Jake Lacy’s Change of Pace

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Vulture 26 July, 2021 - 07:00am 58 views

When does new White Lotus come out?

Release. The miniseries premiered on July 11, 2021 on HBO. wikipedia.orgThe White Lotus

FRANKLIN, Tenn. (WKRN) — A conservative radio talk show host from Tennessee is hospitalized with COVID-19, according to his family.

In a statement released Thursday, relatives said Phil Valentine is “in very serious condition” and is suffering from “Covid pneumonia,” along with other side effects.

He is in the critical care unit of a Nashville area hospital breathing with assistance, but is not on a ventilator, his family wrote.

Valentine, who hosts The Phil Valentine Show on Nashville’s SuperTalk 99.7 WTN, confirmed July 11 on his Facebook page that he had tested positive for COVID. He spoke about his battle with the virus on his radio show.

“I think I’m on the other side of it,” Valentine said of the virus, as he described coughing, congestion, and fatigue that “hurts like crap.”

He added, “I’m certainly moving forward, it appears, but not in a straight line… It’s just one of those things. I don’t want it to linger on.”

Valentine has expressed his disagreement with Nashville’s response to the coronavirus, including COVID-19 safety guidelines and closures. He has also been critical of the vaccine, voicing his concerns over safety.

“Phil would like for his listeners to know that while he has never been an ‘anti-vaxer’ he regrets not being more vehemently ‘Pro-Vaccine’ and looks forward to being able to more vigorously advocate that position as soon as he is back on the air, which we all hope will be soon,” his family wrote in their statement.

Their statement concluded, “Phil & his family would like for all of you to know that he loves y’all and appreciates your concern, thoughts & prayers more than you will ever know. Please continue to pray for his recovery and PLEASE GO GET VACCINATED!”

Mark Valentine, Phil Valentine’s brother, posted on Facebook:

Many of you know that my brother Phil is in the hospital with Covid related pneumonia. He is fighting for his life, which has persuaded me to get vaccinated when I was previously not inclined to do so. I haven’t posted anything pro or con relating to the vaccine because I felt like everyone should decide for themselves whether or not to get it. Having seen this up close and personal I’d encourage ALL of you to put politics and other concerns aside and get it. When the technician came out and asked…’do you have any questions or concerns about the vaccine’, I said hell yeah but I’m gonna get it anyway.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

McRAE, Ark. (KARK) – A dog named Razzle disappeared from his Arkansas home more than ten years ago.

While his family kept him in their hearts, they had no idea what might have happened to their beloved pooch — until they received a phone call recently from 1,900 miles away in California. They're now anxiously awaiting an emotional reunion a decade after the disappearance.

Read full article at Vulture

The White Lotus Recap: Sex Talks

Vulture 25 July, 2021 - 09:00pm

The Pattons are tiffing again, this time because Shane wants to have sex. It’s not that Rachel doesn’t want to have sex — though sometimes she doesn’t want to — but that she wants Shane to want to have sex less. Until, that is, he says he doesn’t want to have sex, in which case she looks hurt until he admits that he actually would in fact like to have sex. Honestly, this horndog discourse is hard for me to buy. The newlyweds have so far ended each evening with a bang, but otherwise it’s pretty chaste between them.

In “Mysterious Monkeys,” they also have morning sex, which appears mutually satisfying if perhaps perfunctory. Rachel’s not fully undressed and there’s no post-coital cuddle, but no judgment here, the breakfast buffet probably ends at 10. So I was as thrown as Rachel’s polo shirt of a husband to hear she’s unhappy with the central role sex is playing in their relationship. “I can’t wait to fuck in Tahiti” isn’t the most romantic sweet-nothing I’ve ever heard, but how much sex is too much on day three of marriage? Rachel is looking for a fight, desperate to find cracks in the relationship to justify her second thoughts. It’s hardly necessary! There’s a surfeit of obvious reasons not to be with this dude, like his complete disregard for her career, his reliance on his mother to solve his problems, and how long it’s taking him to finish Blink. Still, her criticism sends Shane on a quest to show he’s more than an erection with a black card.

At least the Pattons are doing it on vacation. The Mossbachers are nowhere close. There are mood-killers, of course: their daughter’s derision, their son’s tech/porn addiction, Nicole’s workaholism, and Mark’s existential crisis. When Rachel asks Mark how the Mossbachers keep “the spark alive,” his candor is more disconcerting than Shane’s libido. In the beginning, Mark couldn’t get enough of Nicole; now, he compares sex to a food challenge on Fear Factor, a show on which I saw a person drink the juice from a cow’s eyeball. But radical honesty is Mark’s new watchword. He doesn’t even flinch when his teenage son overhears.

Because honesty, Mark declares, is going to be the difference between Mark and his own dad, the one we learned died from AIDS. Steve Zahn, who refuses to recede into his character for me, wakes up stupefied from the news, leaving his wife to explain the situation to the kids. The girls are predictably merciless. They only see the homophobia in Mark’s reaction when really he’s grieving the loss of a fictional childhood, plus also being homophobic. “Maybe he was just too embarrassed to ask grandma to use a dildo on him?” suggests Olivia, who is maaaybe trying to help? But there’s an unmissable twinkle in her eye when she informs her parents that grandad “was probably a bottom. That’s how you mostly get it — receiving.” She’s perpetually thrilled with her own worldly knowledge, mistaking it for a reason why her opinions are the most correct. Mark has Bloody Marys for breakfast until it’s time for day one of scuba school.

Which brings us to poor, suffering Quinn. Kicked out of the hotel suite by his sister, he spent the night sleeping under a canopy of stars. It was magical until the tide washed away his many, many devices. His mom orders replacements that can’t make it to the island in time, but this is Maui, not the edge of civilization. He’s a 20-minute Uber from Target — give the kid a credit card. Phoneless and Switchless, Quinn has no refuge from his dad’s unfiltered truth, or at least what Mark thinks the truth is. It’s fascinating to see how quickly Mark bends the new information about his dad into a self-serving narrative. He believed he was the “flawed child of an icon”; now, he’s using his dad’s secrets to excuse his shortcomings. “He hid the monkey and that screwed me up.” To save Quinn, Mark is going to tell the truth, and the truth is mostly frank sex talk with anyone who will listen. Later, Nicole explains to her daughter over family dinner that, as you get older, you come to value your dignity more than sex — a revealing set of counterpoints. Mark doesn’t hear because he’s still at the bar, accidentally propositioning Armond, who has enjoyed 400–500 pau hana drinks.

Armond’s sinking fast since busting open the dispensary of Paula’s lost bag. Belinda finds him asleep in his car. He can’t stop hitting on Dillon, a young staffer with an aesthetic that screams “my beat-up Toyota is covered in bumper stickers.” (Armie likes his top knot.) And just when it seems the Pineapple Suite fiasco is over, a reckless Armond can’t resist the chance to escalate. He books the Pattons onto the hotel boat for sunset dinner on the same night Tanya is planning to scatter her mother’s remains. An Armond with a stash and a vendetta is a dangerous thing. Honeymoons will be scorched.

As good as Murray Bartlett is at playing a man buzzing with Adderall and schadenfreude, this week’s MVP is hands-down Jennifer Coolidge, who takes boozy Tanya from fragile to fractured over a case of champagne. Tanya feels like a fuller version of other characters that Coolidge has played — washed-up and spaced out, simultaneously puerile and battered — but with backstory enough to justify her sadness. She had an oppressive, collapsed relationship with her “cruel” mother that even the woman’s death can’t end. She dreams that she’s wading into the chest-high sea, throwing handfuls of ashes into an on-shore wind that blows them back into her face. Her mourning is hysterical in every sense of the word. “I wish I had a man here,” she says, watching Rachel and Shane over dinner. Belinda, whom Tanya’s compelled to leave work early to join her, agrees. These women are bad bedfellows: Belinda is pathologically empathic, and Tanya’s distress seems to blossom when she has witnesses.

In a shrewd metaphor, Tanya can’t even get the urn open herself. On the boat, she breaks down crying and screaming before the ashes can be emptied. She’ll probably carry them with her forever. As the boat sails back to The White Lotus, the shell-shocked Pattons clutch each other close, and Belinda sings to Tanya, scratching her head like the child she’ll never outgrow.

The White Lotus stalls by focusing on the stagnant Mossbacher marriage

The A.V. Club 25 July, 2021 - 09:00pm

But there’s also a narrative imbalance in this episode, in particular with how we explore the lives of Armond and Belinda, that makes me wonder whether The White Lotus will, in its remaining three episodes, deliberately and purposefully spend as much time with the resort staff as it does with its guests. I don’t mean to flatten a classist critique here and say that the series should make the working-class Armond and Belinda heroes and the wealthy guests villains. To Mike White’s credit, the show is doing a fair job already showing how selfish some of these people are (cough, Shane) as a result of their wealth, and how vulnerable some of these people are (cough, Tanya) in spite of it.

My point more so is that the show has now positioned Armond and Shane as equal chaos agents, meeting each other tit for tat, and also configured Armond as an antagonist toward Olivia and Paula, who want their drugs back and who are increasingly disbelieving of Armond’s insistence that they haven’t been found. All we definitively know about Armond, though, is that he’s worked at the White Lotus for a while, was five years sober, and is gay. Is that enough to stand up to all the narrative twisting and turning the show is doing around him? Murray Bartlett is certainly chameleon-like, and that comes through in both his hitting-on-unsuspecting-guys scenes: during his cocksure confidence with Zahn’s Mark, in which his winking innuendo is mostly amusing, and then in that blunt proposition of employee Dillon (Lukas Gage), which is predatory from top to bottom. And sure, it’s enjoyable to watch someone finally be a thorn in the side of these (mostly) intolerable, spoiled people. But I wonder if the story can sustain Armond’s villainy long term, especially when the character’s slide into addiction and manic behavior is ultimately self-destructive. (Is it “gaslighting,” as Shane insists? I’m going to go with … no.)

So all that is a bit of a flaw in “Mysterious Monkeys,” as is what feels like repetition in Mark’s progression. On the one hand, Zahn is the guy to dig into the radical honesty that Mark’s character now adopts after learning about his father’s double life. He can say the most non sequitur lines with unexpected solemnity (“Leprosy is no joke”) and can self-effacingly, cluelessly ramble on without any sense of how self-involved he’s really being (“Just hold my nose and, like, suck it down as fast as I can, so I don’t gag,” when describing sex with wife Nicole). On the other hand, the destruction of Mark’s personal identity as a result of the reveal of his father’s sexual orientation, and his cynical belief that life is just one slog during which we are “driven by base instincts to create these hierarchies and hump each other,” seems like The White Lotus attempting to mirror Mark with his daughter Olivia, and present two different angles of a certain kind of privileged, naval-gazing worldview.

Olivia makes these grand critical assessments of everything and everyone, including her parents, but has no personality of her own outside of that dislike. Nu-Mark mimics her with his “honest” assessment of the world around him and his admittance that he’s basically checked out of his marriage, but has no personality of his own outside of that dislike. And although Nicole is very clearly an aggressive helicopter parent (that speech about her straight white son being a victim of sex shaming!), her character lacks a bit of dynamism, too. Overall, the Mossbacher-marriage stuff feels slightly stagnant three episodes in, and neither Connie Britton’s expectedly fabulous hair nor Zahn’s gameness has yet enlivened it.

“Mysterious Monkeys” begins with a secret: Paula has been hooking up with resort employee Kai, who Olivia saw her eyeing up at dinner, and Paula has been lying about it. (Again, my old ass asks: Are Paula and Olivia a couple and this is romantic jealousy, or are we dealing with a codependent-best-friends situation?) There’s an uncomfortable vibe all throughout the resort that morning: Olivia’s mistrust when she realizes Paula isn’t telling her the truth about Kai, Quinn’s anger when he wakes up to find that the ocean drenched his phone and tablet, Rachel’s exasperated look when Shane initiates morning sex. You know a few days into a vacation, when you’re tired, sunburnt, and running out of clean clothes, and you begin wondering when you can go home? Suddenly the guests we’re following at the White Lotus are in that headspace, although they’re in one of the most beautiful places in the world and are being waited on hand and foot. Must be nice!

We see that tension build in nearly every character pairing. Shane, ignoring that Rachel is still smarting over his dismissal of her career and more irritated that his new wife thinks he isn’t romantic, for some reason turns to Armond for advice, as if he hasn’t been putting forth very discernibly hostile vibes toward Armond this whole time. Armond, seizing the opportunity to screw over Shane, pairs them up on the same boat with Tanya, who has decided tonight is the night to spread her mother’s ashes in the water. Meanwhile, Tanya asks Belinda to accompany her, and I can’t quite tell if Tanya knows that her offer of funding Belinda’s wellness center has basically ensnared the White Lotus spa manager, but Jennifer Coolidge excels at the pregnant pause. If she waits just a little bit—just long enough to make the other person uncomfortable—chances are they’ll do what she wants. And so Belinda joins Tanya, who probably assumes that this ritual will be like her poolside dream: celebratory, freeing, tranquil.

The same question applies to the Mossbacher children, I think. To Olivia, who stands a little too long and a little too obviously in front of Paula and Kai as they have sex (would a fancy resort really be so abandoned in the middle of the night? I am not rich, I do not know), and whose stride away from that scene suggests a very bad reaction indeed. How does she progress past what she clearly sees as a profound betrayal? And to Quinn, whose passionate insistence that he receive a replacement phone and tablet for the ones destroyed during his night on the beach results in him borrowing his parents’ phones, and then throwing one of them into the sand when porn fails to hold his interest. (Does the fact that it’s porn involving women have anything to do with his apathy?) If the only thing that is keeping Quinn interested in the world around him are its natural wonders—the whales, the waves—then maybe it’s worth asking how the teen moves on from his listlessness and, possibly, his depression. If you can become another person in another place, who will Quinn become?

'The White Lotus' Season 2: Director Mike White Worries About Making It

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 25 July, 2021 - 08:03pm

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The main point of The White Lotus on HBO is also the main reason that Mike White is unsure he wants to create a season 2. In a behind-the-scenes interview, the cast and crew gave their insight about privilege and class as it’s portrayed in the series.

White Lotus is about the problems that people think they have in comparison to real problems in the world,” Rachel Daddario explained in the YouTube video.

As the series continues, the Mossbacher family begins to show their true colors. Olivia Mossbacher (Sydney Sweeney) brought her friend, Paula (Brittany O’Grady), along with her family to Hawaii. However, Olivia’s family is white and doesn’t realize how offensive their comments are.

“Oliva’s family benefits from privilege and a system that oppresses other people,” O’Grady explained. “Their ignorance about it starts to rub Paula the wrong way.”

White added that to create the “contemporary show,” he needed to “touch on issues of gender, and race, and class.” The White Lotus does all of those things; however, the filmmaker wonders if he is a hypocrite for creating a season 2?

Director Mike White’s major problem with creating The White Lotus Season 2 is that he might be acting like the privileged characters in the series. The director worries that taking the limited series into another season might be greedy. The filmmaker compares it to the time he flew back to Maui to check into the Four Seasons to screen the new HBO Max series. The front desk staff told White his room wouldn’t be ready for several hours. He recalled to Vanity Fair that he wanted to scream.

“I am the one that kept you guys afloat for months,” the director remembers thinking. However, he realized he might sound like the privileged characters he created for The White Lotus. “Oh, my God, I cannot be this guy,” he thought to himself. “You definitely don’t want to be that guy.”

His ideas for The White Lotus Season 2 include filming in another luxurious location, like France or Japan. However, the filmmaker doesn’t want to take advantage of his good fortune.

If HBO gives White the greenlight, he does have plans for The White Lotus Season 2. Despite his worries over taking advantage of his privilege, he’s ready for another round of the limited series.

“My hope is that maybe HBO will want to do another round of White Lotus,” the director told The New Yorker. “I feel like it might take place at a sister hotel, a different kind of seasonal thing. I think there’s another season in me that kind of has a different way into this that I think would be cool if they’d let me do this.”

The main point of The White Lotus on HBO is also the main reason that Mike White is unsure he wants to create a season 2. In a behind-the-scenes interview, the cast and crew gave their insight about privilege and class as it’s portrayed in the series.

White Lotus is about the problems that people think they have in comparison to real problems in the world,” Rachel Daddario explained in the YouTube video.

As the series continues, the Mossbacher family begins to show their true colors. Olivia Mossbacher (Sydney Sweeney) brought her friend, Paula (Brittany O’Grady), along with her family to Hawaii. However, Olivia’s family is white and doesn’t realize how offensive their comments are.

“Oliva’s family benefits from privilege and a system that oppresses other people,” O’Grady explained. “Their ignorance about it starts to rub Paula the wrong way.”

White added that to create the “contemporary show,” he needed to “touch on issues of gender, and race, and class.” The White Lotus does all of those things; however, the filmmaker wonders if he is a hypocrite for creating a season 2?

Director Mike White’s major problem with creating The White Lotus Season 2 is that he might be acting like the privileged characters in the series. The director worries that taking the limited series into another season might be greedy. The filmmaker compares it to the time he flew back to Maui to check into the Four Seasons to screen the new HBO Max series. The front desk staff told White his room wouldn’t be ready for several hours. He recalled to Vanity Fair that he wanted to scream.

“I am the one that kept you guys afloat for months,” the director remembers thinking. However, he realized he might sound like the privileged characters he created for The White Lotus. “Oh, my God, I cannot be this guy,” he thought to himself. “You definitely don’t want to be that guy.”

His ideas for The White Lotus Season 2 include filming in another luxurious location, like France or Japan. However, the filmmaker doesn’t want to take advantage of his good fortune.

If HBO gives White the greenlight, he does have plans for The White Lotus Season 2. Despite his worries over taking advantage of his privilege, he’s ready for another round of the limited series.

“My hope is that maybe HBO will want to do another round of White Lotus,” the director told The New Yorker. “I feel like it might take place at a sister hotel, a different kind of seasonal thing. I think there’s another season in me that kind of has a different way into this that I think would be cool if they’d let me do this.”

'The White Lotus': Alexandra Daddario Lucked Her Way Into the Cast

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 25 July, 2021 - 07:45pm

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Filmed at an actual resort in Hawaii, The White Lotus took form in an unusual way. In an interview with Vanity Fair, Mike White, who wrote and directed the limited series, revealed that HBO executives actually approached him about making a show under very specific parameters. Because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, they wanted a drama that could be shot quickly in one singular location in order to minimize safety risks. While this may have been a challenging request for some, White lept at the chance to get back to work.

“I’ll do whatever,” White told HBO. “I want to work. I just can’t sit and watch the world burn!” Only two months later White had created The White Lotus and was in Hawaii shooting with his talented cast. In keeping with HBO’s restrictions for the show, the cast was not allowed to leave the resort where they were filming and were instead quarantined there until the show wrapped. Funnily enough, this bled into the feeling of the show, one cast member even referring to the experience as a tropical version of The Shining.

According to White, the idea for The White Lotus came from feelings of anxiety that sometimes arose on his own vacations. “I’m in this beautiful location away from all my problems,” White shared. “So why am I having this existential dread all day long?” It’s clear where the concept of The White Lotus came from, but how did the writer manage to score such a great cast? While some actors, like Sweeney, had to audition for their roles, others, like, Alexandra Daddario, were offered their roles outright.

White had seen Daddario’s previous work and felt she’d be great for the role of Rachel. And while some people chalk the casting up to merit, Daddario believes that she lucked into the role. In an interview with Collider, the actor explained how she ended up with a lead role in The White Lotus cast.

“Well, when I took The White Lotus I think — I mean it was in the middle of the pandemic,” Daddario shared. “I didn’t expect to work at all and um it kind of just fell in my lap. Working with Mike White was a dream. He’s an amazing director and the project, it really — the material really spoke to me and my sensibilities. And dark comedy and the social commentary and all. I really believed in the project but there wasn’t anything tactical about it except ‘Wow, what a great job to get in the middle of the pandemic, and it shoots in Hawaii. That’s great, let’s do it.’ You know?”

Continuing on, Daddario gushed about how great it was to work with White. “Mike White’s amazing,” she shared. “I’m really really — I’m really really — uh this was a luck one. I’m really grateful to be a part of it. It’s a really cool story. I had a great time with the character.” We’re sure fans are itching to see what’s next for Daddario’s character. The third episode of The White Lotus premieres tonight at 9 PM EST on HBO.

The White Lotus is certainly shaping up to be one of the must-see shows of the Summer. The HBO limited series follows a group of vacationers and employees at The White Lotus Resort and Spa in Hawaii and the series of bizarre events that take place within just a week’s time. Though the show is less straightforward than others stylistically, its dynamic cast has already earned it some attention. Natasha Rothwell, Connie Britton, Steve Zahn, Jennifer Coolidge, Molly Shannon, Alexandra Daddario, Jake Lacy, Sydney Sweeney, and more all lend their talents to the social commentary.

Filmed at an actual resort in Hawaii, The White Lotus took form in an unusual way. In an interview with Vanity Fair, Mike White, who wrote and directed the limited series, revealed that HBO executives actually approached him about making a show under very specific parameters. Because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, they wanted a drama that could be shot quickly in one singular location in order to minimize safety risks. While this may have been a challenging request for some, White lept at the chance to get back to work.

“I’ll do whatever,” White told HBO. “I want to work. I just can’t sit and watch the world burn!” Only two months later White had created The White Lotus and was in Hawaii shooting with his talented cast. In keeping with HBO’s restrictions for the show, the cast was not allowed to leave the resort where they were filming and were instead quarantined there until the show wrapped. Funnily enough, this bled into the feeling of the show, one cast member even referring to the experience as a tropical version of The Shining.

According to White, the idea for The White Lotus came from feelings of anxiety that sometimes arose on his own vacations. “I’m in this beautiful location away from all my problems,” White shared. “So why am I having this existential dread all day long?” It’s clear where the concept of The White Lotus came from, but how did the writer manage to score such a great cast? While some actors, like Sweeney, had to audition for their roles, others, like, Alexandra Daddario, were offered their roles outright.

White had seen Daddario’s previous work and felt she’d be great for the role of Rachel. And while some people chalk the casting up to merit, Daddario believes that she lucked into the role. In an interview with Collider, the actor explained how she ended up with a lead role in The White Lotus cast.

“Well, when I took The White Lotus I think — I mean it was in the middle of the pandemic,” Daddario shared. “I didn’t expect to work at all and um it kind of just fell in my lap. Working with Mike White was a dream. He’s an amazing director and the project, it really — the material really spoke to me and my sensibilities. And dark comedy and the social commentary and all. I really believed in the project but there wasn’t anything tactical about it except ‘Wow, what a great job to get in the middle of the pandemic, and it shoots in Hawaii. That’s great, let’s do it.’ You know?”

Continuing on, Daddario gushed about how great it was to work with White. “Mike White’s amazing,” she shared. “I’m really really — I’m really really — uh this was a luck one. I’m really grateful to be a part of it. It’s a really cool story. I had a great time with the character.” We’re sure fans are itching to see what’s next for Daddario’s character. The third episode of The White Lotus premieres tonight at 9 PM EST on HBO.

What's Your Fancy?: The White Lotus's Alexandra Daddario on Her Hawaiian Travel Essentials

TownandCountrymag.com 25 July, 2021 - 01:01pm

While quarantined in Hawaii filming the series, Daddario re-read The Great Gatsby and doubled up on sunscreen.

"It's satirical," Daddario says of the show. "I'm not a comedian, but this humor, I think comes from reality. A lot of life, as dark and tragic and horrible as it [can be], is very funny."

What Time Is 'The White Lotus' on HBO and How Can You Watch It?

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 25 July, 2021 - 09:18am

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Mare of Easttown fans might be pleasantly surprised to find that The White Lotus airs at the same time as the HBO miniseries did. The White Lotus airs on HBO at 9 p.m. EST on Sundays throughout July and August. Viewers with the HBO app and the HBO Max app can stream the new series at 9 p.m. For users with only HBO Max, the new episodes become available right at 9 p.m. when the series airs live on HBO.

The White Lotus will air with a total of six episodes, all airing on HBO in that same time frame: 9 p.m. EST. The miniseries premiered on HBO on July 11 and will continue through mid-August. Fans can expect The White Lotus finale to air Sunday, Aug. 15, at 9 p.m. EST. Finally, here is a breakdown of the episode titles and air dates:

Episode 1 — “Arrivals” (July 11)

Episode 2 — “New Day” (July 18)

Episode 3 — “Mysterious Monkeys” (July 25)

Episode 4 — “Recentering” (Aug. 1)

Episode 5 — “The Lotus-Eaters” (Aug. 8)

Episode 6 — “Departures” (Aug. 15)

Fans of the HBO series Succession and Mare of Easttown enjoy this similar new show, The White Lotus. Director Mike White wanted the new limited HBO series to seem similar to Succession, however, at a more relatable level. The wealthy guests at the resort aren’t billionaires like the Roy family, but they are rich people who still benefit from the class they live in. 

The White Lotus also delves into the lives of the resort staff, including manager Armond (Murray Bartlett) and spa manager Belinda (Natasha Rothwell). They try to put on a constant smile, but within the first few episodes, it’s evident that the stress of running the resort is getting to Armond. Lone traveler Tanya McQuoid (Jennifer Coolidge) becomes increasingly interested in keeping Belinda for herself. However, she’s not versed in authentic relationships. Instead, she attempts to throw money at the woman, insisting that Belinda might be better off owning her own business rather than behind the resort desk.

Meanwhile, money and wealth interfere with the newlyweds’ marriage as well. Shane Patton (Jake Lacy) insists that his bride, Rachel (Alexandra Daddario), stop working because her “situation has changed.” She married into a wealthy family, so she should relax. The comments about money don’t sit well with Rachel, who still wants to have a career. 

Plus, there’s an entirely different dynamic between the Mossbacher family — Mark’s (Steve Zahn) insecurities run rampant. His wife, Nicole (Connie Britton), prides herself on being a powerful businesswoman.

The White Lotus airs at the same time every Sunday night through mid-August: 9 p.m. EST on HBO and HBO Max.

Mare of Easttown fans might be pleasantly surprised to find that The White Lotus airs at the same time as the HBO miniseries did. The White Lotus airs on HBO at 9 p.m. EST on Sundays throughout July and August. Viewers with the HBO app and the HBO Max app can stream the new series at 9 p.m. For users with only HBO Max, the new episodes become available right at 9 p.m. when the series airs live on HBO.

The White Lotus will air with a total of six episodes, all airing on HBO in that same time frame: 9 p.m. EST. The miniseries premiered on HBO on July 11 and will continue through mid-August. Fans can expect The White Lotus finale to air Sunday, Aug. 15, at 9 p.m. EST. Finally, here is a breakdown of the episode titles and air dates:

Episode 1 — “Arrivals” (July 11)

Episode 2 — “New Day” (July 18)

Episode 3 — “Mysterious Monkeys” (July 25)

Episode 4 — “Recentering” (Aug. 1)

Episode 5 — “The Lotus-Eaters” (Aug. 8)

Episode 6 — “Departures” (Aug. 15)

Fans of the HBO series Succession and Mare of Easttown enjoy this similar new show, The White Lotus. Director Mike White wanted the new limited HBO series to seem similar to Succession, however, at a more relatable level. The wealthy guests at the resort aren’t billionaires like the Roy family, but they are rich people who still benefit from the class they live in. 

The White Lotus also delves into the lives of the resort staff, including manager Armond (Murray Bartlett) and spa manager Belinda (Natasha Rothwell). They try to put on a constant smile, but within the first few episodes, it’s evident that the stress of running the resort is getting to Armond. Lone traveler Tanya McQuoid (Jennifer Coolidge) becomes increasingly interested in keeping Belinda for herself. However, she’s not versed in authentic relationships. Instead, she attempts to throw money at the woman, insisting that Belinda might be better off owning her own business rather than behind the resort desk.

Meanwhile, money and wealth interfere with the newlyweds’ marriage as well. Shane Patton (Jake Lacy) insists that his bride, Rachel (Alexandra Daddario), stop working because her “situation has changed.” She married into a wealthy family, so she should relax. The comments about money don’t sit well with Rachel, who still wants to have a career. 

Plus, there’s an entirely different dynamic between the Mossbacher family — Mark’s (Steve Zahn) insecurities run rampant. His wife, Nicole (Connie Britton), prides herself on being a powerful businesswoman.

The White Lotus airs at the same time every Sunday night through mid-August: 9 p.m. EST on HBO and HBO Max.

The Brilliant, Biting Social Satire of “The White Lotus”

The New Yorker 21 July, 2021 - 05:01pm

Welcome to “Upstairs, Downstairs,” Aloha State edition. The series, called “The White Lotus,” named for the fictional resort where the action takes place, is a near-note-perfect tragicomedy, created by Mike White for HBO. White has written mass-market Hollywood fare like “School of Rock,” but he is better known for his work on small-screen comedies such as “Freaks and Geeks” and, more recently, “Enlightened,” a short-lived cult favorite, also on HBO. Much like the latter series, in which Laura Dern plays an executive who tries to make a comeback after suffering a public nervous breakdown, “The White Lotus” is an examination of what happens when the veneer of conventional sociability dissolves and the power struggles stoked by race, class, and gender erupt from beneath the surface of everyday life.

In the first of six episodes, Armond tells Lani to make each guest feel like the “special chosen baby child of the hotel.” These baby children include the Mossbacher family: Nicole (Connie Britton), a Sheryl Sandberg-like tech C.F.O.; her beta husband, Mark (Steve Zahn); their porn-addicted sixteen-year-old son, Quinn (Fred Hechinger); and their daughter, Olivia (“Euphoria” ’s Sydney Sweeney, once again playing a parent’s nightmare), a bitchy, performatively woke college sophomore, who has brought along a friend, Paula (Brittany O’Grady). There is the obligatory newlywed couple—Shane (Jake Lacy), a real-estate scion in a Cornell baseball cap, and his wife, Rachel (Alexandra Daddario), a clickbait journalist who, hours into her honeymoon, is starting to have second thoughts. There is also Tanya (Jennifer Coolidge), a lonely alcoholic who carries around her dead mother’s ashes in an ornate gilt box. The chief coddlers are Belinda (Natasha Rothwell), a soothing, long-suffering spa manager, who is perhaps the only truly likable character on the show, and Armond, a mustachioed dandy and a recovering addict whose sobriety is tested by his stressful job.

The White Lotus is a breeding ground for conflict, not unlike the Hell masquerading as Heaven in “The Good Place.” Nicole, who complains that her suite doesn’t provide “nice feng-shui” for her “Zoom with China,” feels attacked by her daughter’s mocking of her Hillary-style feminism, and insulted by Rachel, who once wrote a profile of her insinuating that she had capitalized on the #MeToo movement to climb the corporate ladder. (Rachel’s defense: “I was just basically repurposing the profile of you from the Post.”) Shane, who becomes increasingly consumed by his belief that Armond is cheating him out of the top-rate suite his mother paid for, feels that he is being unfairly persecuted for his privilege. “People have been coming for me my whole life,” he says. “I’m just playing the hand I was dealt!” The guests’ awful behavior is a vehicle for satire. “My mother told me I would never be a ballerina, and that was when I was skinny,” Tanya says, while attempting to scatter her mom’s ashes in the ocean. But White has an affection for his characters, who never feel like caricatures. When Tanya murmurs, “Oh, my mother, mother, mother,” we hear the call of a soul in true distress.

White’s greatest sympathy lies with those who have a more tenuous connection to power and money. One example is Belinda, who not only tends to Tanya in the spa but also tucks the grieving woman into bed when she is blackout drunk. Belinda hopes that Tanya will pay for her to open up her own wellness center. Rachel, meanwhile, is adjusting to the idea that being wed to Shane means being rich—a blessing and a curse. When she is offered a reporting assignment during their honeymoon, he tells her, “Whatever they’re paying you, I’ll double it.” Paula, one of the only nonwhite guests at the resort, has a fling with a native-Hawaiian employee, and is perturbed watching him do a traditional dance for the guests. “Obviously, imperialism was bad,” Mark tells her. “But it’s humanity. Welcome to history. Welcome to America.” One thing that White captures, through Paula, is what it’s like to be on vacation with your friend’s family—a tiresome experience of being dragged into tensions that are not your own and still being expected to perform gratitude, which ultimately ends with you despising everyone, including your friend.

“The White Lotus” is largely a character and relationship study, but it does have a plot. The series opens with an ending: Shane, sans Rachel, waits to board a flight back home as a box containing human remains is loaded onto the plane. Someone has died, but who? We are then hurtled, backward in time, to the beginning of the vacation. This makes the show one of many recent HBO series to use nonlinear storytelling (“Sharp Objects,” “I Know This Much Is True,” “Made for Love”). It is also yet another series on the network that seeks to unravel a mysterious death (“Big Little Lies,” “The Undoing,” “Mare of Easttown,” “Sharp Objects” again).

And one would be remiss not to mention “Succession,” given White’s focus on the wealthy ruling class. But, unlike that show, which relies on crowded plots and multiple locations to sketch out the lives of its characters, “The White Lotus” was shot in one place, the Four Seasons in Maui. The focus on a single site—apart from making filming easier during the pandemic—gives the show a Pinteresque airlessness. The guests and the employees crouch and circle one another like animals in a cage. Sometimes the characters have difficulty escaping White’s gaze. At breakfast, Rachel tries to talk to Shane about her career, and he abruptly leaves the table to chase down Armond. In a later scene, of the Mossbacher family fighting at breakfast, we catch a glimpse of Rachel, still alone at the table, staring down at her plate.

White is obsessed with reality television; he has even been a contestant on “The Amazing Race” and “Survivor.” Perhaps this is why “The White Lotus” is the most reality-TV-like scripted series I’ve seen in a long time. The naïvely blissful guests on the boat reminded me of the horny contestants on “Too Hot to Handle” docking at Turks and Caicos, not yet knowing that they’ve agreed to participate in a game of abstinence. The character of Tanya, in Coolidge’s hands, is as heartrending and unbearable as any Bravo housewife. And owing to a slew of rivalries, and a foreboding, tribal-drum-heavy score, composed by Cristobal Tapia de Veer, White’s show also has ample tinges of “Survivor.” After duking it out for a week on an island, who will come out alive?

“Is this like a kamikaze situation? Are you gonna take me down with you?” Dillon (Lukas Gage), an employee, asks Armond, who—spoilers ahead—has broken his sobriety and is in full fuck-it-mask-off mode. “What do you care?” his boss answers. “You make shit money. They exploit me, I exploit you.” (The actors are excellent across the board, but Bartlett, whose practiced amiability turns progressively feral throughout the series, is a revelation.) Later on, Armond, in a drugged haze, enters Shane’s room, drops his trousers, and squats, straining out a memento in his rival’s suitcase.

Watching this hilarious, horrifying moment, I thought of Jamaica Kincaid’s “A Small Place,” in which she derides the tourists who come to her native Antigua in search of a scenic vacation. “You must not wonder what exactly happened to the contents of your lavatory when you flushed it,” Kincaid writes. “The contents of your lavatory might, just might, graze gently against your ankle as you wade carefree in the water, for you see, in Antigua, there is no proper sewage-disposal system.” Staying at the White Lotus might seem like the most wonderful thing in the world, but don’t be surprised if, by the end of the vacation, you end up with shit in your luggage. You’ve more than likely done something to deserve it. ♦

The Brilliant, Biting Social Satire of “The White Lotus”

JoBlo Streaming & TV Trailers 21 July, 2021 - 05:01pm

Welcome to “Upstairs, Downstairs,” Aloha State edition. The series, called “The White Lotus,” named for the fictional resort where the action takes place, is a near-note-perfect tragicomedy, created by Mike White for HBO. White has written mass-market Hollywood fare like “School of Rock,” but he is better known for his work on small-screen comedies such as “Freaks and Geeks” and, more recently, “Enlightened,” a short-lived cult favorite, also on HBO. Much like the latter series, in which Laura Dern plays an executive who tries to make a comeback after suffering a public nervous breakdown, “The White Lotus” is an examination of what happens when the veneer of conventional sociability dissolves and the power struggles stoked by race, class, and gender erupt from beneath the surface of everyday life.

In the first of six episodes, Armond tells Lani to make each guest feel like the “special chosen baby child of the hotel.” These baby children include the Mossbacher family: Nicole (Connie Britton), a Sheryl Sandberg-like tech C.F.O.; her beta husband, Mark (Steve Zahn); their porn-addicted sixteen-year-old son, Quinn (Fred Hechinger); and their daughter, Olivia (“Euphoria” ’s Sydney Sweeney, once again playing a parent’s nightmare), a bitchy, performatively woke college sophomore, who has brought along a friend, Paula (Brittany O’Grady). There is the obligatory newlywed couple—Shane (Jake Lacy), a real-estate scion in a Cornell baseball cap, and his wife, Rachel (Alexandra Daddario), a clickbait journalist who, hours into her honeymoon, is starting to have second thoughts. There is also Tanya (Jennifer Coolidge), a lonely alcoholic who carries around her dead mother’s ashes in an ornate gilt box. The chief coddlers are Belinda (Natasha Rothwell), a soothing, long-suffering spa manager, who is perhaps the only truly likable character on the show, and Armond, a mustachioed dandy and a recovering addict whose sobriety is tested by his stressful job.

The White Lotus is a breeding ground for conflict, not unlike the Hell masquerading as Heaven in “The Good Place.” Nicole, who complains that her suite doesn’t provide “nice feng-shui” for her “Zoom with China,” feels attacked by her daughter’s mocking of her Hillary-style feminism, and insulted by Rachel, who once wrote a profile of her insinuating that she had capitalized on the #MeToo movement to climb the corporate ladder. (Rachel’s defense: “I was just basically repurposing the profile of you from the Post.”) Shane, who becomes increasingly consumed by his belief that Armond is cheating him out of the top-rate suite his mother paid for, feels that he is being unfairly persecuted for his privilege. “People have been coming for me my whole life,” he says. “I’m just playing the hand I was dealt!” The guests’ awful behavior is a vehicle for satire. “My mother told me I would never be a ballerina, and that was when I was skinny,” Tanya says, while attempting to scatter her mom’s ashes in the ocean. But White has an affection for his characters, who never feel like caricatures. When Tanya murmurs, “Oh, my mother, mother, mother,” we hear the call of a soul in true distress.

White’s greatest sympathy lies with those who have a more tenuous connection to power and money. One example is Belinda, who not only tends to Tanya in the spa but also tucks the grieving woman into bed when she is blackout drunk. Belinda hopes that Tanya will pay for her to open up her own wellness center. Rachel, meanwhile, is adjusting to the idea that being wed to Shane means being rich—a blessing and a curse. When she is offered a reporting assignment during their honeymoon, he tells her, “Whatever they’re paying you, I’ll double it.” Paula, one of the only nonwhite guests at the resort, has a fling with a native-Hawaiian employee, and is perturbed watching him do a traditional dance for the guests. “Obviously, imperialism was bad,” Mark tells her. “But it’s humanity. Welcome to history. Welcome to America.” One thing that White captures, through Paula, is what it’s like to be on vacation with your friend’s family—a tiresome experience of being dragged into tensions that are not your own and still being expected to perform gratitude, which ultimately ends with you despising everyone, including your friend.

“The White Lotus” is largely a character and relationship study, but it does have a plot. The series opens with an ending: Shane, sans Rachel, waits to board a flight back home as a box containing human remains is loaded onto the plane. Someone has died, but who? We are then hurtled, backward in time, to the beginning of the vacation. This makes the show one of many recent HBO series to use nonlinear storytelling (“Sharp Objects,” “I Know This Much Is True,” “Made for Love”). It is also yet another series on the network that seeks to unravel a mysterious death (“Big Little Lies,” “The Undoing,” “Mare of Easttown,” “Sharp Objects” again).

And one would be remiss not to mention “Succession,” given White’s focus on the wealthy ruling class. But, unlike that show, which relies on crowded plots and multiple locations to sketch out the lives of its characters, “The White Lotus” was shot in one place, the Four Seasons in Maui. The focus on a single site—apart from making filming easier during the pandemic—gives the show a Pinteresque airlessness. The guests and the employees crouch and circle one another like animals in a cage. Sometimes the characters have difficulty escaping White’s gaze. At breakfast, Rachel tries to talk to Shane about her career, and he abruptly leaves the table to chase down Armond. In a later scene, of the Mossbacher family fighting at breakfast, we catch a glimpse of Rachel, still alone at the table, staring down at her plate.

White is obsessed with reality television; he has even been a contestant on “The Amazing Race” and “Survivor.” Perhaps this is why “The White Lotus” is the most reality-TV-like scripted series I’ve seen in a long time. The naïvely blissful guests on the boat reminded me of the horny contestants on “Too Hot to Handle” docking at Turks and Caicos, not yet knowing that they’ve agreed to participate in a game of abstinence. The character of Tanya, in Coolidge’s hands, is as heartrending and unbearable as any Bravo housewife. And owing to a slew of rivalries, and a foreboding, tribal-drum-heavy score, composed by Cristobal Tapia de Veer, White’s show also has ample tinges of “Survivor.” After duking it out for a week on an island, who will come out alive?

“Is this like a kamikaze situation? Are you gonna take me down with you?” Dillon (Lukas Gage), an employee, asks Armond, who—spoilers ahead—has broken his sobriety and is in full fuck-it-mask-off mode. “What do you care?” his boss answers. “You make shit money. They exploit me, I exploit you.” (The actors are excellent across the board, but Bartlett, whose practiced amiability turns progressively feral throughout the series, is a revelation.) Later on, Armond, in a drugged haze, enters Shane’s room, drops his trousers, and squats, straining out a memento in his rival’s suitcase.

Watching this hilarious, horrifying moment, I thought of Jamaica Kincaid’s “A Small Place,” in which she derides the tourists who come to her native Antigua in search of a scenic vacation. “You must not wonder what exactly happened to the contents of your lavatory when you flushed it,” Kincaid writes. “The contents of your lavatory might, just might, graze gently against your ankle as you wade carefree in the water, for you see, in Antigua, there is no proper sewage-disposal system.” Staying at the White Lotus might seem like the most wonderful thing in the world, but don’t be surprised if, by the end of the vacation, you end up with shit in your luggage. You’ve more than likely done something to deserve it. ♦

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