Lily Collins Got Married in ColoradoThis Weekend

Entertainment

The Cut 08 September, 2021 - 10:35am 3 views

Is Lily Collins married?

Lily Collins is officially married! After one year of engagement, the "Emily in Paris" star revealed Tuesday that she and writer/director Charlie McDowell tied the knot with a sweet wedding photo. "I've never wanted to be someone's someone more than I do yours, and now I get to be your wife. USA TODAYMary Steenburgen says she's the 'luckiest mother' after son Charlie McDowell weds Lily Collins

Is Lily Collins Phil Collins daughter?

Collins, 32, is the daughter of musician Phil Collins and his ex-wife Jill Tavelman, while her new husband, 38, is the son of film stars Malcolm McDowell and Mary Steenburgen. Sky NewsLily Collins: Emily in Paris actress marries filmmaker Charlie McDowell

Read full article at The Cut

Lily Collins Of 'Emily In Paris' Marries Charlie McDowell In Colorado

HuffPost 09 September, 2021 - 12:20pm

Emily in Paris star Collins tied the knot with Charlie McDowell in a romantic ceremony at Dunton Hot Springs, Colorado, on Saturday—with the couple sharing photos from the wedding on Instagram.

Oscar winner Steenburgen took to her own Instagram account on Tuesday to post a snapshot from the big day and express her joy at her son's marriage.

The image shows McDowell gazing adoringly at his bride, and his mother added the caption: "Charlie, my son, and Lily, my daughter-in-law!!! Thank you for letting us all bask in the sheer beauty of your love for each other.

"My heart is overflowing and it almost feels like the last few days were some sort of beautiful dream. But it is all real, and I feel like the luckiest mother in the world."

Collins replied, "Couldn't be happier to be your new daughter-in-law. Truly," adding a string of heart emojis.

"Mom, next time I get married just ask for the photo instead of posting a screenshot with the tags showing," wrote the writer and director. "Also I love you."

Steenburgen, who is now married to The Good Place star Ted Danson, shot back: "Shut up. And congratulations."

The actress also shared a photo of herself with her son, describing the celebrations as the "most glorious weekend ever."

Collins, daughter of musician Phil Collins, also shared images from the wedding, one of which showed her kissing her new husband in a rustic setting.

She wrote: "I've never wanted to be someone's someone more than I do yours, and now I get to be your wife.

"On September 4th, 2021 we officially became each other's forever. I love you beyond."

"I'll never be able to properly describe how otherworldly this past weekend was, but magical is a pretty good place to start."

Sharing the same photos on his Instagram account, Charlie McDowell, 38, wrote: "I married the most generous, thoughtful, and beautiful person I've ever known. I love you. This moment will forever play inside my head."

The couple were first romantically linked in 2019 and announced their engagement in September 2020, when Collins posted a selfie on Instagram showing her dazzling diamond ring.

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Lily Collins Wore the Most Elegant Low Bun for Her Wedding

Yahoo Lifestyle 09 September, 2021 - 12:20pm

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The courtroom episode of the Elizabeth Holmes saga debuted on Wednesday, with opening arguments in her fraud trial slated to begin. The Holmes show is expected to be so popular that federal administrators overseeing the proceedings in San Jose, California, have already notified fans that seating will be limited and “spectators” should plan accordingly.

Holmes, founder and steward of Theranos, a blood-testing outfit unable to deliver on her lofty promises to revolutionise a routine procedure, is compelling for myriad reasons — not least of which has been her ability to burn through $600m by possibly lying with epic guile. Holmes thrived in the spotlight and lived grandly before leaving patients, partners and investors in her dust.

Prosecutors want to prove that Holmes knew exactly what she was doing, to demonstrate that she acted with the intent jurors will need to see to convict her of a crime. Holmes’s lawyers are likely to paint her as a zealous innocent, someone who believed passionately in her mission and may have exaggerated, but never meant to mislead or steal. They also plan to portray her as someone so psychologically abused by her former lover and Theranos president, Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani, that she could not discern right from wrong. (Balwani, also a defendant in the case, denies all this.)

So there is much to ponder in the tale of what my Bloomberg Opinion colleague Matt Levine calls “the Blood Unicorn”. All the tawdry wackiness and possible malfeasance that came to light thanks to digging by a former The Wall Street Journal reporter, John Carreyrou, has been well documented. An HBO documentary by Alex Gibney added embroidery. A movie starring Jennifer Lawrence is on the way.

Holmes mimicked Steve Jobs by dressing entirely in black. She could stare at a camera, almost without blinking, until an interviewer asked her to share a secret. Then she would blink rapidly and look away, saying she did not have many. And so on. But two features of Holmes’s carnival-barking have stuck with me — apart from, yet also central to, what appears to be an extraordinary grift. Holmes apparently modulated her voice when she spoke publicly, giving it an artificially deep tone. She also encased her Theranos office in bulletproof glass.

Holmes seems to have believed a deeper voice conveyed greater authority, and she managed to remain in character for years, rarely stumbling. When she did, around employees or during an NPR interview, her voice hit a higher pitch. Imagine your mom or dad changing their voices like that. Or your spouse. Or your babysitter. Freaky. (Holmes’s family has said her deep voice is real.)

When you are a healthcare disrupter, you may irk rivals, but it is unlikely they will sanction shooting at your office. So why use bulletproof glass? I don’t know, but it conveys drama and signals to the world — and to impressionable employees — that what you are doing is so consequential, you may be under siege. Your life is threatened, but you soldier on (behind protective glass).

John Wu, an entrepreneur and Harvard Business School graduate who has served stints at Bain Capital and Google, recently tweeted about what he describes as his experience interviewing with Holmes for a Theranos job in 2017. Carreyrou’s reporting had already landed, and law enforcement authorities were investigating the company. Wu said Holmes appeared unfazed.

“Nothing about her indicates she was born on Earth. She deftly wound her way through my concerns with utter confidence,” Wu noted. And Wu quoted her confiding in him: “Right now, I don’t know who to trust. I need someone to trust,” she told him. “Someone who can help me become the CEO I know I can be. And I think that person … is you.”

Wu was bowled over and his scepticism faltered. Maybe he could get a big job and help Holmes rescue the beleaguered company. Then he thought she might just be a “sociopath”. And he briefly stood in awe: “I want her powers.” Unable to decide whether Holmes was “fully authentic” or “fully manufactured”, he passed on her job offer. But he still does not think she profited from her schemes “to the level of an Adam Neumann or Jeff Skilling or Bernie Madoff”.

There is a broad spectrum of behaviours to examine when you invoke that trio of businessmen, two of whom (Skilling and Madoff) went to prison for fraud. There is a longer continuum, too, stretching from John Law’s 18th-century financial scams and Charles Ponzi’s frauds of the 1920s to more recent miscreants such as Barry Minkow, Charles Keating, Reed Slatkin, the architects of the sub-prime mortgage debacle and those Fyre Festival guys.

When lots of money can be had, con artists and criminals always try getting in on the act. Some are more successful than others, usually because they are wilier — or have the ability to cast spells on greedy or gullible people who surround and enable them.

In this context, it does not matter whether Holmes profited as much as Skilling and Madoff, even though she seems to be closer to Madoff than to any other predecessor. What matters is what she did, which the courts will now try to sort out. The Onion recently predicted that Holmes will show up in court with a black-box prototype, like the machine Theranos once trotted out as a mock-up of its blood-testing device. The new machine, the Onion said, would revolutionise the legal profession by proving Holmes’s innocence.

It is unclear if Holmes will take the stand in her own defence. But if she does, I will be waiting to hear whether she speaks truthfully, in a high-pitched voice.

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The Matrix 4 Trailer Reaction - Honest Opinion

New York Daily News 09 September, 2021 - 12:20pm

The Matrix Resurrections Looks As Wild As The Sequels...Which Are Actually Good, Sorry

Vogue 09 September, 2021 - 11:12am

Have you recovered from that pulse-pounding "The Matrix Resurrections" trailer yet? No? Same here. Many of us thought this day would never come, but filmmaker Lana Wachowski is officially following the white rabbit and returning to the world of the original mind-bending classic. The three minutes of brand-new footage are full of hints and teases that demand thematic speculation and deep-dive breakdowns suggesting what's to come, but the particular blend of imagery, visuals, and tone on display also hearken back to the past; specifically, the unfairly maligned sequels that both released in 2003, "The Matrix Reloaded" and "The Matrix Revolutions." In short, "The Matrix Resurrections" appears intent on propelling the franchise in bold new directions by taking its cues from what came before — and we couldn't be more thrilled.

Most everyone can agree that 1999's "The Matrix" was a gamechanger, using a combination of cutting-edge tech and a razor-sharp script to tap into our collective fears and leave an indelible mark on pop culture. It's when the discussion strays to the unconventional sequels that opinions begin to diverge and appreciation for what the Wachowskis attempted to accomplish wanes ... but (extremely Morpheus voice) what if I told you that Neo's (Keanu Reeves) story in "The Matrix" simply isn't complete without both "Reloaded" and "Revolutions" in all their subversive, rug-pulling glory? More to the point, what if acknowledging the integral role both sequels may very well have in "The Matrix Resurrections" is simply our own version of waking up from the Matrix and finally embracing reality? Trust me and take the red pill on this one, folks.

In a twist wholly fitting of the franchise, looks could be deceiving. On the surface, the "Matrix Resurrections" trailer works overtime to remind viewers of the iconography of the beloved original: black cats; white rabbits; liquid mirrors; and a handful of familiar-looking locations ranging from a Matrix-set training ground that may or may not confirm the presence of a certain original character, a distinctive hallway full of enemy Agents, and a rooftop set piece complete with a looming helicopter. But consider what effect the very existence of this fourth film will have on the overall franchise.

Like "Reloaded," "Resurrections" has every indication of shattering the previous status quo of its predecessors and upending all our expectations in a very provocative way, denying us a happy and (seemingly) complete ending for the sake of more. The hype for "Resurrections" is at an all-time high at the moment, but it's very easy to imagine a scenario where that excitement becomes replaced with grumbling once the movie comes and goes, likely without adhering to the lofty expectations and fan-theories any given viewer has thrust upon it. After all, isn't that a big reason why so many rejected both "Reloaded" and "Resurrections" in the first place? Unmet expectations are typically a death knell for blockbusters these days, so it's only fitting that Lana Wachowski would return to free our minds from the shackles of what we want in favor of what the story needs.

By the end of "The Matrix," audiences understandably thought that they had figured everything out. Neo's triumph over Hugo Weaving's Agent Smith and his power over the Matrix itself surely meant that he was the unambiguous Chosen One, after all. He'd saved his fellow real-world characters from a nasty end at the hands (tentacles?) of the villainous AI-controlled Sentinels, he and Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) finally kissed (remember when blockbusters used to include that?), and that very Superman-esque final sequence of him stepping out from a phone booth after telling the Machines off and blasting off into the sky set certain expectations for any future sequel. That's as definitive as a definitive ending gets!

Then came "Reloaded" and "Resurrections," both of which promptly forced viewers to reevaluate everything we thought we knew. Neo's supposed destiny as the Chosen One was little more than a carefully planned lie all along, which the (actually good) monologue by the long-winded Architect lays out for us to shocking effect. Neo never transcended the system in "The Matrix," he was unwittingly playing his part in it all along. That ... didn't go over very well, to say the absolute least. "Resurrections" similarly refused to capitulate to the easy and predictable path, killing off both Neo and Trinity (yes, again) and leaving the fate of Zion relatively open-ended (humanity merely reaches an uneasy truce with the Machines, after all) with only the mysterious Oracle and the orphaned computer program Sati a witness to what Neo accomplished. And now "Resurrections" features Neo and Trinity inexplicably alive, neither of whom seem to remember much about their previous experiences. How wild is that?

But leave it to Lana Wachowski to double down even further on the storytelling instincts that many audiences rejected the first time around. Check out the repurposed iconography ripped straight from the sequels in the "Resurrections" trailer. That above shot of Neo at gunpoint in the pouring rain seems to purposefully echo the rain-soaked final duel between Neo and Smith in "Revolutions." Along the same lines, the very first thing many noticed in the trailer is that the overall color palette of the trailer is far brighter, more vibrant, and less washed-out than the trilogy — which feels of a piece with the ending of "Revolutions" and the intentionally jarring sense of color on display as the Matrix experiences a never-before-seen sunrise. And at the risk of falling prey to the fan-theory industrial complex, would it be a step too far to suggest that Priyanka Chopra's character, who we seem to get a brief glimpse of as she reads a copy of "Alice in Wonderland," might actually be a grown-up version of Sati herself who has returned and still retains her knowledge of the sacrifices Neo made for them?

The bottom line is that, as much as some may want to forget them, both "Reloaded" and "Revolutions" save "The Matrix" from being a straightforward and unquestioning rehash of the Hero's Journey. It's an exceedingly well-told and satisfying one, no doubt, but it can't help but feel incomplete without the added nuance and complexities of its challenging, frustrating, and sometimes off-putting companion pieces. For better or worse, the sequels are an integral part of Neo's journey and I'd bet anything that "The Matrix Resurrections" will follow that rabbit hole all the way down to the bottom, as well.

A Closer Look at Lily Collins’ Wedding Dress

Yahoo Lifestyle 08 September, 2021 - 05:33pm

The “Emily in Paris” actress married director Charlie McDowell on Sept. 4 at the Dunton Hot Springs in Colorado wearing a custom look from the American fashion designer, one of the few bridal gowns the brand has designed.

Collins’ wedding dress was a custom Calais-Caudry lace Ralph Lauren Collection gown. The formfitting dress was designed with allover lace and a turtleneck and paired with a hood and cape, which took almost 200 hours to craft. The dress was created at a Leavers lace weaving loom, which produces meters of delicate cotton lace, according to Ralph Lauren.

The cape was embellished with Swarovski-beaded micro flowers and silk organza petals that were placed to follow the design of the Calais-Caudry lace.

Collins gave a closer look at her wedding on Instagram on Tuesday, sharing photos of her and McDowell against a natural backdrop.

“What started as a fairytale, is now my forever reality,” she wrote in the caption. “I’ll never be able to properly describe how otherworldly this past weekend was, but magical is a pretty good place to start.”

McDowell also looked to Ralph Lauren for his wedding tuxedo, choosing a black Ralph Lauren Purple Label suit.

Collins is among a lengthy list of celebrities who’ve gotten married this year. This year has also seen the weddings of Ariana Grande, Gwen Stefani and Issa Rae, all of whom wore custom Vera Wang wedding dresses for their ceremonies.

Sign up for WWD's Newsletter. For the latest news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Her wedding dress was pretty gorgeous, too.

In an exclusive clip of Saturday's episode of "Say Yes to The Dress," a mom told her daughter that a dress she tried on had bad energy.

We love a BOLD bikini!!! 🔥🔥

Winter weddings are absolutely magical. While the weather is inevitably colder, the décor is grander, and the colors are nothing short of magnificent. Many brides think that an off-season wedding means fewer...

It's already been an entire year since their Vegas wedding!

Kate Hudson wore the two daring gowns on Saturday and Sunday for events at the annual Venice Film Festival.

The Albanian women’s wear designer won the 2021 edition of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers.

"She was always exceedingly charming, very down-to-earth, very real, not at all stuffy," the Dynasty star said of meeting the late Princess of Wales.

"The world is changing and so are you. You dress for the mess — print on print, layer on layer."

Inspired by the lifestyles of creatives, Shinsuke Nakano showed tailored basics with asymmetric details.

The gown came complete with a crystal-fringed cape.

The model is taking New York Fashion Week by storm.

The tribute event is to close Paris Fashion Week on Oct. 5.

A Closer Look at Lily Collins’ Wedding Dress

Brides 08 September, 2021 - 05:33pm

The “Emily in Paris” actress married director Charlie McDowell on Sept. 4 at the Dunton Hot Springs in Colorado wearing a custom look from the American fashion designer, one of the few bridal gowns the brand has designed.

Collins’ wedding dress was a custom Calais-Caudry lace Ralph Lauren Collection gown. The formfitting dress was designed with allover lace and a turtleneck and paired with a hood and cape, which took almost 200 hours to craft. The dress was created at a Leavers lace weaving loom, which produces meters of delicate cotton lace, according to Ralph Lauren.

The cape was embellished with Swarovski-beaded micro flowers and silk organza petals that were placed to follow the design of the Calais-Caudry lace.

Collins gave a closer look at her wedding on Instagram on Tuesday, sharing photos of her and McDowell against a natural backdrop.

“What started as a fairytale, is now my forever reality,” she wrote in the caption. “I’ll never be able to properly describe how otherworldly this past weekend was, but magical is a pretty good place to start.”

McDowell also looked to Ralph Lauren for his wedding tuxedo, choosing a black Ralph Lauren Purple Label suit.

Collins is among a lengthy list of celebrities who’ve gotten married this year. This year has also seen the weddings of Ariana Grande, Gwen Stefani and Issa Rae, all of whom wore custom Vera Wang wedding dresses for their ceremonies.

Sign up for WWD's Newsletter. For the latest news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Her wedding dress was pretty gorgeous, too.

In an exclusive clip of Saturday's episode of "Say Yes to The Dress," a mom told her daughter that a dress she tried on had bad energy.

We love a BOLD bikini!!! 🔥🔥

Winter weddings are absolutely magical. While the weather is inevitably colder, the décor is grander, and the colors are nothing short of magnificent. Many brides think that an off-season wedding means fewer...

It's already been an entire year since their Vegas wedding!

Kate Hudson wore the two daring gowns on Saturday and Sunday for events at the annual Venice Film Festival.

The Albanian women’s wear designer won the 2021 edition of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers.

"She was always exceedingly charming, very down-to-earth, very real, not at all stuffy," the Dynasty star said of meeting the late Princess of Wales.

"The world is changing and so are you. You dress for the mess — print on print, layer on layer."

Inspired by the lifestyles of creatives, Shinsuke Nakano showed tailored basics with asymmetric details.

The gown came complete with a crystal-fringed cape.

The model is taking New York Fashion Week by storm.

The tribute event is to close Paris Fashion Week on Oct. 5.

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