Jennifer Aniston's Haircare Line Named After Used Car

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Gawker 08 September, 2021 - 01:13pm 6 views

What is lolavie?

LolaVie's debut product is a spray that claims to detangle locks, increase shine and protect hair from damage. Priced at $25, it comes in a sleek white bottle and contains exfoliating botanicals. CNNJennifer Aniston unveils new hair care brand, LolaVie

Stevie Nicks opened up about Lindsey Buckingham’s dismissal from Fleetwood Mac, calling her former bandmate’s version of events “factually inaccurate” and “revisionist history.”

Buckingham, who joined the band with musical partner Nicks ahead of their self-titled 1975 LP, has maintained that his firing extended from Nicks no longer wanting to be in a band with him.

That intensified strain, he’s said in earlier interviews, related to a few specific issues: his desire to briefly delay a Fleetwood Mac tour, allowing him to play behind a planned solo album; his complaint about the song choice, the Nicks-written “Rhiannon,” used when the group walked onstage to receive the 2018 MusiCares Person of the Year award; and Nicks’ perception that Buckingham mocked her lengthy speech at the ceremony. (The guitarist previously told Rolling Stone he was fired soon after the event, receiving a call from band manager Irving Azoff.)

“Ironically, nothing went down that night that was [as contentious] as the stuff we’d been through for 43 years,” Buckingham told Los Angeles Times in an expansive profile. He said he believes Nicks wanted to “cut herself loose” from having to perform alongside him in concert. “I think she saw the possibility of remaking the band more in the Stevie Nicks vein. More mellow and kind of down, giving her more chances to do the kind of talking she does onstage.”

But Nicks has a different explanation.

“His version of events is factually inaccurate, and while I’ve never spoken publicly on the matter, certainly it feels the time has come to shine a light on the truth,” Nicks told the Los Angeles Times through her publicist. “To be exceedingly clear, I did not have him fired, I did not ask for him to be fired, I did not demand he be fired. Frankly, I fired myself. I proactively removed myself from the band and a situation I considered to be toxic to my well-being. I was done. If the band went on without me, so be it.

“And after many lengthy group discussions, Fleetwood Mac, a band whose legacy is rooted in evolution and change, found a new path forward with two hugely talented new members [Neil Finn and Mike Campbell].”

Buckingham told Rolling Stone that he “didn’t see” the current iteration of Fleetwood Mac onstage. “I’m sure it was fine,” he said. “Although just looking at the set list, the whole thing seemed somewhat generic and perhaps bordering on being a cover band. We’ve all had our ups and down, but we always put the band’s legacy first. But what this did was dishonor the legacy that we built.”

Nicks also issued a similar statement to Rolling Stone, and in one section highlighted “an exceedingly difficult time with Lindsey at MusiCares in New York,” saying she decided after the event that she “was no longer willing to work with him.”

"I could publicly reflect on the many reasons why, and perhaps I will do that someday in a memoir," she added, “but suffice it to say we could start in 1968 and work up to 2018 with a litany of very precise reasons why I will not work with him.”

Elsewhere in the Los Angeles Times profile, Buckingham commented on his 2019 heart attack and subsequent triple bypass surgery, recuperating from his health issues and his upcoming self-titled solo LP.

Read full article at Gawker

Stevie Nicks Comments On Lindsey Buckingham's Firing From Fleetwood Mac For The First Time

LaineyGossip 09 September, 2021 - 01:00pm

Buckingham has not been quiet about that ordeal. Soon after his dismissal, he told an audience, “I think what you would say is that there were factions within the band that had lost their perspective,” and he later said Stevie Nicks had manager Irving Azoff fire him over the phone. Speaking to Stereogum that year, he called Mick Fleetwood “weak-willed” and summed up his attitude toward his former bandmates: “I just have to forgive them because it’s really just Stevie being so needy for a certain kind of attention and maybe not wanting to compete with the vitality that I have.”

In a pair of new interviews this week, he finds incendiary new ways to communicate the same concept. Speaking to Rolling Stone, Buckingham says he was fired because he asked Fleetwood Mac to delay an upcoming tour so he could release this new solo album and take it on the road. He thought they were still in negotiations about it when he received word from Azoff that he was out. He continues to blame Nicks, who “wanted to shape the band in her own image, a more mellow thing.” Buckingham says the other members of Fleetwood Mac could have stepped in to keep him in the band, but they cower before Nicks: “I think others in the band just felt that they were not empowered enough, individually, for whatever their own reasons, to stand up for what was right. And so, it became a little bit like Trump and the Republicans.”

Buckingham also speculates that Nicks refused to make a new Fleetwood Mac album after the classic lineup’s ultra-successful 2015 tour because she didn’t have any new songs to offer. And he wonders aloud whether Nicks, who was dating Buckingham when they joined Fleetwood Mac together in 1975, struggled with his ability to start a family in his 40s and 50s while she remained childless. (Nicks told Rolling Stone in 2015, “Lindsey and I would always laughingly say — which we both knew was never going to happen — that, like, when we were 90, and everybody else was dead, maybe we would end up together in an old folks’ home… So when his first child was coming, I think we were walking in an airport, and I said, ‘Well, I guess we’re never going to get to that old folks’ home.’ And he’s like, ‘Yeah, I guess we never are.'”)

Buckingham shared similar thoughts with the LA Times: “You could do a whole analysis on Stevie at this point in her life and what she’s allowed to happen and what she’s allowed to slip away from her. Her creativity, at least for a while it seemed like she wasn’t in touch with that. Same with the level of energy she once had onstage. I think that was hard for her, seeing me jump around in an age-inappropriate way. Also, she’s lonely. She’s alone. She has the people who work for her, and I’m sure she has friends, but you know.”

In response, Nicks shared this statement to Rolling Stone:

It’s unfortunate that Lindsey has chosen to tell a revisionist history of what transpired in 2018 with Fleetwood Mac. His version of events is factually inaccurate, and while I’ve never spoken publicly on the matter, preferring to not air dirty laundry, certainly it feels the time has come to shine a light on the truth. Following an exceedingly difficult time with Lindsey at MusiCares in New York, in 2018, I decided for myself that I was no longer willing to work with him. I could publicly reflect on the many reasons why, and perhaps I will do that someday in a memoir, but suffice it to say we could start in 1968 and work up to 2018 with a litany of very precise reasons why I will not work with him. To be exceedingly clear, I did not have him fired, I did not ask for him to be fired, I did not demand he be fired. Frankly, I fired myself. I proactively removed myself from the band and a situation I considered to be toxic to my well-being. I was done. If the band went on without me, so be it. I have championed independence my whole life, and I believe every human being should have the absolute freedom to set their boundaries of what they can and cannot work with. And after many lengthy group discussions, Fleetwood Mac, a band whose legacy is rooted in evolution and change, found a new path forward with two hugely talented new members.

Further to that, as for a comment on “family” — I was thrilled for Lindsey when he had children, but I wasn’t interested in making those same life choices. Those are my decisions that I get to make for myself. I’m proud of the life choices I’ve made, and it seems a shame for him to pass judgment on anyone who makes a choice to live their life on their own terms, even if it looks differently from what his life choices have been.

Earlier this year Mick Fleetwood seemed optimistic about the prospect of getting Buckingham back in the band. In light of all this, it feels… unlikely.

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Jennifer Aniston launches haircare range, 25 years after 'The Rachel' rocked the world

Yahoo News 09 September, 2021 - 05:06am

We're all fully expecting to have hair like her famous Friends character, Rachel Green.

LolaVie, (reportedly named after the star's own nickname, 'Lola'), uses only plant-based, naturally-derived ingredients and is all about merging science and nature, creating products that give you Jen-worthy hair but go easy on the environment. 

A post shared on LolaVie's official Instagram account reads: "Today, LolaVie officially launches – a little idea from @jenniferaniston that evolved into a line made to help your hair feel healthy and look effortless."

Offering more info on the new range, the post continues: "Our products are made with plant-based, naturally-derived ingredients — and without parabens, silicones, sulfates, phthalates, and gluten… And of course we are cruelty-free."

Less than a week after teasing the launch of the brand on Instagram, the actor-slash-beauty entrepreneur has already released her debut product: a glossing detangler ($25), which claims to detangle locks, increase shine and protect hair from damage.

Read more: Jennifer Aniston shares face covering selfie urging fans to ‘wear a damn mask’ amid coronavirus pandemic

Aniston's rise to hair fame came after her Friends character's shaggy 'pob' made 'The Rachel' one of the requested haircuts of all time, sparking a global trend in styling. 

But though thousands of us saw the popular choppy bob as the ultimate in hair inspo, the actor herself wasn't so keen. 

"How do I say this? I think it was the ugliest haircut I've ever seen," she confided in an interview with Allure

"I love Chris [McMillan, the hairstylist who created the cut]," she noted, but "he's the bane of my existence at the same time because he started that damn Rachel, which was not my best look." 

The problem, she said, was that she had no idea how to style it. "It only lasted for about six months because it just was hard to do. I loved it, but I couldn’t style it on my own."

Although the 52-year-old has long-since moved on from the famous style she modelled in the 90s sitcom, her hair remains her most-discussed feature. 

Read more: The £17 moisturiser Jennifer Aniston has used since her teens

Slipping seamlessly from short and choppy to long and beautifully layered, from soft beachy waves, to sun-kissed golden highlights and face-framing layers, Aniston is still providing hair-spo all over the world. 

Her colourist, (still Chris McMillan) believes it's partly the glossiness and silkiness of her locks that makes her mane so covetable. 

"She loves having her hair shampooed fresh and clean. She shampoos and conditions pretty much every day—if she's going for the day-old-hair look, she prefers to create it using products," McMillan told ELLE.

As well as keeping her hair squeaky clean, the actor is also rumoured to be a longtime fan of horse hair brand Mane 'N Tail for upping the sheen on her locks. 

As the name suggests it was originally created to help keep show ponies’ manes and tails looking strong and shiny, but its popularity quickly grew when their owners realised it worked wonders for their own hair too.

Despite being seen as the ultimate hair icon, The Morning Show actor says she still suffers from bad hair days. 

“Honestly, my hair has always been a thorn in my side,” she told Forbes. “I've always had that issue of not having good hair days. I mean, I have tried everything from egg and mayonnaise in my hair to avocado. You name it, I've tried it. 

"It just felt very natural for this to be my extracurricular activity.”

By "this" she is referring to the new LolaVie brand, which Aniston says she has been working on for the past five years.

Although there are other hair products in the works, the star wanted to release the detangling spray first because she believes it is the "Swiss army knife" of formulas – and it's something that fills a gap in her own daily line-up.

"I love a really good detangler because my hair has gone through so much thrashing," she told Allure, explaining that the LolaVie version is meant to replace multiple other steps in the haircare routine.

"[My hair routine is] basically washing and conditioning it, putting the detangler on, brushing it through, putting it up in a towel for ten minutes, and then I either blow it out or let it dry naturally," she continues. 

Read more: Jane Fonda, 83, reveals why she’s happy she embraced her natural grey hair

The hardest part of the entire process of designing the products, according to Aniston, was making sure they worked across a range of hair types. 

“The hardest part was having it work for everybody—everybody's different and has a different routine,” she told Forbes. “ When we got a new batch of samples, with different ingredients and different combinations of things, we handed [them] out to a group of friends who each have different heads of hair and got the report back from them. It was really interesting. It was a little bit of a puzzle. But I think we got to a place where it's pretty universal.”

Unfortunately, we're not yet sure when LolaVie will be available to shop in the UK but watch this space –because it's sure to be a sell out. 

All about Jennifer Aniston's new haircare brand from the star herself: "I've been working on this for quite a long time"

Natalia Bryant is Teen Vogue's September cover star. She discussed her father, Kobe Bryant, and sister, Gianna, who died in a helicopter crash.

Rihanna has decided to drop the legal case she pursued against her father Ronald Fenty in 2019 for false advertising and invasion of privacy.

Macron wore a black minidress with navy blue pumps.

A flattering frock for every body type, and it has pockets!

New York Fashion Week is back in action.

Lofty, maybe even gargantuan, expectations don’t faze Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The reigning Super Bowl champions open the 2021 NFL season against the Dallas Cowboys on Thursday night, confident they have everything it takes — at least on paper — to become the first team to win back-to-back titles since Brady led the 2003 and 2004 New England Patriots to consecutive crowns. No one knows what it’s like to have a target on your back every week more than Brady, a seven-time Super Bowl winner who turned 44 during training camp — a few days after reminding teammates the first order of business is leaving last season behind.

The must-have sweater of the season that your boyfriend might just steal from you.

Vaccine developer Novavax Inc said on Wednesday it has initiated an early-stage study to test its combined flu and COVID-19 vaccine. Participants will receive a combination of the company's COVID-19 vaccine candidate, NVX-CoV2373, and its Influenza shot NanoFlu along with an adjuvant or vaccine booster. "Combination of these two vaccines...may lead to greater efficiencies for the healthcare system and achieve high levels of protection against COVID-19 and influenza with a single regimen," Gregory Glenn, President of Research and Development at Novavax, said in a statement.

The teen lost her father and sister in a 2020 helicopter crash.

Gain extra storage, no nails required.

Reese Witherspoon is honoring her daughter, Ava Phillippe, on her 22nd birthday with the cutest throwback photo of her oldest child. We did a double-take when we saw it because we were almost convinced it was The Morning Show star and not Phillippe in the photo — that’s how much they look alike. The black-and-white […]

Minnesota attorney says he won’t pursue cases in aim to reduce ‘unnecessary’ encounters between police and people of color that can turn fatal The grave of Philando Castile at Calvary cemetery in St Louis. Castile was shot and killed by a police officer in a 2016 stop for a broken tail light in Minnesota. Photograph: David Carson/AP A Minnesota prosecutor who filed manslaughter charges against a police officer who shot and killed the black motorist Philando Castile in a 2016 stop for a broken ta

If Gable Steveson does compete in mixed martial arts, it'll have to wait after he accomplished a "childhood dream" by signing with WWE.

Here's What Jennifer Aniston Really Thinks About Her Famous "Rachel Haircut"

Bustle 08 September, 2021 - 03:58pm

Plus, the scoop on LolaVie, the actor’s debut beauty brand.

Aniston (and her hair) have been making a splash since the 1990s — but she’s never quite gotten the hype. While the “Rachel Haircut” that became her signature look on “Friends” had an undeniable impact on pop culture and massive influence on the era’s beauty trends, she tells Bustle that her hair has always been a “thorn” in her side. “It’s curly if I’m in humidity, with ringlets and frizz. Then, it’s different if I’m in dry weather,” she says. “It’s got five different personalities, so it’s really unpredictable. I’ve tried everything — from raw eggs, mayonnaise, and avocado to hair masks — to bring it back to life after I’ve beaten the crap out of it.”

Her reaction to her early aughts hairstyle becoming one of the most requested cuts of all time? “I giggle to myself. Oh my God, if you only knew,” she laughs. Though Aniston’s locks are often upheld as the epitome of effortlessness, she would like to remind you that that couldn’t be further from the case. “You can say it over the years, like, ‘Guys, this is not easy.’ Nothing falls off a tree looking like this. But it’s getting easier. [My hair and I] are making peace with each other.”

If the brand’s name sounds familiar, you might be recalling a fragrance that Aniston released back in 2010 under the same name. The origin is Lola, a nickname she lovingly earned in the 1990s when she moved to Los Angeles from New York. “I got my first used car and was very excited,” she says. “Afterward, someone said to me, ‘What are you going to name your car?’ I said, ‘Wait a minute. Is that something that you do in California?’ They said, ‘Yeah, duh...’

Aniston decided to call her new car the first name that came to her mind: Lola. “I just went with Lola. Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets,” she says. “I loved the song.” After that, the nickname stuck. “If I went over to a friend's house, they would always say, ‘Lola’s here!’” she adds. When it came to the line, Aniston says the name felt like like an apropos choice that’s synonymous with confidence, fearlessness, and empowerment.

With the beauty market becoming increasingly more saturated, Aniston is launching LolaVie with just one product — a multi-use “Swiss Army Knife in a product,” as Aniston calls the Glossing Detangler. Realizing how cluttered the shelves have become (“I personally get overwhelmed when a brand has a ton of products,” she says), the idea is for each item to address a specific gap in the market.

“A really nice detangler is really important for me because of all of the damage that’s been done to [my hair] over the years,” she says of the debut product. “The goal was to create a detangler that doesn’t just allow for easy access to comb through, but that also provides heat protection, vitamins and minerals, and a shine that doesn’t weigh it down. That was the first big mission.”

The formulation process was tricky. “It took trial and error and different samples and batches of ingredients. I would give it to my wonderful group of lab rat girlfriends with different types of hair and have them try it,” Aniston says. The lightweight spray can be used alone or incorporated into your current routine. “One of the hardest things was trying to get something that works for every single hair type. It’s just literally impossible, but I think we got as close as we could — and it was sure fun in the process.”

Here's What Jennifer Aniston Really Thinks About Her Famous "Rachel Haircut"

Yahoo Entertainment 08 September, 2021 - 03:58pm

Plus, the scoop on LolaVie, the actor’s debut beauty brand.

Aniston (and her hair) have been making a splash since the 1990s — but she’s never quite gotten the hype. While the “Rachel Haircut” that became her signature look on “Friends” had an undeniable impact on pop culture and massive influence on the era’s beauty trends, she tells Bustle that her hair has always been a “thorn” in her side. “It’s curly if I’m in humidity, with ringlets and frizz. Then, it’s different if I’m in dry weather,” she says. “It’s got five different personalities, so it’s really unpredictable. I’ve tried everything — from raw eggs, mayonnaise, and avocado to hair masks — to bring it back to life after I’ve beaten the crap out of it.”

Her reaction to her early aughts hairstyle becoming one of the most requested cuts of all time? “I giggle to myself. Oh my God, if you only knew,” she laughs. Though Aniston’s locks are often upheld as the epitome of effortlessness, she would like to remind you that that couldn’t be further from the case. “You can say it over the years, like, ‘Guys, this is not easy.’ Nothing falls off a tree looking like this. But it’s getting easier. [My hair and I] are making peace with each other.”

If the brand’s name sounds familiar, you might be recalling a fragrance that Aniston released back in 2010 under the same name. The origin is Lola, a nickname she lovingly earned in the 1990s when she moved to Los Angeles from New York. “I got my first used car and was very excited,” she says. “Afterward, someone said to me, ‘What are you going to name your car?’ I said, ‘Wait a minute. Is that something that you do in California?’ They said, ‘Yeah, duh...’

Aniston decided to call her new car the first name that came to her mind: Lola. “I just went with Lola. Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets,” she says. “I loved the song.” After that, the nickname stuck. “If I went over to a friend's house, they would always say, ‘Lola’s here!’” she adds. When it came to the line, Aniston says the name felt like like an apropos choice that’s synonymous with confidence, fearlessness, and empowerment.

With the beauty market becoming increasingly more saturated, Aniston is launching LolaVie with just one product — a multi-use “Swiss Army Knife in a product,” as Aniston calls the Glossing Detangler. Realizing how cluttered the shelves have become (“I personally get overwhelmed when a brand has a ton of products,” she says), the idea is for each item to address a specific gap in the market.

“A really nice detangler is really important for me because of all of the damage that’s been done to [my hair] over the years,” she says of the debut product. “The goal was to create a detangler that doesn’t just allow for easy access to comb through, but that also provides heat protection, vitamins and minerals, and a shine that doesn’t weigh it down. That was the first big mission.”

The formulation process was tricky. “It took trial and error and different samples and batches of ingredients. I would give it to my wonderful group of lab rat girlfriends with different types of hair and have them try it,” Aniston says. The lightweight spray can be used alone or incorporated into your current routine. “One of the hardest things was trying to get something that works for every single hair type. It’s just literally impossible, but I think we got as close as we could — and it was sure fun in the process.”

Here's What Jennifer Aniston Really Thinks About Her Famous "Rachel Haircut"

Yahoo Lifestyle 08 September, 2021 - 03:58pm

Plus, the scoop on LolaVie, the actor’s debut beauty brand.

Aniston (and her hair) have been making a splash since the 1990s — but she’s never quite gotten the hype. While the “Rachel Haircut” that became her signature look on “Friends” had an undeniable impact on pop culture and massive influence on the era’s beauty trends, she tells Bustle that her hair has always been a “thorn” in her side. “It’s curly if I’m in humidity, with ringlets and frizz. Then, it’s different if I’m in dry weather,” she says. “It’s got five different personalities, so it’s really unpredictable. I’ve tried everything — from raw eggs, mayonnaise, and avocado to hair masks — to bring it back to life after I’ve beaten the crap out of it.”

Her reaction to her early aughts hairstyle becoming one of the most requested cuts of all time? “I giggle to myself. Oh my God, if you only knew,” she laughs. Though Aniston’s locks are often upheld as the epitome of effortlessness, she would like to remind you that that couldn’t be further from the case. “You can say it over the years, like, ‘Guys, this is not easy.’ Nothing falls off a tree looking like this. But it’s getting easier. [My hair and I] are making peace with each other.”

If the brand’s name sounds familiar, you might be recalling a fragrance that Aniston released back in 2010 under the same name. The origin is Lola, a nickname she lovingly earned in the 1990s when she moved to Los Angeles from New York. “I got my first used car and was very excited,” she says. “Afterward, someone said to me, ‘What are you going to name your car?’ I said, ‘Wait a minute. Is that something that you do in California?’ They said, ‘Yeah, duh...’

Aniston decided to call her new car the first name that came to her mind: Lola. “I just went with Lola. Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets,” she says. “I loved the song.” After that, the nickname stuck. “If I went over to a friend's house, they would always say, ‘Lola’s here!’” she adds. When it came to the line, Aniston says the name felt like like an apropos choice that’s synonymous with confidence, fearlessness, and empowerment.

With the beauty market becoming increasingly more saturated, Aniston is launching LolaVie with just one product — a multi-use “Swiss Army Knife in a product,” as Aniston calls the Glossing Detangler. Realizing how cluttered the shelves have become (“I personally get overwhelmed when a brand has a ton of products,” she says), the idea is for each item to address a specific gap in the market.

“A really nice detangler is really important for me because of all of the damage that’s been done to [my hair] over the years,” she says of the debut product. “The goal was to create a detangler that doesn’t just allow for easy access to comb through, but that also provides heat protection, vitamins and minerals, and a shine that doesn’t weigh it down. That was the first big mission.”

The formulation process was tricky. “It took trial and error and different samples and batches of ingredients. I would give it to my wonderful group of lab rat girlfriends with different types of hair and have them try it,” Aniston says. The lightweight spray can be used alone or incorporated into your current routine. “One of the hardest things was trying to get something that works for every single hair type. It’s just literally impossible, but I think we got as close as we could — and it was sure fun in the process.”

Here's What Jennifer Aniston Really Thinks About Her Famous "Rachel Haircut"

msnNOW 08 September, 2021 - 03:58pm

Plus, the scoop on LolaVie, the actor’s debut beauty brand.

Aniston (and her hair) have been making a splash since the 1990s — but she’s never quite gotten the hype. While the “Rachel Haircut” that became her signature look on “Friends” had an undeniable impact on pop culture and massive influence on the era’s beauty trends, she tells Bustle that her hair has always been a “thorn” in her side. “It’s curly if I’m in humidity, with ringlets and frizz. Then, it’s different if I’m in dry weather,” she says. “It’s got five different personalities, so it’s really unpredictable. I’ve tried everything — from raw eggs, mayonnaise, and avocado to hair masks — to bring it back to life after I’ve beaten the crap out of it.”

Her reaction to her early aughts hairstyle becoming one of the most requested cuts of all time? “I giggle to myself. Oh my God, if you only knew,” she laughs. Though Aniston’s locks are often upheld as the epitome of effortlessness, she would like to remind you that that couldn’t be further from the case. “You can say it over the years, like, ‘Guys, this is not easy.’ Nothing falls off a tree looking like this. But it’s getting easier. [My hair and I] are making peace with each other.”

If the brand’s name sounds familiar, you might be recalling a fragrance that Aniston released back in 2010 under the same name. The origin is Lola, a nickname she lovingly earned in the 1990s when she moved to Los Angeles from New York. “I got my first used car and was very excited,” she says. “Afterward, someone said to me, ‘What are you going to name your car?’ I said, ‘Wait a minute. Is that something that you do in California?’ They said, ‘Yeah, duh...’

Aniston decided to call her new car the first name that came to her mind: Lola. “I just went with Lola. Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets,” she says. “I loved the song.” After that, the nickname stuck. “If I went over to a friend's house, they would always say, ‘Lola’s here!’” she adds. When it came to the line, Aniston says the name felt like like an apropos choice that’s synonymous with confidence, fearlessness, and empowerment.

With the beauty market becoming increasingly more saturated, Aniston is launching LolaVie with just one product — a multi-use “Swiss Army Knife in a product,” as Aniston calls the Glossing Detangler. Realizing how cluttered the shelves have become (“I personally get overwhelmed when a brand has a ton of products,” she says), the idea is for each item to address a specific gap in the market.

“A really nice detangler is really important for me because of all of the damage that’s been done to [my hair] over the years,” she says of the debut product. “The goal was to create a detangler that doesn’t just allow for easy access to comb through, but that also provides heat protection, vitamins and minerals, and a shine that doesn’t weigh it down. That was the first big mission.”

The formulation process was tricky. “It took trial and error and different samples and batches of ingredients. I would give it to my wonderful group of lab rat girlfriends with different types of hair and have them try it,” Aniston says. The lightweight spray can be used alone or incorporated into your current routine. “One of the hardest things was trying to get something that works for every single hair type. It’s just literally impossible, but I think we got as close as we could — and it was sure fun in the process.”

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