How to upgrade from Windows 10 to Windows 11 for free right now

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Yahoo Entertainment 26 September, 2021 - 11:35am 45 views

Is Windows 11 released?

The official release date for Windows 11 is October 5, but Microsoft is planning to roll it out gradually over the next few months to prevent widespread problems. The build number in the Release Preview channel is 22000.194, the same version released to the Beta channel on September 16. Ars TechnicaWindows 11 hits the Release Preview Insider channel as official release nears

Using Windows 10? Change these default settings now.

Windows 11 may be on the way, but more than 1 billion people are still using Windows 10 -- and many have no idea about the default settings that collect information, make you see more ads and notifications and may be slowing down your device. (It will be free to upgrade to Windows 11 if you're already using Windows 10 -- here's how to download Windows 10 free if you haven't already. And here's how to tell if you can upgrade to Windows 11.) 

If you're a Windows 10 user, you'll want to spend just a few minutes looking into these default settings, and potentially turning them off, for the sake of privacy, speed and convenience. Here are eight settings that are turned on by default that you can disable in Windows 10. (You can also check out the top Windows 10 tips and tricks, and how to troubleshoot common Windows 10 problems.) 

Stay current on the latest Microsoft news, plus reviews and advice on Windows PCs.

A feature Windows 10 added is an optimized update delivery system, which lets you download updates from other Windows 10 computers over the Internet (not just from Microsoft's servers). The catch, of course, is that your computer is also used as an update-sharing hub for other Windows 10 users.

This feature is turned on by default, but you can turn it off by going to Settings > Update & security > Advanced options > Delivery optimization, and toggle Allow downloads from other PCs off. 

The Windows 10 Action Center is a handy central hub for all of your notifications -- apps, reminders, recently installed programs. But notification overload is definitely a thing, especially when you add unnecessary notifications (such as Windows tips) into the mix.

Get your notifications under control by going to Settings > System > Notifications & actions and turning off things like Get tips, tricks and suggestions when you use Windows or Show me the Windows welcome experience after updates and occasionally when I sign in to highlight what's new and suggested, and individual app notifications.

Microsoft pushes its Windows Store apps -- so much so, in fact, that you may be seeing apps you never downloaded in your Start menu. These suggested apps are basically ads. 

Turn off these pesky ads by going to Settings > Personalization > Start > Show suggestions occasionally in Start. For more information, check out our Windows 10 Start menu guide.

Microsoft is definitely keeping tabs on your preferences and browsing habits in Windows 10. You even have a unique advertising ID (tied to your Microsoft account), which the company uses to show you targeted ads. Oh, and Microsoft also shares this advertising ID profile with third-party apps from the Windows Store, unless, of course, you turn this information sharing off.

You can turn this off by going to Settings > Privacy > General > Let apps use advertising ID to make ads more interesting to you based on your app activity (Turning this off will reset your ID).

Cortana, your adaptive personal assistant in Windows 10, gets, well, pretty personal with the information she collects about you. Cortana "gets to know you" by collecting information such as speech and handwriting patterns and typing history, which you may consider to be just a little creepy.

You can stop Cortana from getting to know you, and clear your information from your device, by going to Settings > Privacy > Inking & typing and toggle the option off. 

In Windows 10, many apps run in the background -- that means, even if you don't have them open -- by default. These apps can receive information, send notifications, download and install updates and otherwise eat up your bandwidth and your battery life. If you're using a mobile device and/or a metered connection, you may want to turn this feature off.

To do this, go to Settings > Privacy > Background apps and either toggle off Let apps run in the background, or toggle off each app individually.

Windows 10 is all about syncing. Everything -- system settings, themes, passwords, search history -- syncs across all your signed-in devices by default. But not all of us want our search history to sync from our phones to our computers, so here's how to turn syncing off.

To turn off settings syncing (including themes and passwords), go to Settings > Accounts > Sync your settings. You can turn off all settings syncing, or you can selectively turn off specific settings.

Windows 10 downloads and installs updates automatically, and you can't really turn them off. And honestly, you shouldn't turn them off -- an up-to-date operating system is a secure operating system. But if for some reason you'd like to prevent your computer from automatically downloading and installing Windows 10 updates (perhaps so you can manually download and install said updates on your own schedule), you can pause the updates for a set amount of time. Got to Settings > Updates > Advanced options, and under Pause updates, choose a date within the next 35 days. You won't be able to pause again after that point until you update, though. 

For more, check out the best Windows 11 features we've found so far and how to use them, and everything to know about upgrading from Windows 10 to Windows 11

Read full article at Yahoo Entertainment

Windows 11 will give you another reason to choose Android over iOS

TechRadar 26 September, 2021 - 06:00pm

The Your Phone app is getting a makeover for Windows 11

At its recent Surface event, the company briefly showcased a new version of the Your Phone app, which lets users hook up their Android smartphone to their PC in order to access messages, notifications and more.

Like Microsoft’s other Windows apps (Calendar, Mail, Snipping Tool etc.), Your Phone is getting a new lick of paint for Windows 11, as well as an interface update that puts the notification panel front-and-center.

Although the Your Phone update doesn’t appear to offer any new functionality, it will bring the app in line with the new Windows 11 aesthetic, characterized by rounded corners and a soft color palette.

The effect is a much cleaner and less cluttered feel, with easier access to important notifications, which are concealed behind a tab in the current version.

Historically, Apple has always held the lead when it comes to synergies between PCs and mobile devices; the benefits of the ecosystem the company has created both make it more likely a person will own multiple Apple devices, and less likely they will look elsewhere for future purchases.

The Your PC app attempts to offer some of the same benefits to Windows users who own Android devices, allowing them to access messages and make calls without having to reach into their pocket.

At the Windows 11 launch event, Microsoft also revealed that Android apps will also run natively on Windows 11, downloadable via the Microsoft Store.

Although Windows 11 and Android devices will likely never work in concert in quite the same way as an iPhone and Mac, Microsoft is at least working to close the gap.

Via Windows Latest

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Microsoft details Windows 11’s seamless and smaller updates

WindowsLatest 26 September, 2021 - 06:00pm

When Microsoft announced Windows 11 in June, the company promised to deliver 40% smaller updates than Windows 10 cumulative updates. Microsoft officials have finally explained how Windows 11 would deliver “seamless updates” that will happen in the background.

Windows 11 is expected to follow Windows 10’s servicing model, so you can expect new cumulative updates every month. However, there’s one important change: Microsoft is switching to an annual feature update model which means a single feature update will be released every year.

In addition to fewer feature updates, Windows Update quality improvements also come from the optimizations that have been made to the update engine in Windows. For example, when you check for updates and a new patch is available, Windows will now compare the new package with what’s already available on the computer.

It will only download the necessary pieces from the server and this would reduce the update sizes by around 40%.

Microsoft officials further explained that the same mechanism will also apply to Windows Update for Business or services like Microsoft Endpoint Manager. Enterprises can manage drivers and critical security updates using the configuration manager. On the other hand, consumers can rely on Windows 11’s optional updates feature.

Microsoft has promised that Windows 11 update process would be less “impactful to users”. In other words, features like active hours will now be turned on by default and Microsoft will be using a new version of its AI/ML tech to determine the hours when you’re not actively using the PC.

To reduce the disturbance and impact of the monthly updates, Windows Updates will be downloaded automatically when you’re not actively using the PC.

It is worth noting that Windows 11 update process won’t be dramatically faster than Windows 10, so you would still need to restart the machine and then stare at that screen for a few minutes.

Microsoft is currently planning to launch Windows 11 on October 5 and it would be slightly faster than the previous versions of Windows 10.

Microsoft rolls back Cumulative Update KB5005101 to fix app launch issue - MSPoweruser

MSPoweruser 26 September, 2021 - 06:00pm

Microsoft has addressed an issue with the latest Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB5005101.

Users were complaining that apps were failing to open, close unexpectedly or become unresponsive or users were receiving a white window when attempting to login.

The issue started after installing KB5005101 on devices using Microsoft Exploit Protection Export Address Filtering (EAF).

All supported versions of Windows 10 were affected and also Windows Server 1809 and higher.

Microsoft has addressed the issue by using Known Issue Rollback (KIR), and enterprise users can also fix the issue by installing and configuring a special Group Policy.

It may take up to 24 hrs for the fix to propagate, but users can speed it up by restarting their PC.

Admins can read more at Microsoft here.

via Deskmodder

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Windows 11 is getting an update to make it better for Android users

Tom's Guide 26 September, 2021 - 06:00pm

The Your Phone app is getting a Windows 11 makeover

As with other apps updated for Windows 11, the Your Phone app enjoys a new look, with rounded corners and a softer set of colors, but the real improvement lies in the interface.

If you boot up the app right now, you’ll see separate sections for Notifications, Messages, Calls and (if you own a supported Samsung device or a Surface Duo) Apps. With the new version, XDA Developers spotted that notifications now cascade along the left hand side of the app, with the ability to respond directly from your desktop or laptop if appropriate. 

Meanwhile, Messages, Photos, Apps and Calls are relocated to the top of the screen. It’s a less cluttered look which should make the app a bit more accessible to newcomers — albeit undoubtedly a bit confusing to those who have got used to the current layout. 

And with Microsoft fully on board with Android, having waved the white flag on Windows Phone some time ago, a lot more people can benefit.

I installed Your Phone for Windows 10 upon release, but haven’t booted it up again since. Why? Because the stuff I rely on already has perfectly good systems in place. 

WhatsApp Web is actually where I send and receive most of my messages, and the Windows 10 app is excellent, pinned to my taskbar and instantly popping up notifications as messages arrive. 

Equally, any pictures I need on my desktop can be quickly synced with Google Photos on the phone, without needing to bother with Microsoft’s own app. Sending SMS messages and making calls from the desktop would be nice… but I do both so rarely that a ready-made solution hardly seems worthwhile.

But for some it will prove invaluable, and that — combined with the upcoming Android app support for Windows 11 — makes Microsoft’s OS a natural home for Android users, and may make Mac-curious types think twice before making the jump.

Microsoft Windows 11 will be released on October 5 as a free upgrade to Windows 10, but the rollout is going to be staggered, so don’t expect to see it on your screen immediately unless you buy a new device — such as Microsoft’s own Surface Pro 8, Surface Pro X, Surface Go 3 or the innovative new Surface Laptop Studio

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Tesla drivers can now request Full Self-Driving Beta with the press of a button, despite safety concerns

Neowin 25 September, 2021 - 05:28pm

Electric vehicle maker Tesla rolled out a long-awaited software update Friday night that allows customers to request access to its controversial Full Self-Driving Beta (FSD Beta) software.

The move delighted fans of CEO Elon Musk and Tesla, but it risks drawing the ire of federal vehicle safety authorities who are already investigating the automaker for possible safety defects in its driver-assistance systems.

FSD Beta is an unfinished version of Tesla's premium driver-assistance software, FSD, which the company sells in the U.S. for $10,000 upfront, or $199 a month.

FSD is marketed with the promise of enabling a Tesla to automatically change lanes, navigate on the highway, move into a parking spot, or roll out from a parking spot to drive a small distance at a slow pace without anyone behind the wheel.

FSD Beta gives drivers access to an "autosteer on city streets" feature, which has yet to be perfected and enables drivers to automatically navigate around urban environments alongside other vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists and pets without moving the steering wheel with their own hands. Drivers are supposed to remain attentive, however, with both hands on the wheel and prepared to take over driving at any time.

None of Tesla's driver assistance systems — including the company's standard Autopilot package, premium Full Self-Driving option, or FSD Beta — make Teslas autonomous.

The company previously made FSD Beta available to about 2,000 people, a mix of mostly employees and some customers, who test it out on public roads even though the software hasn't been debugged.

The new download button could ostensibly lead to a rapid expansion in the number of participants who are not trained regulatory officials.

Last week, when CEO Musk announced new details about the FSD beta button, Jennifer Homendy, the head of the National Transporation Safety Board, voiced concern over the company's plans in an interview with The Wall Street Journal.

Homendy said, "Basic safety issues have to be addressed," before Tesla expands FSD Beta to other city streets and regions. The NTSB chief was also displeased that the company was conducting testing of the unfinished product with untrained drivers on public roads in lieu of safety professionals.

Homendy also remarked — and in interviews with Autonocast, an industry podcast, and the Washington Post — that Tesla's use of the term Full Self-Driving for a "level 2" driver assistance system is misleading and confusing.

Musk himself said last week in a tweet that FSD Beta now seems so good it can give drivers the wrong idea that they don't need to pay attention to driving while FSD Beta is engaged, even though they are supposed to remain attentive and at the wheel at all times.

On Saturday, after Tesla enabled the "request full self-driving beta" feature in its vehicles — a fan blog named Teslarati shared a post on Twitter asking, "Does Tesla have a fair chance after NTSB Chief comments?"

Musk replied to them on Twitter with a link to the Wikipedia biography of Homendy. While Musk has previously urged his tens of millions of followers on Twitter to alter a description of his own career on Wikipedia, he shared this link to Homendy's bio there without comment.

CNBC reached out to Tesla and the NTSB — neither was immediately available to comment on Saturday.

Musk has been promising Tesla owners an FSD beta download button for months. In March 2021, he wrote in a tweet that the forthcoming button would give users access to the latest FSD Beta build as soon as their car connected to Wi-Fi.

He changed that approach, however. Now, Tesla has a calculator it uses to give drivers a "safety score," and determine who will be allowed to get and use FSD Beta software.

Screen-shots shared with CNBC by Tesla owners with FSD indicate that the company's "safety score" is akin to an insurance risk factor score.

Tesla's systems tabulate a drivers': "Predicted Collision Frequency, Forward Collision Warning per 1,000 Miles, Hard Braking, Aggressive Turning, Unsafe Following Time, and Forced Autopilot Disengagements," according to correspondence and screenshots viewed by CNBC.

Tesla's system does not, at this time, appear to measure and account for how often drivers fail to keep their hands on the wheel, how quickly they take over driving when prompted, or how consistently they keep their eyes on the road.

Only users who have a great driving record for a full week, in Tesla's view, may gain access to FSD Beta.

Before Tesla released its FSD Beta button (and the 10.1 version of FSD Beta, which is expected this weekend, too) CNBC asked the California DMV Autonomous Vehicles Branch how pervasive and safe FSD Beta-equipped vehicles have been in use in the state so far.

The DMV declined an interview request but said, in an e-mailed statement:

"Based on information the information Tesla has provided the DMV, the feature does not make the vehicle an autonomous vehicle per California regulations. The DMV continues to gather information from Tesla on its beta release – including any expansion of the program and features.  If the capabilities of the feature change such that it meets the definition of an autonomous vehicle per California's law and regulations, Tesla will need to operate under the appropriate regulatory authorization. Regardless of the level of vehicle autonomy, the DMV has reminded Tesla that clear and effective communication to the driver about the technology's capabilities, limitations and intended use is necessary. The DMV is reviewing the company's use of the term 'Full Self-Driving' for its technology. Because it is ongoing, the DMV cannot discuss the review until it is complete."

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Tesla drivers can now request Full Self-Driving Beta with the press of a button, despite safety concerns

BleepingComputer 25 September, 2021 - 05:28pm

Electric vehicle maker Tesla rolled out a long-awaited software update Friday night that allows customers to request access to its controversial Full Self-Driving Beta (FSD Beta) software.

The move delighted fans of CEO Elon Musk and Tesla, but it risks drawing the ire of federal vehicle safety authorities who are already investigating the automaker for possible safety defects in its driver-assistance systems.

FSD Beta is an unfinished version of Tesla's premium driver-assistance software, FSD, which the company sells in the U.S. for $10,000 upfront, or $199 a month.

FSD is marketed with the promise of enabling a Tesla to automatically change lanes, navigate on the highway, move into a parking spot, or roll out from a parking spot to drive a small distance at a slow pace without anyone behind the wheel.

FSD Beta gives drivers access to an "autosteer on city streets" feature, which has yet to be perfected and enables drivers to automatically navigate around urban environments alongside other vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists and pets without moving the steering wheel with their own hands. Drivers are supposed to remain attentive, however, with both hands on the wheel and prepared to take over driving at any time.

None of Tesla's driver assistance systems — including the company's standard Autopilot package, premium Full Self-Driving option, or FSD Beta — make Teslas autonomous.

The company previously made FSD Beta available to about 2,000 people, a mix of mostly employees and some customers, who test it out on public roads even though the software hasn't been debugged.

The new download button could ostensibly lead to a rapid expansion in the number of participants who are not trained regulatory officials.

Last week, when CEO Musk announced new details about the FSD beta button, Jennifer Homendy, the head of the National Transporation Safety Board, voiced concern over the company's plans in an interview with The Wall Street Journal.

Homendy said, "Basic safety issues have to be addressed," before Tesla expands FSD Beta to other city streets and regions. The NTSB chief was also displeased that the company was conducting testing of the unfinished product with untrained drivers on public roads in lieu of safety professionals.

Homendy also remarked — and in interviews with Autonocast, an industry podcast, and the Washington Post — that Tesla's use of the term Full Self-Driving for a "level 2" driver assistance system is misleading and confusing.

Musk himself said last week in a tweet that FSD Beta now seems so good it can give drivers the wrong idea that they don't need to pay attention to driving while FSD Beta is engaged, even though they are supposed to remain attentive and at the wheel at all times.

On Saturday, after Tesla enabled the "request full self-driving beta" feature in its vehicles — a fan blog named Teslarati shared a post on Twitter asking, "Does Tesla have a fair chance after NTSB Chief comments?"

Musk replied to them on Twitter with a link to the Wikipedia biography of Homendy. While Musk has previously urged his tens of millions of followers on Twitter to alter a description of his own career on Wikipedia, he shared this link to Homendy's bio there without comment.

CNBC reached out to Tesla and the NTSB — neither was immediately available to comment on Saturday.

Musk has been promising Tesla owners an FSD beta download button for months. In March 2021, he wrote in a tweet that the forthcoming button would give users access to the latest FSD Beta build as soon as their car connected to Wi-Fi.

He changed that approach, however. Now, Tesla has a calculator it uses to give drivers a "safety score," and determine who will be allowed to get and use FSD Beta software.

Screen-shots shared with CNBC by Tesla owners with FSD indicate that the company's "safety score" is akin to an insurance risk factor score.

Tesla's systems tabulate a drivers': "Predicted Collision Frequency, Forward Collision Warning per 1,000 Miles, Hard Braking, Aggressive Turning, Unsafe Following Time, and Forced Autopilot Disengagements," according to correspondence and screenshots viewed by CNBC.

Tesla's system does not, at this time, appear to measure and account for how often drivers fail to keep their hands on the wheel, how quickly they take over driving when prompted, or how consistently they keep their eyes on the road.

Only users who have a great driving record for a full week, in Tesla's view, may gain access to FSD Beta.

Before Tesla released its FSD Beta button (and the 10.1 version of FSD Beta, which is expected this weekend, too) CNBC asked the California DMV Autonomous Vehicles Branch how pervasive and safe FSD Beta-equipped vehicles have been in use in the state so far.

The DMV declined an interview request but said, in an e-mailed statement:

"Based on information the information Tesla has provided the DMV, the feature does not make the vehicle an autonomous vehicle per California regulations. The DMV continues to gather information from Tesla on its beta release – including any expansion of the program and features.  If the capabilities of the feature change such that it meets the definition of an autonomous vehicle per California's law and regulations, Tesla will need to operate under the appropriate regulatory authorization. Regardless of the level of vehicle autonomy, the DMV has reminded Tesla that clear and effective communication to the driver about the technology's capabilities, limitations and intended use is necessary. The DMV is reviewing the company's use of the term 'Full Self-Driving' for its technology. Because it is ongoing, the DMV cannot discuss the review until it is complete."

Got a confidential news tip? We want to hear from you.

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Data is a real-time snapshot *Data is delayed at least 15 minutes. Global Business and Financial News, Stock Quotes, and Market Data and Analysis.

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