In Full: Star Trek's William Shatner blasts into space on Blue Origin rocket

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The Sun 13 October, 2021 - 11:05am

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William Shatner's biggest roles, from 'Star Trek' to 'Boston Legal'

Fox News 13 October, 2021 - 05:32pm

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The actor and passengers discuss the ‘possibilities’ of spaceflight ahead of traveling in Jeff Bezos’ rocket.

William Shatner is undoubtedly one of the most legendary actors of all time.

A pop culture icon, Shatner has pervaded Hollywood since the 1950s. With seven decades in the industry and countless films and TV shows under his belt, it’s hard to deny the influence Shatner has had on cinema and culture as a whole.

Let’s take a look back at some of the actor’s most iconic roles.

In 1982, Shatner graced television screens all around the world as the titular character in the ABC and CBS police drama, "T.J. Hooker."

In the show, Hooker, a policeman motivated to avenge the death of his partner, dons the uniform once again as a member of the fictional Lake City Police Department to rid the streets of violent criminals.

Hooker’s no-nonsense, hardened attitude was a defining factor in making this one of Shatner’s most iconic roles. As a result, the show had a successful run of five seasons over the course of four years.

Shatner had a prominent role in presenting "Rescue 911," a docudrama that aired on CBS from 1989 to 1996.

For eight years, Shatner hosted the show that featured reenactments (and sometimes real footage) of 911 emergencies. The show proved to be so powerful to audiences that two specials — "100 Lives Saved" and "200 Lives Saved" — were made in response to viewers who used the knowledge obtained on the show to save the lives of someone else.

Shatner portrayed the Big Giant Head, an extraterrestrial leader that the alien characters had to report to.

In his role, the Big Giant Head served as the ruler of the galaxy and as the mission leader for the Solomons. He would relay messages to earth through Harry Solomon (played by French Stewart) and was often subject to disdain by the Solomons over his questionable leadership.

From 2004 to 2008, Shatner portrayed conservative attorney Denny Crane in the final season of "The Practice," which lead into its spinoff, "Boston Legal."

A renowned and undefeated attorney of nearly 50 years, Crane boasts an eccentric personality and considered himself to be a legend. As the series progresses, however, he becomes plagued with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and slowly backs away from lawyer appearances in court.

Did you expect to go through this entire list without seeing Captain James T. Kirk?

Appearing in the very first episode of "Star Trek: The Original Series," Captain Kirk quickly emerged as one of the most popular characters out of the franchise and proved to be Shatner’s breakthrough role.

As the leading star and the captain of the starship USS Enterprise, Captain Kirk captivated "Star Trek" fans around the world as he led his crew to new worlds and explored new civilizations. Kirk even popularized the phrase, "Where no man has gone before," through its use in "Star Trek’s" title sequence.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital Solutions. Legal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

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WFMY News 2 13 October, 2021 - 05:32pm

Critical Flaw in OpenSea Could Have Let Hackers Steal Cryptocurrency From Wallets

CNN 13 October, 2021 - 05:32pm

A now-patched critical vulnerability in OpenSea, the world's largest non-fungible token (NFT) marketplace, could've been abused by malicious actors to drain cryptocurrency funds from a victim by sending a specially-crafted token, opening a new attack vector for exploitation.

The findings come from cybersecurity firm Check Point Research, which began an investigation into the platform following public reports of stolen cryptocurrency wallets triggered by free airdropped NFTs. The issues were fixed in less than one hour of responsible disclosure on September 26, 2021.

"Left unpatched, the vulnerabilities could allow hackers to hijack user accounts and steal entire cryptocurrency wallets by crafting malicious NFTs," Check Point researchers said.

As the name indicates, NFTs are unique digital assets such as photos, videos, audio, and other items that can be sold and traded on the blockchain, using the technology as a certificate of authenticity to establish a verified and public proof of ownership.

The modus operandi of the attack relies on sending victims a malicious NFT that, when clicked, results in a scenario whereby rogue transactions can be facilitated through a third-party wallet provider simply by providing a wallet signature to connect their wallets and perform actions on the targets' behalf. "Users should be hyper-aware of what they sign on OpenSea, as well as other NFT platforms, and whether it correlates with expected actions," the researchers said.

OpenSea said it hasn't identified any instances where this vulnerability was exploited in the wild but added it's working with third-party wallet services to "help users better identify malicious signature requests, as well as other initiatives to help users thwart scams and phishing attacks with greater efficacy."

"Blockchain innovation is fast-underway and NFTs are here to stay. Given the sheer pace of innovation, there is an inherent challenge in securely integrating software applications and crypto markets," said Oded Vanunu, head of products vulnerabilities research at Check Point. "Bad actors know they have an open window right now to take advantage of, with consumer adoption spiking, while security measures in this space still need to catch up."

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