Humans are practically defenseless. Why don't wild animals attack us more?

Science

Livescience.com 12 July, 2021 - 06:00am 71 views

There are a few likely reasons why they don't attack more often. Looking at our physiology, humans evolved to be bipedal — going from moving with all four limbs to walking upright on longer legs, according to John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bipedalism may make humans appear bigger and therefore more threatening to other species, but it also has disadvantages. It is typically slower to move on two legs than on four, meaning humans have abandoned any pretext of outrunning any four-legged creature, according to Hawks. 

"It's sort of like a bluff," Hawks said. "It's like, 'I'm walking around; I'm tough; I'm showing where I am on a landscape.'" Predators see the upright stance and assume humans are tougher than we actually are, according to Hawks. However, even if they were to call our bipedal bluff, predators have other reasons to leave us alone. 

A 2019 study published in the journal Human–Wildlife Interactions found that about eight people die annually in the U.S. from wild animal attacks and most of these deaths are due to venomous snake bites.  

Larger primates, such as humans and chimps, live in groups and adopted the strategy of aggressively defending themselves against threats, which usually works against predators, Hawks said. Being social has therefore helped keep us safe, along with the benefits of bipedalism.

As human technology advanced, we developed an arsenal of advanced weapons, such as bows and guns, that could be used from a distance. With these weapons, humans became so deadly that they began taking the fight to predators. 

Another reason humans are rarely attacked by large wild animals is that their numbers have declined. "We've been trying to essentially clear the landscape that we use of large predators for a very long time," Justin Suraci, lead scientist in community ecology and conservation biology at Conservation Science Partners, a nonprofit conservation science organization based in California, told Live Science. 

Predators living in other areas that are heavily populated by humans have faced similar problems. According to Suraci, the animals that have escaped human menace likely learned to become weary of our species. "For very logical reasons, some of these larger predators have a healthy fear of humans in the same way that any prey species would fear its predators," Suraci said. 

The recordings were designed to simulate benign conversation and consisted mostly of Suraci and his friends reciting poetry and passages from books. The effect was so strong, the recordings had a similar effect to removing predators from an ecosystem altogether, with reduced predator activity allowing small, would-be prey animals, like mice, to forage more than they normally would. 

Suraci thinks this fear that predators have of humans could also have an upside: It could help prevent conflict between humans and wildlife. Large predators need a lot of space, and in a human-dominated world, they need to be able to live alongside humans without conflict.

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"The fear of humans that a lot of these predators show is really positive in that light," Suraci said. "It gives us some opportunity to potentially share spaces with these animals — to go hiking in places where pumas, bears and wolves all exist, without experiencing any negative impacts." 

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Phone and GPS signals may be disrupted as high-speed solar storm heading towards Earth

WION 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

The solar storm that originated from the Sun's atmosphere can have a very relevant impact on a region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field, the report said.

A massive solar storm is on its way to the Earth. When it hits, it's likely to interrupt phone and GPS communications. 

According to a report from Spaceweather.com, the storm, which might interrupt telecommunications, could produce wind rates of up to 600 km per second. 

This can cause GPS navigation, cell phone signal, and satellite TV to be disrupted.

Scientists predict that solar storms will peak around 2024, based on present activity on the Sun. 

A large solar storm above Quebec in 1989, for example, produced a major blackout, and multiple ejections colliding into the Earth's magnetic field were reported in May this year.

Solar storms are known to disrupt satellites and electronic communications, as well as creating a spectacular display in the sky, which can be seen in places around the Arctic Circle. 

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High-speed solar storm approaching Earth; can interrupt cell phone, GPS signals

The Tribune India 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

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Because of the solar storm, there will be a view of fascinating celestial lighting for people living at the North or South Pole. — iStock

At a speed of 1.6 million kilometres, a powerful solar storm is approaching the Earth. The storm will hit the Earth on Sunday or Monday.

A report by Spaceweather.com claims that the storm has originated from the Sun's atmosphere. This would have a significant impact on the region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field.

"THE SOLAR WIND IS COMING: Later today, a high-speed stream of solar wind is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field. Flowing from an equatorial hole in the sun's atmosphere, wind speeds could top 500 km/s. Full-fledged geomagnetic storms are unlikely, but lesser geomagnetic unrest could spark high latitude auroras. Aurora alerts: SMS Text.", reads the post on their website.

Because of the solar storm, there will be a view of fascinating celestial lighting for people living at the North or South Pole.

Spaceweather.com added that the outer atmosphere of the Earth could be heated, due to solar storms, which could have a direct effect on the satellites.

This could cause interference with GPS navigation, mobile phone signal and satellite TV. The current in power lines can be high, which can also blow transformers.

As per the US space agency, NASA, the speed of the solar storm could increase from 1.6 million kilometres per hour.

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The Tribune, now published from Chandigarh, started publication on February 2, 1881, in Lahore (now in Pakistan). It was started by Sardar Dyal Singh Majithia, a public-spirited philanthropist, and is run by a trust comprising four eminent persons as trustees.

The Tribune, the largest selling English daily in North India, publishes news and views without any bias or prejudice of any kind. Restraint and moderation, rather than agitational language and partisanship, are the hallmarks of the paper. It is an independent newspaper in the real sense of the term.

The Tribune has two sister publications, Punjabi Tribune (in Punjabi) and Dainik Tribune (in Hindi).

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Here’s Why Your GPS & Mobile Phone Networks Might Not Work Today

ScoopWhoop 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

According to a report by Spaceweather, a powerful solar storm is approaching the Earth at a speed of 1.6 million kilometres. This would have a significant impact on the region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field due to which there may be a power failure around the world.

Due to solar storms, the outer atmosphere of the Earth could be heated and have a direct effect on the satellites, GPS navigation and mobile phone signals. The current in power lines might also be high, which can even blow transformers.

There might be visually pleasing auroras of fascinating celestial lighting at the North or South Pole because of the storm.

According to NASA, the US space agency, the speed of the storm could rise from 1.6 million kilometres per hour. 

Solar Storm With Massive Speed of 1.6 Million KMPH Expected To Hit Earth This Weekend; Solar Winds Could

LatestLY 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

As per US space agency NASA, the speed of the storm is likely to increase further. Due to the storm, satellite signals may be interrupted. The impact of the solar storm will be centred on a sub-solar point on the sunlit side of Earth, said Space Weather Prediction Centre of the United States. According to a report published in The Mint, there is also a possibility of blackout of High Frequency of radio communication. However, it will depend upon the current X-ray Flux intensity. See All Planets of the Solar System Along With The Moon Tonight in a Rare Sighting! Here Is the Time Table For The Stunning Celestial Event.

The Space Weather Prediction Centre rated the solar storm at X1 level. Satellites in the Earth's upper atmosphere are also likely to be impacted by the storm. As per an estimate by NASA, these winds are likely to have top and average speeds of about one million miles per hour. "As the wind flows toward Earth, it carries with it the Sun's magnetic field," reported Express quoting Nicky Fox, Director of NASA's Heliophysics Science Division as saying.

These winds could even break the Earth's Magnetic field. Due to this, GPS navigation, mobile phone signal and satellite TV and power grids are also expected to be affected. Notably, in March 1989, a solar storm had caused a nine-hour blackout of Hydro-Québec's electricity transmission system in Canada.

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Massive solar storm heading towards Earth at 1.6 million kmph may impact cell phone, GPS signals

DNA India 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

A fierce solar storm is moving towards the Earth at a speed of 1.6 million kilometers per hour. It is feared that this storm may hit the Earth either on Sunday or Monday, due to which there may be a power failure around the world.

According to the website SpaceWeather.com, the storm has originated from the Sun's atmosphere. A hole has opened up in the Sun's atmosphere and is spewing a stream of solar wind in Earth's direction.

According to the website, satellite signals can also be interrupted due to this collision. It can also have a direct effect on radio signals, communication and weather. Not only this, the storm can have a significant impact on a region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field.

As per the US space agency, NASA, the speed of the solar storm could increase from 1.6 million kilometres per hour.

This can heat the Earth's outer atmosphere, which will have a direct effect on satellites. It can cause interference in GPS navigation, mobile phone signals and satellite TV, current in power lines can be increased. However, this is rarely the case because the Earth's magnetic field acts as a protective shield.

According to the Space Weather Prediction Centre of the United States, the impact of the solar flare will be centered on sub-solar point on the sunlit side of Earth. NASA has classified this flare as an X1.5-class flare.

X-class denotes the most intense flares, while the number provides more information about its strength. An X2 is twice as intense as an X1, an X3 is three times as intense, etc.

Due to the solar storm, people living at the North or South Pole will be able to see a view of beautiful celestial lighting (auroras) at night.

Historically, solar storms have been known to plunge parts of the world into chaos. A solar storm in March 1989 caused a nine-hour blackout Hydro-Québec's electricity transmission system in Canada.

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Solar storm likely to hit Earth today: GPS, internet, satellites may be affected

Firstpost 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

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A solar storm is likely to hit Earth today, on 12 July. Solar winds travelling at a speed of 1.6 million kilometres per hour are expected to hit the Earth today and may impact GPS and high-speed internet reported The Indian Express.

A stream of charged particles and high-speed solar winds were created when a hole opened up in the atmosphere of the sun.

These solar flares are the explosions on the surface of the Sun which then release light, high-speed particles and energy into space. The first solar flare of this year happened on 3 July.

On 31 August 2012, a long prominence/filament of solar material that had been hovering in the Sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space at 4:36 p.m. EDT. Representational image. Image: Wikimedia Commons

It is expected that the solar winds may cause a geomagnetic storm in the magnetosphere. The storms which are caused by the efficient exchange of energy when solar winds enter the Earth’s space are called geomagnetic storms. According to a report in Outlook, this minor storm in the magnetosphere might result in auroras in north and south latitudinous regions.

The Indian Express reports that the satellites which are in the upper layer of the atmosphere might get affected due to the geomagnetic storm. Technologies including mobile phone signal, satellite TV and GPS navigation may get affected due to the storm. It is likely that power grids might also not be operational due to the solar storm.

Quoting the Space Weather Prediction Centre of the United States, the publication reported that high-frequency radio communication might also not be functional for one hour.

The solar flares have been marked at X1 level by the Centre wherein X denotes the classification and the number denotes the strength of the flare. The smallest flares are from the A-class. It is followed by B, C, M and X.

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Solar storm heading towards Earth likely to hit today, can impact GPS & mobile signal

The Indian Express 12 July, 2021 - 09:49am

A high-speed solar storm that is approaching the Earth at a speed of 1.6 million kilometres per hour, according to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), is expected to hit our planet’s magnetic field later today, affecting electricity supply and communication infrastructure around the world.

The solar flare, flowing from an equatorial hole in the sun’s atmosphere that was first detected on July 3, can travel at a maximum speed of 500 km/second, according to spaceweather.com. Although full-fledged geomagnetic (magnetic field associated with Earth) storms are unlikely, lesser geomagnetic unrest could spark high-latitude auroras.

The satellites in the Earth’s upper atmosphere are also expected to get impacted by the incoming flares. This will directly impact GPS navigation, mobile phone signal and satellite TV. Power grids can also be hit by the solar flares.

According to the latest prediction of the Space Weather Prediction Centre of the United States, the storm can also lead to a blackout of high-frequency radio communication for nearly an hour in a vast area. The Centre has marked the solar flares at X1 level, ‘X’ denoting the classification and the numerical suffix denoting the strength of the flare.

Solar flares are massive explosions on the surface of the sun that release energy, light and high-speed particles into space. According to Nasa, the biggest flares are known as “X-class flares” based on a classification system that categorises solar flares as per their strength. The smallest ones fall under A-class, followed by B, C, M and X. The solar flare that is likely to hit Earth’s magnetic field today is an X-class flare.

For all the latest Technology News, download Indian Express App.

High-speed solar storm may hit Earth today: All you need to know

Hindustan Times 12 July, 2021 - 09:37am

A geomagnetic storm is expected to hit the Earth's atmosphere on Monday and weather experts are keeping a close watch on it. The storm is moving towards the direction of the earth and is expected to batter parts of the planet.

According to website Spaceweather.com, the storm is approaching the Earth at a speed of 1.6 million kilometres. It originated from the Sun's atmosphere and can have a significant impact on a region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field.

Due to solar storms, the outer atmosphere of the Earth can be heated which can have a direct effect on satellites. This can cause interference with GPS navigation, mobile phone signal and satellite TV. The current in power lines can be high, which can also blow transformers.

In May this year, millions of tons of super-heated gas shot off from the surface of the sun and hurtled 90 million miles toward Earth. The eruption, called a coronal mass ejection and when it hit the Earth’s magnetic field it triggered the strongest geomagnetic storm seen for years, reported Bloomberg.

In March 1989, a solar storm over Quebec caused a province-wide outage that lasted nine hours, according to Hydro-Quebec’s website.

To head off such a catastrophe, US President Barack Obama’s administration laid out a strategy to begin raising awareness of the dangers of massive solar storms and to assess the risks they pose. Last year, President Donald Trump signed the ProSwift bill into law, which aims to build up technology to improve forecasting and measurement of space weather events.

Solar storms have their roots in an 11-year cycle that shifts the polarity of the Sun’s magnetic field. The magnetic forces at work on the sun get tangled during the process and can punch out through the surface, sending the sun’s plasma into outer space and potentially triggering storms on Earth.

The most powerful geomagnetic storm ever recorded resulted in the 1859 Carrington Event when telegraph lines electrified, destroying operators and setting offices ablaze in North America and Europe.

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