How to view Lyrid meteor shower

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Fox News 21 April, 2021 - 01:59pm 27 views

What time is the Lyrid meteor shower tonight?

What time is the meteor shower tonight? Best viewing of the Lyrid meteor shower will be 12am (midnight) on Friday, April 23, until the sun rises. 7NEWS.com.auLyrids Meteor Shower 2021: What is it, best times to see, and how to watch it in Australia

What time is the meteor shower April 22 2021?

Meteor Showers of 2021 The Lyrids reach their peak on the night of April 21–22, 2021, when you can expect to see an average of 10 meteors per hour in dark, clear skies between midnight and dawn. Rarely, the Lyrids produce surges of up to 100 meteors per hour. almanac.comMeteor Shower Calendar 2021: When Is the Next Meteor Shower?

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In late April, skywatchers in the northern hemisphere will get a view of 2018's Lyrid meteor shower. Here is everything you need to know about this year’s starry spectacle.

The annual Lyrid meteor shower will light up the night sky this week, with its peak in the predawn hours on Thursday.

While the first months of the year have been quiet since January's Quadrantid meteor shower, the Lyrids are a welcome sight to observers hoping for a celestial spectacle. 

Though the shooting stars can appear anywhere in the sky, curious stargazers can look to the meteors' namesake constellation Lyra -- the harp -- for reference as Lyrid meteors appear to radiate from near the bright star Vega, EarthSky reported on Tuesday.

The American Meteor Society shows that the moon will be around 68% full on Thursday, possibly impacting visibility.

Light pollution will also be a potentially debilitating factor and experts advise viewers to attempt to find an unobstructed view.

One of the oldest known meteor showers, Lyrids have been witnessed for 2,700 years, according to NASA

The agency notes they are recognizable for their fast and bright meteors and can produce an outburst of as many as 100 meteors per hour.

In general, 10 to 20 Lyrid meteors can be observed per hour during their peak, traveling at a velocity of 30 miles per second and NASA notes that Lyrids often leave behind glowing dust trains as they blaze through the Earth's atmosphere.

The source of the shower is the Comet Thatcher (C/1861 G1), which was discovered on April 5, 1861, by astronomer A. E. Thatcher.

As Earth crosses Thatcher's orbital path, it passes through a trail of debris and is bombarded with comet litter for two weeks.

Thatcher was last seen in the 19th century and isn’t expected to return until the year 2276, according to Insider.

After the Lyrids pass, there are still 11 meteor showers to watch for this year.

The Lyrids will overlap with the Eta Aquarids meteor shower that NASA says is set to peak in early May.

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How to catch the 2021 Lyrid meteor shower in NorCal

KCRA Sacramento 21 April, 2021 - 12:53pm

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Thursday is a good day to pay close attention to the sky. The annual Lyrid meteor shower marks the first big meteor show of the year, and it's expected to peak this week.

KCRA 3 Meteorologist Dirk Verdoorn says that while it won't be the most extravagant meteor shower, it's a good excuse to get outside.

Yes. The best time to see it is one to two hours before sunrise Thursday.

Look out for the Lyra Constellation. If you lay down on the grass and look straight up in the air, keep an eye out for Vega, a bright star.

Just to the right of that point, you will see the show. During its peak, this shower will feature about 10 meteors per hour.

There are several apps available through Apple and Google's stores to help in finding constellations and meteor showers.

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