Jury orders Walmart to pay $125 million after it fired worker with Down syndrome

Business

CBS News 19 July, 2021 - 10:19am 25 views

Marlo Spaeth worked for Walmart for about 16 years before she was fired from its Manitowoc store in 2015 due to excessive absenteeism. According to the lawsuit, brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Spaeth's work schedule changed after Walmart implemented a new computerized system in 2014, which created significant difficulty for her.

Spaeth's condition requires that she maintain a rigid schedule of daily activities, the lawsuit said. Spaeth requested that she be allowed to resume her prior work schedule of noon to 4 p.m, because if she did not eat dinner at the same time every night, she would get sick, the lawsuit said. Instead of returning her to the old schedule, Walmart fired her, Spaeth alleged. Walmart also refused to rehire her when Spaeth requested it, the lawsuit said.

"Ms. Spaeth's request was a simple one and denying it profoundly altered her life," Julianne Bowman, Chicago District Director for the EEOC, said in a statement.

The jury in federal court in Green Bay awarded Marlo Spaeth more than $125 million in punitive damages on Thursday. The jury also awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages, the EEOC said Friday in announcing the ruling.

"The substantial jury verdict in this case sends a strong message to employers that disability discrimination is unacceptable in our nation's workplaces," EEOC Chair Charlotte Burrows said in a statement.

Walmart is likely to pay much less than the substantial verdict the jury awarded. A company spokesman told the Associated Press Friday the damages will be reduced to the maximum allowed, which is $300,000.

Spokesman Randy Hargrove said the retail giant was reviewing its legal options, and said that Walmart does not tolerate discrimination of any kind and routinely accommodates thousands of employees every year.

"We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers' expectations and while Ms. Spaeth's schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available," Hargrove said. "We're sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth, however the EEOC's demands were unreasonable."

The jury found that Walmart failed to accommodate Spaeth's disability and fired her because of it, which is a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the EEOC said.

Copyright © 2021 CBS Interactive Inc. All rights reserved.

Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes.

Market data provided by ICE Data Services. ICE Limitations. Powered and implemented by FactSet. News provided by The Associated Press. Legal Statement.

Read full article at CBS News

Walmart told to pay woman with Down’s syndrome $125m for unfair dismissal

The Guardian 19 July, 2021 - 10:11am

Marlo Spaeth, who began working as a sales associate in 1999, was fired by the retail giant in 2015 for what they said was excessive absenteeism after she repeatedly asked Walmart to return her to normal work hours.

Spaeth, who consistently received positive performance reviews, originally worked from noon to 4pm. But after Walmart implemented a computerized scheduling system in November 2014, she was required to work from 1pm to 5.30pm.

The new schedule caused Spaeth difficulty owing to her disability and she struggled to keep up with the new routine. Because of Spaeth’s need for a rigid schedule, her lawsuit said, if she did not have dinner at the same time every evening, she would get sick.

According to her lawyers, Spaeth asked for her start and end times to be adjusted back to her original schedule. Despite her pleas, Walmart fired her in July 2015 for excessive absenteeism.

Though Spaeth’s termination letter said she could be rehired, Walmart refused to do so when she requested it. The jury found that Walmart turned down the request “because of her disability or because of their need to accommodate her disability”, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

“The jury here recognized, and apparently was quite offended, that Ms Spaeth lost her job because of needless – and unlawful – inflexibility on the part of Walmart,” said Gregory Gochanour, the EEOC’s Chicago regional attorney.

In addition to the $125m in punitive damages, the jury awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages for emotional pain and mental anguish. Walmart said the verdict would be reduced to $300,000, which under federal law is the statutory maximum for punitive and compensatory damages.

Walmart spokesperson Randy Hargrove said the company was reviewing its legal options, as “the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable”.

“We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year,” Hargrove said.

“We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available.”

Jury rules against Walmart in discrimination case, awards woman $125M

Fox Business 19 July, 2021 - 09:39am

Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital SolutionsLegal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - New Privacy Policy

FOX Business’ Lydia Hu on the latest retail headlines. 

A former Walmart employee with Down syndrome has been awarded more than $125 million in punitive damages after a Wisconsin jury ruled that the retail giant violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when they fired her in 2015. 

Marlo Spaeth, who also was awarded $150,000 in compensatory damages by the jury in federal court in Green Bay, had alleged that schedule changes exacerbated attendance problems that led to her firing.

"The substantial jury verdict in this case sends a strong message to employers that disability discrimination is unacceptable in our nation’s workplaces," Charlotte Burrows, the chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which brought the lawsuit against Walmart, said in a statement

WALMART’S NEW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PREDICTS GROCERY SUBSTITUTES FOR SHOPPERS 

"Employers, no matter how large, have an obligation under the law to evaluate the individual circumstances of employees with disabilities when considering requests for reasonable accommodations," added EEOC Chicago District Director Julianne Bowman. 

However, in a statement to FOX Business, Walmart spokesperson Randy Hargrove said "the verdict will be reduced to $300,000, which is the maximum amount allowed under federal law for compensatory and punitive damages." 

"We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year. We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available," he continued. "We’re sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth, however the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable." 

AMAZON TO SURPASS WALMART AS LARGEST US RETAILER 

Hargrove also said Walmart is "reviewing [its] options" in the wake of the verdict. 

The lawsuit, according to the Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter, had asked the court to force Walmart to reinstate Spaeth with appropriate back pay. 

Spaeth worked for Walmart for about 16 years before she was fired from its Manitowoc store in 2015 due to excessive absenteeism. Changes to her work schedule following implementation of a new computerized system in 2014 created significant difficulty for her, the federal lawsuit alleged. 

Spaeth’s condition requires that she maintain a rigid schedule of daily activities, the lawsuit said. Spaeth requested that she be allowed to resume her prior work schedule of noon to 4 p.m., because if she did not eat dinner at the same time every night, she would get sick, the lawsuit said. 

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE 

"When she requested her start and end times be adjusted by 60 to 90 minutes and to be returned to her prior schedule, Walmart failed to act on the request and instead fired her," the EEOC said, adding that Spaeth "had consistently received positive performance evaluations from her managers, according to evidence presented at trial." 

The jury found that Walmart failed to accommodate Spaeth's disability and fired her because of it, which is a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to the EEOC. 

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - New Privacy Policy

Woman with Down’s Syndrome awarded $125m by court after being fired by Walmart

The Independent 19 July, 2021 - 09:08am

Marlo Spaeth worked at a Walmart store in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, from 1999 until she was fired in 2015. Ms Spaeth was described by her managers as a “very hard worker”.

In late 2014, the store introduced a computerised scheduling system which analysed customer traffic to make sure there would be enough employees working when the store was most busy.

Ms Spaeth had her noon-4pm shift changed to 1pm-5.30pm, according to The New York Times.

The abrupt change worried Ms Spaeth. Her family reportedly told Walmart after the 2014 rota change: “She’s afraid she’s going to miss the bus. She’s afraid she’s going to miss dinner. It’s upsetting to her.”

Walmart bosses refused to switch back her working hours at her family’s request. Ms Spaeth then received two warnings for absenteeism as well as for tardiness. Eight months later, the supermarket terminated her contract, and then refused to rehire her.

In a ruling on Thursday, a jury in east Wisconsin’s federal court found that Walmart had violated the Americans With Disabilities Act, which bans discrimination against anyone with a disability.

“The jury here recognised, and apparently was quite offended, that Ms Spaeth lost her job because of needless — and unlawful — inflexibility on the part of Walmart,” said Gregory Gochanour, a lawyer with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which had sued Walmart on behalf of Ms Spaeth.

“Employers, no matter how large, have an obligation under the law to evaluate the individual circumstances of employees with disabilities when considering requests for reasonable accommodations,” said Julianne Bowman, the Chicago district director at the EEOC, in a statement.

“Ms Spaeth’s request was a simple one and denying it profoundly altered her life.”

She was awarded $125million, which Walmart argued would be reduced to $300,000 because of a federal law that caps compensatory and punitive damages at that figure. It also called the EEOC lawsuit’s demands “unreasonable”.

“We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year,” said the supermarket, in remarks reported by The Times.

“We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available.”

The Independent has contacted Walmart for comment.

Walmart loses lawsuit brought by worker with Down syndrome

NewsNation Now 19 July, 2021 - 08:22am

A Walmart store sign is visible from Route 28, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Walmart Inc. lost a federal lawsuit in Wisconsin when a jury sided with a sales associate who has Down syndrome and alleged that schedule changes exacerbated attendance problems that led to her firing.

The jury in federal court in Green Bay awarded Marlo Spaeth more than $125 million in punitive damages on Thursday, but a Walmart spokesman said Friday that under federal law, that will be reduced to the maximum allowed, which is $300,000. The jury also awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Friday in announcing the ruling. The EEOC brought the case against Walmart.

“The substantial jury verdict in this case sends a strong message to employers that disability discrimination is unacceptable in our nation’s workplaces,” EEOC Chair Charlotte Burrows said in a statement.

Walmart spokesman Randy Hargrove said the retail giant was reviewing its legal options. He said Walmart does not tolerate discrimination of any kind and routinely accommodates thousands of employees every year.

“We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available,” Hargrove said. “We’re sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth, however the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable.”

Spaeth worked for Walmart for about 16 years before she was fired from its Manitowoc store in 2015 due to excessive absenteeism. Changes to her work schedule following implementation of a new computerized system in 2014 created significant difficulty for her, the lawsuit alleged.

Spaeth’s condition requires that she maintain a rigid schedule of daily activities, the lawsuit said. Spaeth requested that she be allowed to resume her prior work schedule of noon to 4 p.m, because if she did not eat dinner at the same time every night, she would get sick, the lawsuit said. Instead of returning her to the old schedule, Walmart fired her, Spaeth alleged. Walmart also refused to rehire her when Spaeth requested it, the lawsuit said.

The jury found that Walmart failed to accommodate Spaeth’s disability and fired her because of it, which is a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the EEOC said.

© 1998 - 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. | All Rights Reserved.

A Nashville Predators prospect has come out as gay before his first NHL camp, intent on leading an “authentic life.”

From a South Carolina family that built and decorated their rental home, to two relatives of late singer Dean Martin who own a a private riverfront cabin in Utah, Airbnb has released a list of the top-ranked hosts in all 50 states across the country.

“Black Widow” ceded its No. 1 spot to an unlikely foe in its second week in theaters: The Tune Squad.

Jack in the Box is trying to hit McDonald’s right where it hurts — in its ice cream machines.

The Biden administration on Monday blamed China for a hack of Microsoft Exchange email server software that compromised tens of thousands of computers around the world earlier this year.

The Biden administration on Monday transferred a detainee out of the Guantánamo Bay detention facility for the first time, sending a Moroccan man back home years after he was recommended for discharge.

A member of the U.S. women’s gymnastics team has tested positive for COVID-19 just days before the Tokyo Olympics, NBC News reported Monday.

The Delta variant is spreading rapidly from coast to coast, with the number of new cases up more than 11,000 from just a week ago.

Jury Awards $125 Million To Former Walmart Employee With Down Syndrome

Disability Scoop 18 July, 2021 - 09:01pm

You are using an outdated browser that Disability Scoop and many other websites no longer support.

Please upgrade your browser right away to improve your experience.

by Shaun Heasley | July 19, 2021

A jury has found Walmart liable on three claims of disability discrimination in the case of a former store worker with Down syndrome. (Shutterstock)

Walmart has been ordered to pay a former employee with Down syndrome over $125 million after a jury found that the retailer failed to provide her with appropriate disability accommodations.

Walmart has been ordered to pay a former employee with Down syndrome over $125 million after a jury found that the retailer failed to provide her with appropriate disability accommodations.

The decision from a Green Bay, Wis. jury late last week comes in a lawsuit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of Marlo Spaeth who has Down syndrome and worked at a Walmart store for about 16 years.

Spaeth was always given positive evaluations, but was fired in July 2015 after having trouble adjusting to changes that were made to her longtime work schedule, the EEOC said. Spaeth asked Walmart to adjust her scheduled start and end times by 60 to 90 minutes and to restore her previous schedule, but the company did not, according to the federal agency.

After she was fired, Walmart rejected Spaeth’s request to be rehired, a decision the jury said was due to her disability or because of the need to provide accommodations. Such conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act, the EEOC said.

At the conclusion of a four-day trial, the jury awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages and $125 million in punitive damages.

“The jury here recognized, and apparently was quite offended, that Ms. Spaeth lost her job because of needless — and unlawful — inflexibility on the part of Walmart,” said Gregory Gochanour, regional attorney at the EEOC’s Chicago District Office.

Randy Hargrove, a spokesman for Walmart, said that that the verdict will be reduced to $300,000, the maximum allowed under federal law. He indicated that the company is considering its options moving forward.

“We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year,” Hargrove said in a statement. “We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available. We’re sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth, however the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable.”

Walmart has been ordered to pay a former employee with Down syndrome over $125 million after a jury found that the retailer failed to provide her with appropriate disability accommodations.

Inspired by the case of Britney Spears, a pair of senators want the government to increase oversight and produce more information about guardianships and conservatorships across the country.

A federal investigation into one state's education department over concerns that students with disabilities were being denied equal access during the COVID-19 pandemic has been dismissed.

A major department store is rolling out a new line of children's clothes with adaptive features and will also be selling a host of accessories for adults and kids with disabilities.

© 2021 Disability Scoop, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

View this article online at https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2021/07/19/jury-awards-125-million-to-former-walmart-employee-with-down-syndrome/29413/

Please check your email for instructions to complete your sign-up.

© 2008-2021 Disability Scoop, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Get the latest developmental disability news from Disability Scoop sent straight to your inbox.

Please check your email for instructions to complete your sign-up.

You're reading of free articles this month.

This is your last free article this month.

Logged in as

Already a member? Log In

Don't have an account? Join Today

Jury awards fired Walmart employee with Down syndrome $125M

The Hill 18 July, 2021 - 03:24pm

"We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year. We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available," Hargrove said. "We’re sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth, however the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable."

The Hill 1625 K Street, NW Suite 900 Washington DC 20006 | 202-628-8500 tel | 202-628-8503 fax

The contents of this site are ©2021 Capitol Hill Publishing Corp., a subsidiary of News Communications, Inc.

Jury awards $125M to woman with Down syndrome in Walmart discrimination case

FOX 5 Atlanta 18 July, 2021 - 01:43pm

A jury ruled Walmart violated the American’s with Disabilities Act when it fired a longtime employee who claimed she was wrongfully terminated.

As a result, the jury awarded $125 million to Marlo Spaeth, who has Down syndrome. According to the Herald Times Reporter, the compensation will be capped at $300,000 because of federal regulation.

The jury awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages and $125,000,000 in punitive damages after deliberating for three hours following the four-day trial.

"The substantial jury verdict in this case sends a strong message to employers that disability discrimination is unacceptable in our nation’s workplaces," said Charlotte A. Burrows, chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. "All of those who come forward to ensure the right to a workplace free of discrimination do a service to our nation. Thank you to them and to my colleagues at the EEOC whose excellent work investigating and litigating the case made this important verdict possible."

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes Down syndrome as a condition present in people with an extra chromosome. The extra chromosome affects how a person’s brain and body develop, often resulting in mental and physical challenges.

But that didn’t seem to hinder Spaeth’s performance at work. According to the EEOC, Spaeth had received positive performance evaluations in her 16-year stint with Walmart. But a schedule change in 2015 caused her significant difficulty.

When she requested to adjust her start and end times by an hour to 90 minutes, the retail giant fired her instead, the EEOC said.

"The jury here recognized, and apparently was quite offended, that Ms. Spaeth lost her job because of needless — and unlawful — inflexibility on the part of Walmart," said Gregory Gochanour, regional attorney of the EEOC’s Chicago District Office.

And when Spaeth requested to be reinstated, Walmart turned her down because they would’ve had to accommodate her disability, the EEOC claimed.

The EEOC filed a lawsuit on Spaeth’s behalf in 2017, which ended with last week’s verdict.

"Employers, no matter how large, have an obligation under the law to evaluate the individual circumstances of employees with disabilities when considering requests for reasonable accommodations," said Chicago District Director Julianne Bowman. "Ms. Spaeth’s request was a simple one and denying it profoundly altered her life."

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX Television Stations

Wisconsin jury awards woman with Down syndrome $125 million after she was fired by Walmart

Chicago Tribune 18 July, 2021 - 12:17pm

One manager wrote that she was “great with customers” and a “very hard worker.” Another manager wrote, “Marlo is a very friendly person and is a delight to have working here.”

But Spaeth’s hours suddenly shifted in November 2014, when Walmart instituted a computerized scheduling system, which the company said was based on customer traffic and was designed to ensure that enough people were working when the store was busiest.

Spaeth was expected to work from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., rather than her previous schedule of noon to 4 p.m., her lawyers said.

The abrupt change represented a significant hardship for Spaeth, who has Down syndrome and thrives on routine, her lawyers said. Spaeth repeatedly told a manager that she wanted her old schedule back, her lawyers said.

“She’s afraid she’s going to miss the bus,” her sister and guardian, Amy Jo Stevenson, said she had told a Walmart manager, according to court records. “She’s afraid she’s going to miss dinner. It’s upsetting to her. She gets too hot. She says she feels sick, and she can’t accommodate it, so we need it switched back for her.”

But the company refused to switch Spaeth back to her old schedule at the store, which was open 24 hours a day and had more than 300 employees, her lawyers said. Walmart then took disciplinary action against Spaeth twice for absenteeism and tardiness, her lawyers said.

On July 10, 2015, Walmart fired Spaeth for excessive absenteeism.

A Walmart training coordinator took Spaeth’s vest and walked her out of the store where she had worked for about 16 years. The training coordinator later testified that both she and Spaeth had been crying and that Spaeth had not understood what was happening, court records show.

Spaeth and her mother and sister met with Walmart managers and asked that she be rehired and allowed to return to her old schedule, her lawyers said. But Walmart refused to rehire her, even though her termination letter said she could be hired again, her lawyers said.

On Thursday, a jury in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, in Green Bay, found that Walmart had violated the Americans With Disabilities Act, which bans discrimination based on an employee’s disability, and awarded Spaeth $125 million in punitive damages and $150,000 in compensatory damages.

The jury, which deliberated for three hours after a four-day trial, found that Walmart had failed to provide Spaeth with a reasonable accommodation, even though she needed one because she has Down syndrome and it would not have posed a hardship to the company.

The jury also found that Walmart had fired Spaeth and then failed to rehire her because she has a disability.

“The jury here recognized, and apparently was quite offended, that Ms. Spaeth lost her job because of needless — and unlawful — inflexibility on the part of Walmart,” said Gregory Gochanour, a lawyer with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which had sued Walmart on behalf of Spaeth.

Walmart said in a statement that the verdict would be reduced to $300,000, which is the maximum amount allowed under federal law for compensatory and punitive damages.

“We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind, and we routinely accommodate thousands of associates every year,” Walmart said. “We often adjust associate schedules to meet our customers’ expectations and while Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was adjusted, it remained within the times she indicated she was available.”

The company said that it was “sensitive to this situation and believe we could have resolved this issue with Ms. Spaeth.” It added, “However, the EEOC’s demands were unreasonable.”

An EEOC lawyer declined to comment, but the agency’s website notes that compensatory and punitive damages are capped at $300,000 for employers with more 500 workers.

Walmart, which employs more than 2.3 million people around the world, is the nation’s largest private employer, with more than 1.6 million employees in the United States, according to its website.

Julianne Bowman, the Chicago district director at the EEOC, said employers, no matter how large, had an obligation under the law to evaluate the individual circumstances of employees with disabilities when considering requests for reasonable accommodations.

“Ms. Spaeth’s request was a simple one and denying it profoundly altered her life,” Bowman said in a statement.

Dr. David Smith, a former program director at the Down Syndrome Clinic of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, said in court papers that people with Down syndrome need routines to manage their day and may not have the cognitive ability to adjust well to changes.

When Walmart changed Spaeth’s schedule, the stress of the change and the pressure she felt to adapt to her new hours may have thrown her off, he said.

People with Down syndrome “make very good employees if they have the right job and an understanding employer,” said Smith, who was an expert witness for the EEOC.

“Their job becomes a major focus of their life and gives them a sense of self-worth,” he said. “When Ms. Spaeth’s schedule was changed, she was unable to adapt to that variation.”

Copyright © 2021, Chicago Tribune

Worker with Down syndrome awarded $125M by jury in lawsuit against Walmart

WJW FOX 8 News Cleveland 18 July, 2021 - 11:59am

A Walmart store sign is visible from Route 28, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Walmart has lost a federal lawsuit in Wisconsin, as a jury sided with a sales associate who has Down syndrome and alleged that schedule changes exacerbated attendance problems that led to her firing.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission brought the case and announced Friday that a jury in federal court in Green Bay awarded Marlo Spaeth more than $125 million in punitive damages. But Walmart spokesman Randy Hargrove says under federal law, that will be reduced to the maximum allowed, which is $300,000.

The jury on Thursday also awarded Spaeth $150,000 in compensatory damages. Hargrove says Walmart is reviewing its legal options.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trademark and Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Corrections officials in Alaska say a Utah man who was sentenced to 30 years in prison in the beating death of his wife on an Alaska cruise has died.

The Alaska Department of Corrections says Kenneth Manzanares was in the department’s custody, at a facility in Juneau, when he was found unresponsive in his cell Wednesday morning.

Back in January, three female employees — ages 17 and 19 — told police that between September 2019 and January 2021, Kevin Frederick assaulted them by pinching and smacking their buttocks as a form of punishment for something they did wrong while at work.

The National Weather Service in Cleveland said in a Tweet the smoke will not affect air quality since it is so high up in the atmosphere.

Dow

Business Stories