It Turns Out The "Foam Pads" In The Zelda Joy-Con Controllers Aren't New

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Nintendo Life 26 July, 2021 - 07:55pm 63 views

How long is Skyward Sword HD?

It should take you approximately 48 gameplay hours to finish the game with additional content. game8.coPlay Time: How Long to Beat | Zelda: Skyward Sword HD (Switch)|Game8

Earlier this month, we ran a story about someone who had supposedly come up with a solution for Joy-Con drift. In case you missed it, the fix requires you to insert a small square of paper or cardboard into the same spot as the analog stick locations in order to reapply pressure to the case of the controller. It's that simple, and so far seems to be working.

Now, a Nintendo Switch user by the name of @Mario_RPG_Fan on Twitter has opened up their brand new Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD controller (yes, someone actually did that) and has supposedly discovered two foam strips around the analog section of the case...

While it seems like this could potentially be an exciting fix, many other Switch fans have now highlighted how similar strips have also been spotted on much older Joy-Con. YouTuber Spawn Wave shared his own yellow Joy-Cons from a few years ago, alongside the new Legend of Zelda ones:

Fellow YouTuber Erica Griffin responded to this, noting how it's apparently been a "good while" since these "foam pads" have been in the Joy-Con, but they won't necessarily resolve the drift issues:

"I first saw them on my neon purple and orange joy-con, Oct 2019. I reshell these things all the time. It has the pads and still drifts a bit. *shrug* Silly fix for a multifaceted issue."

While these foam pads may have slightly improved Joy-Con controllers, it seems they're not necessarily the official fix everyone is hoping for...

[source twitter.com, via youtu.be, nintendoeverything.com]

About Liam Doolan

When he’s not paying off a loan to Tom Nook, Liam likes to report on the latest Nintendo news and admire his library of video games. His favourite Nintendo character used to be a guitar-playing dog, but nowadays he prefers to hang out with Judd the cat.

Comments (26)

hmm how am I. not surprised lol

Brave soul for opening up their JoyCon, but this'll be nice if this is actually the fix.

The video was posted three days before the SS Joy Cons were released, and the controllers were in production for several months if not more prior to that, so it's really just an interesting coincidence

Was his video put up early enough for them to manufacture these or did they do this on their own before his vid?

And after so many people thought they were being slick joking that these were gonna drift.

Nintendo would eventually fix it, the problem lies in how long it actually took...

Yeah, it's a weird comment that Nintendo saw a video from YouTube and maybe managed to open all of the joycons which were heading to retailers in order to add this. If this is the solution from Nintendo, it was implemented way before the video came out.

Maybe the video maker caught wind of this change already in the works?

Could Nintendo have secret agents within us who work to sway public opinion in favor of Nintendo?

give it like a few months and we'll see

Wait seriously! Now I’m even more mad that these are scalped like crazy.

@NEStalgia this is what I’m thinking too.

This is a risky move on their part because it could be used as an admission of guilt in the drift lawsuits.

I think it’s been fixed for a while now. I’m not opening mine up, but the replacement set I got from NOA when I sent my OG neons in 1.25 years ago are of higher quality, the shells are snug and don’t squeak like the old set, and most importantly; they don’t drift and definitely would by now (I’m hard on sticks). The pink/green set I bought at that time are the same way, much higher quality than the originals.

Hoping this works as I managed to get a set of the SS joy cons and they're luvverly, so I'll be so bummed if they start drifting.

(Though have watched the original "cardboard fix" vid and it seems legit too, so am ordering a set of tiny screwdrivers off eBay to try it on one of my originals that's started a-driftin' again.)

Another YouTuber found the actual weakness in the engineering for the joycons, along with a semi permanent fix:

Surprised you mention spawn wave, as he has mainly been debunked by the aforementioned video.

When I replaced shells on my OG model there were no foam pads. 🤷‍♂️

I'm hurt by the fact that this person just opened up a $60.00 set of Joy-Cons (with a special Zelda design no less!) as if it were nothing.

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The "Foam Pads" In The Zelda Joy-Con Controllers Aren't New

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 27 July, 2021 - 11:10pm

Earlier this month, we ran a story about someone who had supposedly come up with a solution for Joy-Con drift. In case you missed it, the fix requires you to insert a small square of paper or cardboard into the same spot as the analog stick locations in order to reapply pressure to the case of the controller. It's that simple, and so far seems to be working.

Now, a Nintendo Switch user by the name of @Mario_RPG_Fan on Twitter has opened up their brand new Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD controller (yes, someone actually did that) and discovered two foam strips around the analog section of the case...

While it seems like this could potentially be an exciting fix, since it 'blew up' online many other Switch fans have now highlighted how similar strips have also been spotted on much older Joy-Con. YouTuber Spawn Wave shared his own yellow Joy-Cons from a few years ago, alongside the new Legend of Zelda ones:

Fellow YouTuber Erica Griffin responded to this, noting how it's apparently been a "good while" since these "foam pads" have been in the Joy-Con, but they won't necessarily resolve the drift issues:

"I first saw them on my neon purple and orange joy-con, Oct 2019. I reshell these things all the time. It has the pads and still drifts a bit. *shrug* Silly fix for a multifaceted issue."

While these foam pads may have slightly improved Joy-Con controllers, it seems they're not necessarily the official fix everyone is hoping for...

[source twitter.com, via youtu.be, nintendoeverything.com]

About Liam Doolan

When he’s not paying off a loan to Tom Nook, Liam likes to report on the latest Nintendo news and admire his library of video games. His favourite Nintendo character used to be a guitar-playing dog, but nowadays he prefers to hang out with Judd the cat.

Comments (55)

hmm how am I. not surprised lol

Brave soul for opening up their JoyCon, but this'll be nice if this is actually the fix.

The video was posted three days before the SS Joy Cons were released, and the controllers were in production for several months if not more prior to that, so it's really just an interesting coincidence

Was his video put up early enough for them to manufacture these or did they do this on their own before his vid?

And after so many people thought they were being slick joking that these were gonna drift.

Nintendo would eventually fix it, the problem lies in how long it actually took...

Yeah, it's a weird comment that Nintendo saw a video from YouTube and maybe managed to open all of the joycons which were heading to retailers in order to add this. If this is the solution from Nintendo, it was implemented way before the video came out.

Maybe the video maker caught wind of this change already in the works?

Could Nintendo have secret agents within us who work to sway public opinion in favor of Nintendo?

give it like a few months and we'll see

Wait seriously! Now I’m even more mad that these are scalped like crazy.

@NEStalgia this is what I’m thinking too.

This is a risky move on their part because it could be used as an admission of guilt in the drift lawsuits.

I think it’s been fixed for a while now. I’m not opening mine up, but the replacement set I got from NOA when I sent my OG neons in 1.25 years ago are of higher quality, the shells are snug and don’t squeak like the old set, and most importantly; they don’t drift and definitely would by now (I’m hard on sticks). The pink/green set I bought at that time are the same way, much higher quality than the originals.

Hoping this works as I managed to get a set of the SS joy cons and they're luvverly, so I'll be so bummed if they start drifting.

(Though have watched the original "cardboard fix" vid and it seems legit too, so am ordering a set of tiny screwdrivers off eBay to try it on one of my originals that's started a-driftin' again.)

Another YouTuber found the actual weakness in the engineering for the joycons, along with a semi permanent fix:

Surprised you mention spawn wave, as he has mainly been debunked by the aforementioned video.

When I replaced shells on my OG model there were no foam pads. 🤷‍♂️

I'm hurt by the fact that this person just opened up a $60.00 set of Joy-Cons (with a special Zelda design no less!) as if it were nothing.

@tntswitchfan68 ok but hear me out here, i have about 6 different game consoles all in the same area some of which have had dust collect on the actual console, but none of the many controllers left there (including some of Nintendo’s old controllers) have ever drifted . I have my switch in a completely different area where there’s never been an issue with dust but my joy-cons drifted within a year and a half so I don’t think what you’re saying is true, it’s 100% an issue on Nintendo’s end

@tntswitchfan68 Nice piece of victim blaming there mate.

I've never had a single controller drift on me in 30 plus years until the joy-con came along. They are fundamentally broken.

If Nintendo have made them so vulnerable to dust that they can sit unused in a house and get it, that is still their problem.

Blaming consumers is just wrong. Nintendo are to blame for using cheap parts.

@Fujimoto-San Why? They are easy enough to open up and put back together.

@tntswitchfan68 Wow, victim blaming huh? I have hundreds of controllers that have got filled with dust and still work perfectly fine. My Joy Cons I've ALWAYS been careful with, and both of my pairs STILL DRIFTED multiple times. And even then, dust is EVERYWHERE, so Nintendo should have made a controller that's much more dust resistant, but nah, just blame the fans for not "taking care of the controllers" even though there's almost no damn way to avoid this problem because everyone has dust in their house of some capacity, and the controllers should have some sort of resistance against dust in the first place, like, notice how little people complained about the PS4, Xbox, Wii U, Wii, or even Switch Pro Controller drifted, because those cases aren't as bad/widespread as with the Joy Cons.

Even if YOU didn't have a problem with them, doesn't mean you never will, and that doesn't mean that other people haven't had the problem or are irresponsible.

Interesting idea, I really doubt this could be considered a definitive fix but it might make the stick lifecycle last longer.

...every Joy-Con I've ever opened to mod or repair (...starting early 2019) has had these two black-strips on the battery-tray ...I know this for sure because I tried, without success, to transfer them to the new battery-tray during a shell-swap ...I'd be more interested if someone had a pic of an OEM Joy-Con that "doesn't" have these strips. Actually, also wouldn't mind having a roll of this black-strip "tape" to make my shell-swaps a little more authentic.

I know they've been doing it since at least 2019. Which would confirm my suspicion that joycon released after the v2 Switch have a lower defective rate than early joycon.

I don't think you can ever truly eliminate it. That housing is going to wear eventually. But added pressure should at least extend mean time to failure. We've seen in the recent video how it can eliminate drift.

I tried it on my brother's joycon which had the most severe drift I've ever seen, and it worked. It still was off a tiny bit on calibration screen but not enough to register inputs. Before it was unusable. Now it works fine.

@Fujimoto-San no different to opening a fridge.

I recently got a Joy-Con replacement kit, and while I was changing the sticks, I realized changes were already made to newer Joy-Con sticks. I still had my launch day stick, and I noticed how the case of the stick has changed. Before, the case got a little bump, due to the part barely fitting on it. Now, the case comes with a little extra part in the middle, that's rounded and prevents the bump from occurring. Also, the case's arms are much more easier to open, so that the fix of the stick is easier to perform.

@The_New_Butler @scannerdarkly7 I'm terrible with machines. If I had bought these controllers I wouldn't even think about opening them up with my track record. I don't know how simple it is or how complicated but I find the thought unbearable ha ha!

@The_New_Butler Just being honest, mate. I let myself and my sister have it too. Is that the best response you can give?

@Dizzymario Hear me out. When we started taking care of our stuff, we haven't had any problems. Like it or not, all of this drift, (PS5, 4 and Xbox drift too), I am not saying that Nintendo didn't have any problem, but after awhile, you gotta ask yourself if drift was an enate problem, why didn't a lot of Joy Cons get them?

How immature of people to call someone names just for pointing out a fact. That people are somewhat to blame for the drifting problem. Dirt does effect the performance of the analog sticks, so try to protect them as much as you can.

@michellelynn0976 They aren't to blame though. The hardware is to blame 100% absolute no questions asked. Just because the failure rate isn't 100% doesn't mean it isn't the hardware.

Could some people treat their stuff better? Of course but as you will see if you go through any thread about this plenty claim to have never had issues with any other controller and claim to look after their stuff. Are they all lying?

And more pertinently, why would you rather back up a faceless corporation than your fellow gamers and consumers?

@tntswitchfan68 You aren't being honest. You are giving your opinion which is proven to be wrong.

The joy-con have a defect that causes unnecessary problems with many units and while I don't have figures that problem seems to appear in larger numbers and earlier than in most if not all other controllers with the Dualsense still to early to tell in my view.

@The_New_Butler Stop calling people dishonest when they have loved it. You just don't want to admit that some of the problems is on you. You don't have numbers? Then you must be lying right? See how that works?

The PS4 had over 36% of drift. But, no one here has had it. 🙄🙄 So try acting mature instead of calling people dishonest when the not problem with Joy Cons has been dust. Be more responsible.

@michellelynn0976 Can you link me to that percentage for PS4 controllers please? I have not seen those figures.

Although I should be clear it is irrelevant unless you have the Joy-con figures too.

When did I call someone dishonest? I replied to the comment "I'm just being honest". Honesty wasn't a factor in their unjustified opinion.

What is immature about anything I have said? The Joy-con have a problem. Many many people have suffered with said problem. Every outlet online has documented said problem.

But no you are the one who knows better.

It is nothing to do with dust. You can dismantle the whole controller clean it and get at best a temporary fix. The stick units are poorly made parts.

@The_New_Butler You just called someone dishonest. I heard the Switch was over 40%, all I am saying is, that it happens, not just to the Joy cons. Even then, I do not blame the company all the time.

@michellelynn0976 No I didn't I said they weren't being honest, they were giving an opinion. Being honest suggests there was something vaguely factual in what they said and not just conjecture based on their experience.

That article gives no indication of numbers. It gives no indication that PS4 was bad or whether it was something that was a problem and was fixed. Indeed the author who complains of having drift on the Dualshock 4 states that it was after years of use.

As for the Dualsense I have seen the stories but it is hard to know whether this is a problem with the controller or a bad batch or just a small number of cases being escalated into a furore online. Time will tell in that regard.

I have never once said it only happens to joy-con. I am aware that this is possible on virtually every analogue stick if not every single one and in fact I have posted exactly that on other discussions on this site.

However the one that appears to be the worst offender and goes very suddenly and without warning, some very early on and some much later are the joy-con - no lack of care or mis-use needed. This is Nintendo's problem and they should be taken to task on it. When others have similar problems they should also be pulled up on it in the same way.

If the Dualsense has the same issue or worse then I hope Sony get roasted for it.

None of this is new. PS3 controllers had an issue with the analog sticks that could be fixed by a small piece of foam or cardboard.

@tntswitchfan68 if a controller has that higher fail rate then I think it goes from being a user made issue to a Nintendo issue, no other controller has this much of an issue and like I explained, I take good care of my joy-cons and mine were still drifting within a year and a half (which is also a ridiculously short lifespan for drift compared to other controllers). Also to mention your point about the ps5 being the users fault, the controller is literally designed to wear away and cause drift after about 300 hours of playing so that’s definitely on Sony

@SalvorHardin what did they admit? Revisions of products come about all the time. Nintendo never said they were going to or did fix any drift issue.

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The "Foam Pads" In The Zelda Joy-Con Controllers Aren't New

Nintendo Life 27 July, 2021 - 11:10pm

Earlier this month, we ran a story about someone who had supposedly come up with a solution for Joy-Con drift. In case you missed it, the fix requires you to insert a small square of paper or cardboard into the same spot as the analog stick locations in order to reapply pressure to the case of the controller. It's that simple, and so far seems to be working.

Now, a Nintendo Switch user by the name of @Mario_RPG_Fan on Twitter has opened up their brand new Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD controller (yes, someone actually did that) and discovered two foam strips around the analog section of the case...

While it seems like this could potentially be an exciting fix, since it 'blew up' online many other Switch fans have now highlighted how similar strips have also been spotted on much older Joy-Con. YouTuber Spawn Wave shared his own yellow Joy-Cons from a few years ago, alongside the new Legend of Zelda ones:

Fellow YouTuber Erica Griffin responded to this, noting how it's apparently been a "good while" since these "foam pads" have been in the Joy-Con, but they won't necessarily resolve the drift issues:

"I first saw them on my neon purple and orange joy-con, Oct 2019. I reshell these things all the time. It has the pads and still drifts a bit. *shrug* Silly fix for a multifaceted issue."

While these foam pads may have slightly improved Joy-Con controllers, it seems they're not necessarily the official fix everyone is hoping for...

[source twitter.com, via youtu.be, nintendoeverything.com]

About Liam Doolan

When he’s not paying off a loan to Tom Nook, Liam likes to report on the latest Nintendo news and admire his library of video games. His favourite Nintendo character used to be a guitar-playing dog, but nowadays he prefers to hang out with Judd the cat.

Comments (55)

hmm how am I. not surprised lol

Brave soul for opening up their JoyCon, but this'll be nice if this is actually the fix.

The video was posted three days before the SS Joy Cons were released, and the controllers were in production for several months if not more prior to that, so it's really just an interesting coincidence

Was his video put up early enough for them to manufacture these or did they do this on their own before his vid?

And after so many people thought they were being slick joking that these were gonna drift.

Nintendo would eventually fix it, the problem lies in how long it actually took...

Yeah, it's a weird comment that Nintendo saw a video from YouTube and maybe managed to open all of the joycons which were heading to retailers in order to add this. If this is the solution from Nintendo, it was implemented way before the video came out.

Maybe the video maker caught wind of this change already in the works?

Could Nintendo have secret agents within us who work to sway public opinion in favor of Nintendo?

give it like a few months and we'll see

Wait seriously! Now I’m even more mad that these are scalped like crazy.

@NEStalgia this is what I’m thinking too.

This is a risky move on their part because it could be used as an admission of guilt in the drift lawsuits.

I think it’s been fixed for a while now. I’m not opening mine up, but the replacement set I got from NOA when I sent my OG neons in 1.25 years ago are of higher quality, the shells are snug and don’t squeak like the old set, and most importantly; they don’t drift and definitely would by now (I’m hard on sticks). The pink/green set I bought at that time are the same way, much higher quality than the originals.

Hoping this works as I managed to get a set of the SS joy cons and they're luvverly, so I'll be so bummed if they start drifting.

(Though have watched the original "cardboard fix" vid and it seems legit too, so am ordering a set of tiny screwdrivers off eBay to try it on one of my originals that's started a-driftin' again.)

Another YouTuber found the actual weakness in the engineering for the joycons, along with a semi permanent fix:

Surprised you mention spawn wave, as he has mainly been debunked by the aforementioned video.

When I replaced shells on my OG model there were no foam pads. 🤷‍♂️

I'm hurt by the fact that this person just opened up a $60.00 set of Joy-Cons (with a special Zelda design no less!) as if it were nothing.

@tntswitchfan68 ok but hear me out here, i have about 6 different game consoles all in the same area some of which have had dust collect on the actual console, but none of the many controllers left there (including some of Nintendo’s old controllers) have ever drifted . I have my switch in a completely different area where there’s never been an issue with dust but my joy-cons drifted within a year and a half so I don’t think what you’re saying is true, it’s 100% an issue on Nintendo’s end

@tntswitchfan68 Nice piece of victim blaming there mate.

I've never had a single controller drift on me in 30 plus years until the joy-con came along. They are fundamentally broken.

If Nintendo have made them so vulnerable to dust that they can sit unused in a house and get it, that is still their problem.

Blaming consumers is just wrong. Nintendo are to blame for using cheap parts.

@Fujimoto-San Why? They are easy enough to open up and put back together.

@tntswitchfan68 Wow, victim blaming huh? I have hundreds of controllers that have got filled with dust and still work perfectly fine. My Joy Cons I've ALWAYS been careful with, and both of my pairs STILL DRIFTED multiple times. And even then, dust is EVERYWHERE, so Nintendo should have made a controller that's much more dust resistant, but nah, just blame the fans for not "taking care of the controllers" even though there's almost no damn way to avoid this problem because everyone has dust in their house of some capacity, and the controllers should have some sort of resistance against dust in the first place, like, notice how little people complained about the PS4, Xbox, Wii U, Wii, or even Switch Pro Controller drifted, because those cases aren't as bad/widespread as with the Joy Cons.

Even if YOU didn't have a problem with them, doesn't mean you never will, and that doesn't mean that other people haven't had the problem or are irresponsible.

Interesting idea, I really doubt this could be considered a definitive fix but it might make the stick lifecycle last longer.

...every Joy-Con I've ever opened to mod or repair (...starting early 2019) has had these two black-strips on the battery-tray ...I know this for sure because I tried, without success, to transfer them to the new battery-tray during a shell-swap ...I'd be more interested if someone had a pic of an OEM Joy-Con that "doesn't" have these strips. Actually, also wouldn't mind having a roll of this black-strip "tape" to make my shell-swaps a little more authentic.

I know they've been doing it since at least 2019. Which would confirm my suspicion that joycon released after the v2 Switch have a lower defective rate than early joycon.

I don't think you can ever truly eliminate it. That housing is going to wear eventually. But added pressure should at least extend mean time to failure. We've seen in the recent video how it can eliminate drift.

I tried it on my brother's joycon which had the most severe drift I've ever seen, and it worked. It still was off a tiny bit on calibration screen but not enough to register inputs. Before it was unusable. Now it works fine.

@Fujimoto-San no different to opening a fridge.

I recently got a Joy-Con replacement kit, and while I was changing the sticks, I realized changes were already made to newer Joy-Con sticks. I still had my launch day stick, and I noticed how the case of the stick has changed. Before, the case got a little bump, due to the part barely fitting on it. Now, the case comes with a little extra part in the middle, that's rounded and prevents the bump from occurring. Also, the case's arms are much more easier to open, so that the fix of the stick is easier to perform.

@The_New_Butler @scannerdarkly7 I'm terrible with machines. If I had bought these controllers I wouldn't even think about opening them up with my track record. I don't know how simple it is or how complicated but I find the thought unbearable ha ha!

@The_New_Butler Just being honest, mate. I let myself and my sister have it too. Is that the best response you can give?

@Dizzymario Hear me out. When we started taking care of our stuff, we haven't had any problems. Like it or not, all of this drift, (PS5, 4 and Xbox drift too), I am not saying that Nintendo didn't have any problem, but after awhile, you gotta ask yourself if drift was an enate problem, why didn't a lot of Joy Cons get them?

How immature of people to call someone names just for pointing out a fact. That people are somewhat to blame for the drifting problem. Dirt does effect the performance of the analog sticks, so try to protect them as much as you can.

@michellelynn0976 They aren't to blame though. The hardware is to blame 100% absolute no questions asked. Just because the failure rate isn't 100% doesn't mean it isn't the hardware.

Could some people treat their stuff better? Of course but as you will see if you go through any thread about this plenty claim to have never had issues with any other controller and claim to look after their stuff. Are they all lying?

And more pertinently, why would you rather back up a faceless corporation than your fellow gamers and consumers?

@tntswitchfan68 You aren't being honest. You are giving your opinion which is proven to be wrong.

The joy-con have a defect that causes unnecessary problems with many units and while I don't have figures that problem seems to appear in larger numbers and earlier than in most if not all other controllers with the Dualsense still to early to tell in my view.

@The_New_Butler Stop calling people dishonest when they have loved it. You just don't want to admit that some of the problems is on you. You don't have numbers? Then you must be lying right? See how that works?

The PS4 had over 36% of drift. But, no one here has had it. 🙄🙄 So try acting mature instead of calling people dishonest when the not problem with Joy Cons has been dust. Be more responsible.

@michellelynn0976 Can you link me to that percentage for PS4 controllers please? I have not seen those figures.

Although I should be clear it is irrelevant unless you have the Joy-con figures too.

When did I call someone dishonest? I replied to the comment "I'm just being honest". Honesty wasn't a factor in their unjustified opinion.

What is immature about anything I have said? The Joy-con have a problem. Many many people have suffered with said problem. Every outlet online has documented said problem.

But no you are the one who knows better.

It is nothing to do with dust. You can dismantle the whole controller clean it and get at best a temporary fix. The stick units are poorly made parts.

@The_New_Butler You just called someone dishonest. I heard the Switch was over 40%, all I am saying is, that it happens, not just to the Joy cons. Even then, I do not blame the company all the time.

@michellelynn0976 No I didn't I said they weren't being honest, they were giving an opinion. Being honest suggests there was something vaguely factual in what they said and not just conjecture based on their experience.

That article gives no indication of numbers. It gives no indication that PS4 was bad or whether it was something that was a problem and was fixed. Indeed the author who complains of having drift on the Dualshock 4 states that it was after years of use.

As for the Dualsense I have seen the stories but it is hard to know whether this is a problem with the controller or a bad batch or just a small number of cases being escalated into a furore online. Time will tell in that regard.

I have never once said it only happens to joy-con. I am aware that this is possible on virtually every analogue stick if not every single one and in fact I have posted exactly that on other discussions on this site.

However the one that appears to be the worst offender and goes very suddenly and without warning, some very early on and some much later are the joy-con - no lack of care or mis-use needed. This is Nintendo's problem and they should be taken to task on it. When others have similar problems they should also be pulled up on it in the same way.

If the Dualsense has the same issue or worse then I hope Sony get roasted for it.

None of this is new. PS3 controllers had an issue with the analog sticks that could be fixed by a small piece of foam or cardboard.

@tntswitchfan68 if a controller has that higher fail rate then I think it goes from being a user made issue to a Nintendo issue, no other controller has this much of an issue and like I explained, I take good care of my joy-cons and mine were still drifting within a year and a half (which is also a ridiculously short lifespan for drift compared to other controllers). Also to mention your point about the ps5 being the users fault, the controller is literally designed to wear away and cause drift after about 300 hours of playing so that’s definitely on Sony

@SalvorHardin what did they admit? Revisions of products come about all the time. Nintendo never said they were going to or did fix any drift issue.

Hold on there, you need to login to post a comment...

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Did Nintendo Use Popular Youtuber Trick To Fix Joy-Con Drift in Skyward Sword Joy-Cons?

DualShockers 26 July, 2021 - 10:27pm

Everything else aside, one of the issues that have been affecting Switch owners since the beginning is Joy-con drift. For those who are unaware, Joy-con drift is a term given to one of the issues in the Joy-cons, wherein they start registering movements even when they aren’t used.

Basically, if you have a Joy-Con which is automatically taking analog stick inputs in the game even when you are not using it, you are a victim of Joy-con drift. The most surprising fact is that Nintendo is aware of this issue for years now, and there have been little efforts made to improve it at all.

Many would believe an improved version of Switch would fix these issues, but that didn’t prove to be true either. In fact, the Switch OLED doesn’t include a fix for this annoying issue which has been present for ages, and Nintendo even refuses to comment about why it is the way it is.

Amidst all that, a popular Youtuber VK had made a video on Youtube suggesting a very simple workaround for this archaic issue. All players need to do is simply place a piece of cardboard inside the Joy-con and the issue would be fixed. The fact that it proved to be useful for many proves that fix indeed works.

These pads have been here for ages. Unfortunately it's not anything new, nor has it 100% solved the issue. I have multiple shell sets from all sorts of periods prior to last week that have these pads, some I got cheap because they were drifting. pic.twitter.com/4mceIc39uz

Now, a tweet has been going viral which states that Nintendo has taken inspiration from this Youtuber and incorporated this fix in their latest Joycons. As spotted by Chicken Noodle Gamer, the Skyward Sword Joy-Cons come with strips attached which is quite similar to what VK suggests in his video. It is also noted that previously, none of the Joycons have anything like this included.

However, upon further digging up, it seems like there are quite a number of flaws to this claim. Firstly, it is quite impossible that Nintendo took inspiration from VK, considering the fact that his video was released on the 14th, while the Skyward Sword Joy-Cons was released on July 16th. It takes weeks for products to go from manufacturing to retail, so we can pretty much assume this claim to be fake.

Secondly, a number of users on Twitter have reported that this strip has been present in their own Joy-Cons as well, which are not the Skyward Sword Joy-Cons. This basically clears up all the air regarding the rumors, and it seems like the strips are basically something that is present in some Joy-Cons, and not a new addition at all.

Well, at least it made fans optimistic for a bit thinking that the plagued Joy-Con drift is gone, for once.

Nintendo may have updated Joy-Con design to prevent drift with new The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword model | Dot Esports

Dot Esports 26 July, 2021 - 07:18pm

One of the main complaints about the Nintendo Switch is the tendency for its main controllers, the Joy-Con, to malfunction and develop a drift that causes the analog sticks to randomly move and input commands to the console. 

In one of its newer product releases, however, it appears that Nintendo might have quietly found a way to eliminate one of its system’s biggest problems. In the new pair of limited edition Joy-Con that were released alongside The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD earlier this month, one Twitter user noticed that there are now strips of material previously not included in other Joy-Con models. These strips are positioned in the same area that a YouTuber noted the pressure needed to consistently be applied, and look to be doing that job. 

Thanks to youtuber VK its known that pressure to the back of a joycon control stick stops drift. I opened my Zelda joycons and noticed strips, theyre not in any joycons me or others have seen. Please share this post. It seems nintendo fixed their biggest issue behind the scenes pic.twitter.com/FgDS1Prh11

For the past few years, players have tried plenty of different methods to fix the issue, with some seeing success by adding simple elements to the controller. The most recent method that has been used came from YouTube VK, who showed that, by applying consistent pressure to an area of the drifting Joy-Con, the problem could be fixed on a seemingly permanent basis. 

VK achieved this by placing a piece of thin cardboard directly into the controller’s casing at a specific point. 

Only time will tell if this method actually holds up or if the strips included in this new model actually fix Joy-Con drift permanently. We also don’t know if these strips are going to be included in every model of Joy-Con from this point on, including those shipped with the new Nintendo Switch OLED model in October.

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