Listen to “Family Ties” by Baby Keem / Kendrick Lamar

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Pitchfork 27 August, 2021 - 03:02pm 20 views

Is Baby keem related to Kendrick Lamar?

After its release was teased earlier this week, we now have the collaboration between Baby Keem and his cousin, Kendrick Lamar, titled 'Family Ties'. abc.net.auKendrick Lamar hops on 'Family Ties' with his cousin Baby Keem

Opinion: How Charlie Watts infused one of the greatest rock bands with jazz

Rolling Stone 27 August, 2021 - 06:50pm

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Part of the Rolling Stones setup from 1963 until his death on 24 August, Watts provided the back-beat to their greatest hits by injecting jazz sensibilities – and swing – into the Stones’ sound.

As a musicologist and co-editor of the Cambridge Companion to the Rolling Stones, as well as a fan who has seen the Stones live more than 20 times over the past five decades, I see Watts as being integral to the band’s success.

Like Ringo Starr and other drummers who emerged during the 1960s British pop explosion, Watts was influenced by the swing and big band sound that was hugely popular in the UK in the 1940s and 1950s.

Watts wasn’t formally trained as a jazz drummer, but jazz musicians like Jelly Roll Morton, Charlie Parker, and Thelonious Monk were early influences.

In a 2012 interview with the New Yorker, he recalled how their records informed his playing style.

Watts’ first group, the Jo Jones All Stars, were a jazz band. And elements of jazz remained throughout his Stones career, providing Watts with a wide stylistic versatility that was critical to the Stones’ forays beyond blues and rock to country, reggae, disco, funk and even punk.

There was a modesty in his playing that came from his jazz learning. There are no big rock drum solos. He made sure the attention was never on him or his drumming – his role was keeping the songs going forward, giving them movement.

He also didn’t use a big kit – no gongs, no scaffolding. He kept a modest one more typically found in jazz quartets and quintets.

Likewise, Watts’ occasional use of brushes over sticks – such as in “Melody” from 1976’s “Black and Blue” – more explicitly shows his debt to jazz drummers.

But he didn’t come in with one style. Watts was trained to adapt while keeping elements of jazz. You can hear it in the R’n’ B of “(I can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” to the infernal samba-like rhythm of “Sympathy For The Devil” – two songs in which Watts’ contribution is central.

You hear similar elements in “Gimme Shelter” and other classic Rolling Stones songs – it is perfectly placed drum fills and gestures that make the song and surprise you, always in the background and never dominating.

So central was Watts to the Stones that when bassist Bill Wyman retired from the band after the 1989 “Steel Wheels” tour, it was Watts who was tasked with picking his replacement.

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He needed a bass player that would fit his style. But his choice of Darryl Jones as Wyman’s replacement was not the only key partnership for Watts. He played off the beat, complementing Richards’ very syncopated, riff-driven guitar style.

Watts did not aspire to be a virtuoso like John Bonham of Led Zeppelin or The Who’s Keith Moon - there was no drumming excess. From that initial jazz training, he kept his distance from outward gestures.

But for nearly six decades, he was the main occupant, as Richards put it, of the Rolling Stones’ legendary “engine room.”

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A true legend. I lived in Perth and when he visited places like that he made a habit of visiting and playing in local jazz clubs unannounced and without any fanfare, just for the joy of it an likely making a lot of memories for local musicians. RIP

@Christopher Byrne: this is a great story. RIP Charlie.

The word legend is used too loosely these days but Charlie Watts will always be one. His drumming sounded simple but his timing was impeccable and he played a great groove. R.I.P. Charlie.

Charlie was a great drummer. RIP. Ireland’s greatest drummer has to be Horslips’ Eamon Carr – esp when you add in his work on concept and writing the early stuff from 72-77.

@Insider at RTE: Don’t forget the late great Robbie Brennan, now there was a drummer.

@Insider at RTE: I don’t know him but I’ll check him out. For me it’s always Brian Downy – Thin Lizzy

@Insider at RTE: no doubt Eamon Carr was a great drummer, Noel Bridgeman was also up there with the best as was Brian Downey.

I wouldn’t call a drummer a musician. I was a drummer in a band and I haven’t a note in my head.

So many drummers are flashy these days. Always pushing for more. It’s refreshing to see someone like Charlie who is solid AF. No messing, straight edge. But with plenty of sexy Latin licks and jazz influence to call on when needed.

Brown sugar, Gimme Shelter and Can’t you hear me knocking are my favourites. Top guy, top drummer,lovely man by all accounts.

What a drummer. Second only to the great Bill Bruford in the jazz rock drum arena. RIP.

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Baby Keem, Kendrick Lamar Link Up for New Song 'Family Ties'

Vulture 27 August, 2021 - 07:17am

Track arrives with a video featuring Normani

Baby Keem and Kendrick Lamar have linked up for a new song, “Family Ties.”

The track is split into two distinct halves, with Baby Keem opening the track with a barrage of bars that fly over sharp drums and, at first a blazing hornfarwe, before a lilting flute loop slides in later. The beat shifts into something far grittier for Lamar’s verse, as he spits over grinding synths: “I’ve been ducking the pandemic/I’ve been ducking the social gimmicks/I’ve been ducking the overnight activist, yeah/I’m not a trending topic, I’m a prophet.”

“Family Ties” also arrives with a music video, directed by Dave Free, that features a cameo from Normani.

“Family Ties” notably marks Lamar’s first bit of new music in 2021, while last year he featured on just one song, Busta Rhymes’ “Look Over Your Shoulder.” Lamar’s last proper solo album, Damn, arrived in 2017, while the following year he anchored the Black Panther soundtrack. In a message earlier this month, Lamar said he was working on his next album, which he noted would be his last with longtime label, TDE.

Baby Keem, meanwhile, has released just one other song this year, “Durag Activity,” with Travis Scott. The rapper is prepping the follow-up to his 2019 album, Die for My Bitch, which will be titled The Melodic Blue (full details, including a release date, have yet to be announced).

In This Article: Baby Keem, Hip-Hop, Kendrick Lamar

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