'iPhone 13' Name Emerges on Alleged Packaging Stickers

Technology

MacRumors 26 August, 2021 - 05:42am 15 views

How much is the Iphone 13 going to cost?

So, for now, the expectation is that starting prices will hold steady at $699, $799, $999 and $1,099 for the respective models: iPhone 13 mini, iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max. Laptop MagiPhone 13: Price, release date, specs and more

Apple's new Android flagship-killer looks like iPhone 12 and costs as much as iPhone 12 Mini

PhoneArena 26 August, 2021 - 05:40pm

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Save on iPhone 12 5G with 12m plan

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Save on iPhone 12 5G with 12m plan

Apple iPhone 13 series name seemingly confirmed as details on new Face ID hardware leak

Notebookcheck.net 26 August, 2021 - 12:00am

Prosser states that Apple is conducting tests using a prototype case containing the new hardware that connects to an iPhone 12. Supposedly, Apple has created this case to minimise the volume of employees to whom it gives an unreleased iPhone. Presumably, the company has taken this step to minimise iPhone 13-related leaks.

According to McGuire Wood, the hardware contained within the case is 'the same as the one in the iPhone 13 series'. While Apple found workarounds for using Face ID and wearing a mask, the iPhone 13 series would be able to recognise you from face data where you did not have a mask or glasses on. If these features are not ready by the time that the iPhone 13 series launches, Apple could bundle them in software updates.

Separately, Wood also claims that the below photo of iPhone 13 labelling is real. Previously, it had been speculated that Apple would name its next smartphones the iPhone 12s series, a naming scheme that the company has used sporadically since 2015.

Apple iPhone 13 series name seemingly confirmed as details on new Face ID hardware leak

ZDNet 26 August, 2021 - 12:00am

Prosser states that Apple is conducting tests using a prototype case containing the new hardware that connects to an iPhone 12. Supposedly, Apple has created this case to minimise the volume of employees to whom it gives an unreleased iPhone. Presumably, the company has taken this step to minimise iPhone 13-related leaks.

According to McGuire Wood, the hardware contained within the case is 'the same as the one in the iPhone 13 series'. While Apple found workarounds for using Face ID and wearing a mask, the iPhone 13 series would be able to recognise you from face data where you did not have a mask or glasses on. If these features are not ready by the time that the iPhone 13 series launches, Apple could bundle them in software updates.

Separately, Wood also claims that the below photo of iPhone 13 labelling is real. Previously, it had been speculated that Apple would name its next smartphones the iPhone 12s series, a naming scheme that the company has used sporadically since 2015.

This Is Why So Many People Are Setting Their iPhone's Location To France

IFLScience 25 August, 2021 - 07:40am

People on the Internet appear to be setting their iPhone's location to France, despite not living there, in an attempt to speed up their devices. The "hack", which has received a lot of attention on Reddit and other social media networks, claims that it prevents the slowing of devices seen on many older iPhones.

Why? Well, according to a report from GizChina, it all stems back to a fine imposed on Apple by France's competition watchdog in 2020. The firm was fined 25 million euros ($27 million) last year for deliberately slowing older devices, without making it clear to consumers that installing updates would cause them to crawl. Apple confirmed in 2017 that they do slow older devices, stating that this is in order to increase the performance of the lithium-ion batteries as they age. 

"Electronic components require a minimum voltage to properly operate," the company wrote on their website, explaining that older batteries are less capable of delivering the charge needed for the new systems it operates.

"When the operations can no longer be supported with the full capabilities of the power management system, the system will perform a shutdown to preserve these electronic components. While this shutdown is intentional from the device perspective, it may be unexpected by the user."

And so when users downloaded upgrades to their older models of iPhone (the company says that this has changed from iPhone 8 onwards) they were downloading software that would slow down their phones, in order to prevent these shutdowns and other battery problems, which led some to accuse the firm of engaging in planned obsolescence

Users on the Internet, following the report from GizChina, believe that since the lawsuit in France, Apple have stopped this throttling of performance in the country, and so setting your own old iPhone's region to France will then disable the slowdown.

To do this, you need to:

As stated above, though this might work, it could cause you some battery issues and unexpected shutdowns, which you could find more annoying than your slower phone. In newer phones that run iOS 11.3 and above, Apple have battery health settings that will tell you if your battery is aging and needs to be replaced.

"Additionally, users can see if the performance management feature that dynamically manages maximum performance to prevent unexpected shutdowns is on and can choose to turn it off."

Changing your country on a newer iPhone however is pointless, but may make you feel a little fancy.

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