weight." If you think that's compelling in and of itself, just keep reading…

RELATED: This Simple Walking Workout Is an Amazing Fat Burner, Says Top Trainer

Both morning and evening chocolate-eating groups of women saw decreased hunger and fewer sweets cravings over the 14-day study.

RELATED: Side Effects of Giving Up Chocolate, According to Science

Both the morning and nighttime chocolate eaters burned increased calories than a baseline measure, but the nighttime group burned twice the calories (300 on average) than the morning group's average 150. Further, the nighttime chocolate eaters experienced an increase in physical activity of 6.9 percent, increased metabolism, and even a reduction in waist circumference by 1.7 percent. Their sleeping rhythms are also said to have been more regular. Why? The reason is very scientific—read to find out.

The researchers explain that eating chocolate seemed to alter "the composition and function" of microbiota in the gut, which they believe played an important part in the hunger, activity, and metabolic shifts for the participants.

RELATED: The Secret to Avoiding Obesity May Lie in Your Gut, Says New Study

There's a key caveat to point out before you incorporate this amount of chocolate into your everyday diet: While the consumption of chocolate seemed to increase women's calories burned in this study, the calories in the chocolate, about 542, significantly outweighed the increase in calories burned. So, while it may be worth eating more chocolate to see how this serves you, opting for a whole 3.5 ounces might be a little excessive on the regular.

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They're low on sugar, but high on flavor.

You can actually eat more and still lose weight.

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Read full article at BBC News

Eating This Type of Chocolate May Burn More Fat, New Study Says

msnNOW 29 June, 2021 - 04:24am

Calling all chocoholics! In addition to the antioxidants and other health benefits of eating chocolate, a new study suggests that a particular type of chocolate may actually help you slim down, along with when you eat it. And, if you think you've guessed which type of chocolate these scientists are shouting out, then so much about these findings is likely to blow your mind.

Check out the chocolate that researchers found to support weight loss efforts, and read One Major Effect Coffee Has on Your Metabolism, Expert Says(Read this original article on Eat This, Not That!)

A study at Brigham and Women's Hospital published this week in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology set out to examine whether eating 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of chocolate at different times of day affected metabolism in postmenopausal women.

To start, 19 women were divided into three groups: one group ate chocolate in the morning, while another ate at night. The third group ate no chocolate at all. Otherwise, the participants weren't required to change their usual diet habits. This experiment was carried out for 14 days.

One key factor? The choice in chocolate. The researcher state that dark chocolate is often credited with its health effects. For that reason, these researchers opted to see what happened by administering milk chocolate.

The first observation the researchers state in their abstract is: "Our results show that 14 days of chocolate intake did not increase body weight." If you think that's compelling in and of itself, just keep reading…

RELATED: This Simple Walking Workout Is an Amazing Fat Burner, Says Top Trainer

Both morning and evening chocolate-eating groups of women saw decreased hunger and fewer sweets cravings over the 14-day study.

RELATED: Side Effects of Giving Up Chocolate, According to Science

Both the morning and nighttime chocolate eaters burned increased calories than a baseline measure, but the nighttime group burned twice the calories (300 on average) than the morning group's average 150. Further, the nighttime chocolate eaters experienced an increase in physical activity of 6.9 percent, increased metabolism, and even a reduction in waist circumference by 1.7 percent. Their sleeping rhythms are also said to have been more regular. Why? The reason is very scientific—read to find out.

The researchers explain that eating chocolate seemed to alter "the composition and function" of microbiota in the gut, which they believe played an important part in the hunger, activity, and metabolic shifts for the participants.

RELATED: The Secret to Avoiding Obesity May Lie in Your Gut, Says New Study

There's a key caveat to point out before you incorporate this amount of chocolate into your everyday diet: While the consumption of chocolate seemed to increase women's calories burned in this study, the calories in the chocolate, about 542, significantly outweighed the increase in calories burned. So, while it may be worth eating more chocolate to see how this serves you, opting for a whole 3.5 ounces might be a little excessive on the regular.

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Eating chocolate for breakfast could help you lose weight, new study finds

indy100 29 June, 2021 - 04:24am

Every sweet-tooth’s dream could be about to come true thanks to a new study on the health benefits of chocolate.

It turns out eating the treat as your first meal of the day could help you burn fat, according to researchers in the US.

The team at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston gave 100g of milk chocolate to 19 post-menopausal women within an hour of waking up, or one hour before they went to sleep, every day for two weeks.

Rather than pile on the pounds as you might expect, they found that a high intake of chocolate during the morning hours could help burn fat and reduce blood glucose levels.

Meanwhile, consuming it at night helped regulate participants’ sleeping patterns and alter their metabolism.

“Our findings highlight that not only ‘what’ but also ‘when’ we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight,” said Harvard Medical School professor Frank AJL Scheer who helped lead the study.

“Our volunteers did not gain weight despite increasing caloric intake,” added co-author Marta Garaulet of Brigham hospital.

During the 14-day trial, participants were allowed to eat “any other foods” and not restricted to a particular diet.

Scheer explained that he and his colleagues “hypothesised that having a high-energy and high-sugar food such as chocolate during a short-term period of two weeks” may affect energy balance, weight distribution, and the bacteria in the gut.

Indeed, their findings suggest that chocolate consumption can decrease hunger and the desire for sweets and reduce energy intake.

In addition, daily levels of the stress hormone cortisol were lower when eating chocolate in the morning.

Key to the medicinal properties of chocolate are the chemicals in cocoa called flavanols. They supposedly increase fat oxidation and have been linked to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke and death from cardiovascular disease.

That said, don’t get too excited.

Before you go reaching for the Dairy Milk at 7am tomorrow, remember the old mantra: “Everything in moderation.”

Eating Chocolate In Morning Could Be Good For You, New Study Finds

LADbible 29 June, 2021 - 04:24am

According to a recent study, eating milk chocolate for your first meal of the day can provide some unexpected side effects - such as helping your body burn fat.

Instead, results found the chocolate intake made no difference in the participants' weight and actually aided weight loss.

The study suggested that eating chocolate in the morning can actually help burn fat and reduce glucose levels in the blood.

To get technical about it, the reason behind this may be down to the chemicals in cocoa, which chocolate is made out of. Called flavanols, they supposedly increase fat oxidation.

Eating the chocolate at night, meanwhile, helped the test's subjects to regulate sleeping patterns and alter metabolism.

During the trial, participants weren't restricted on what else they ate alongside their milk chocolate diet.

Frank A.J.L. Scheer, a neuroscientist with the division of sleep and circadian disorders, said: "Having chocolate in the morning or the evening/night results in differential effects on hunger and appetite, substrate oxidation, fasting glucose, microbiota (composition and function), and sleep and temperature rhythms."

"Our volunteers did not gain weight despite increasing caloric intake."

In further good news, the researchers added: "Results show that females were less hungry when eating chocolate and had less desire for sweets than with no chocolate, especially when taking chocolate during the evening/night.

"Moreover, daily cortisol levels were lower when eating chocolate in the morning than at evening/night."

Before everyone gets excited and starts chowing down chocolate every morning, though, it should be noted that - like anything else - eating chocolate should be done in moderation.

In other words, eat a ridiculous amount of chocolate and you'll probably still be putting on the pounds, no matter what time of day you eat it.

Still, this study at least gives you some ammunition at Christmas when you're eating chocolate for the sixth morning in a row.

Eating chocolate for breakfast can actually help you LOSE weight, scientists claim

Irish Post 29 June, 2021 - 04:24am

While a balanced and healthy diet is essential to any weight loss plan, scientists believe a little late night indulgence could help you shed any unwanted pounds.

It certainly goes against common logic, which dictates that milk chocolate's high sugar and fat content makes it a sweet treat to avoid for anyone on a diet.

The researchers found eating chocolate in the morning or evening did not lead to weight gain but could actually act as an appetite suppressant.

In the morning, eating chocolate was found to help with fat burn while reducing glucose levels in the blood. Meanwhile, at night, it was found to alter metabolism and lead to better, more regular, sleep patterns.

Frank A.J. L. Scheer, a neuroscientist with the division of sleep and circadian disorders, who worked on the study said: "Having chocolate in the morning or in the evening/night results in differential effects on hunger and appetite, substrate oxidation, fasting glucose, microbiota (composition and function), and sleep and temperature rhythms.

"Our findings highlight that not only ‘what’ but also ‘when’ we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight."

The trial took place over a period of 14 days with researchers noting that, aside from chocolate, the women studied were free to eat “any other foods”.

During the study they were only allowed to eat milk chocolate but were free to have other sweets and treats.

The researchers concluded: "Results show that when eating chocolate, females were less hungry and had less desire for sweets than with no chocolate, especially when taking chocolate during the evening/night.

"Moreover, daily cortisol levels were lower when eating chocolate in the morning than at evening/night."

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New Research Suggests a Link Between Chocolate at Breakfast and Weight-loss

Men's health UK 28 June, 2021 - 10:18am

Time to get your chocolate fix

Published in FASEB Journal, research by Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests eating chocolate early in the day could aid weight loss, as the study saw participants eat 100g of milk chocolate within one hour of waking up and one hour before they went to sleep for two weeks. The researchers found that, despite their chocolate intake, there was no difference in their weight.

"Having chocolate in the morning or the evening/night results in differential effects on hunger and appetite, substrate oxidation, fasting glucose, microbiota (composition and function), and sleep and temperature rhythms," explained Frank A.J. L. Scheer, a neuroscientist with the division of sleep and circadian disorders and one of the researchers behind the study.

"Our findings highly suggest that not only 'what' but also 'when' we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight."

"Results show that females were less hungry when eating chocolate and had less desire for sweets than with no chocolate, especially when taking chocolate during the evening/night," the researchers added. "Moreover, daily cortisol levels were lower when eating chocolate in the morning than at evening/night."

Chocolate for breakfast may have 'unexpected benefits' claims study

Metro.co.uk 28 June, 2021 - 06:03am

NEWS... BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT

Reaching for a bar of milk chocolate first thing in the morning may not be everyone’s idea of healthy eating.

But a study from the US has suggested it may not be all that bad.

The researchers say having chocolate for breakfast could have ‘unexpected benefits’ by helping you burn body fat.

The idea is the chocolate fires up your metabolism and gets you burning fat as well as decreasing blood sugar levels over the course of the day.

Scientists in Boston, Massachusetts gave 100g of milk chocolate to 19 post-menopausal women within one hour after waking up and one hour before bedtime.

The trial was randomized and controlled and the researchers then compared weight gain and other measures against those that had no chocolate intake.

The findings showed:

‘Our findings highlight that not only ‘what’ but also ‘when’ we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight,’ said Frank A. J. L. Scheer a neuroscientist at the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Marta Garaulet, a visiting scientist also at Brigham and Women’s Hospital added: ‘Our volunteers did not gain weight despite increasing caloric intake.

‘Our results show that chocolate reduced ad libitum energy intake, consistent with the observed reduction in hunger, appetite and the desire for sweets shown in previous studies.’

The reason chocolate could actually be beneficial is because of beneficial chemicals called flavanols found naturally in cocoa that increase fat oxidation. 

However, the study was limited to post-menopausal women. So, unsurprisingly, more studies should be performed on men and younger women to confirm is this is universal.

Until then, we’d gently suggest a breakfast offering a combination of protein and carbs without the excess sugar and fat.

Not convinced? Find out more »

Chocolate for breakfast? It just may help you burn fat better, believe it or not

Study Finds 27 June, 2021 - 03:25pm

More specifically, an international team discovered that consuming chocolate during a narrow window of time after waking up improves health in a study of postmenopausal women. Researchers examined 19 women who ate 100 grams of chocolate within one hour of waking up each morning. The group also consumed the same amount of chocolate one hour before bed. The team then compared weight gain and other measures of health to people not eating chocolate.

In news that will have chocolate fans jumping for joy, results show morning and nighttime chocolate eating did not lead to weight gain in these women. Moreover, eating chocolate at either time of day can influence a person’s appetite, gut microbiome balance, and sleep quality.

When it comes to the morning, a bowl of chocolaty cereal appears to be a good way of getting your metabolism going. The study finds eating chocolate for breakfast can increase fat burning ability. It also reduces blood glucose levels, a key measure for people at risk from diabetes. At night, eating chocolate before bed led to changes in the participants’ resting and exercise metabolism the following morning.

“Our findings highlight that not only ‘what’ but also ‘when’ we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight,” says study author and neuroscientist Frank A. J. L. Scheer in a media release.

“Our volunteers did not gain weight despite increasing caloric intake. Our results show that chocolate reduced ad libitum energy intake, consistent with the observed reduction in hunger, appetite and the desire for sweets shown in previous studies,” adds co-author Marta Garaulet, PhD.

The finding appear in The FASEB Journal.

Chris Melore has been a writer, researcher, editor, and producer in the New York-area since 2006. He won a local Emmy award for his work in sports television in 2011.

Eating CHOCOLATE for breakfast can supercharge weight loss, scientists discover

The Sun 25 June, 2021 - 02:28pm

News Corp is a network of leading companies in the worlds of diversified media, news, education, and information services.

STARTING your day with chocolate could help you burn fat and supercharge your weight loss, scientists have claimed.

A balanced diet means having having a little bit of what we fancy -with experts saying snaffling choc at night could also help weight loss efforts.

Milk chocolate is known for high sugar and high levels of fat and isn't the first food you think of when going on a diet.

But researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, US, looked at the benefits of including chocolate in diets.

They recorded data from 19 postmenopausal women.

To test whether chocolate could help with weight loss, each woman consumed 100g of milk chocolate either within one our of waking up, or within one hour of going to bed.

The experts then compared weight gain in women who had the chocolate and women who didn't.

The study, published in the FASEB Journal could be relief for many women who want to lose weight, but don't want to give up chocolate.

Eating chocolate in the morning or at night did not make a difference on weight, the researchers found.

They also stated that consuming chocolate can influence hunger and appetite, as well as sleep.

In the morning eating chocolate could help with fat burn and could also reduce glucose levels in the blood, the scientists said.

At night, they said it could alter metabolism and led to more regular sleep patterns.

Frank A.J. L. Scheer, neuroscientist with the division of sleep and circadian disorders said: "Having chocolate in the morning or in the evening/night results in differential effects on hunger and appetite, substrate oxidation, fasting glucose, microbiota (composition and function), and sleep and temperature rhythms. 

"Our findings highly that not only ‘what’ but also ‘when’ we eat can impact physiological mechanisms involved in the regulation of body weight."

During the two weeks they could only have milk chocolate - but were allowed to have other sweets and treats.

The researchers added: "Results show that when eating chocolate, females were less hungry and had less desire for sweets than with no chocolate, especially when taking chocolate during the evening/night.

"Moreover, daily cortisol levels were lower when eating chocolate in the morning than at evening/night."

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