Loki Episode 5 May Have Connected to WandaVision Finale

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ComicBook.com 09 July, 2021 - 11:41pm 12 views

Is Kang in Loki?

Kang the Conqueror is also Kang the Inevitable. Jonathan Majors will portray the classic villain in Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania, but everything in the Disney+ series Loki seems to be hinting at an earlier Kang appearance than we were expecting. ... However, that doesn't mean a Kang won't appear. Inverse‘Loki’ finale theory: Comics reveal a shocking Kang twist

Who plays Mobius in Loki?

Mobius is portrayed by Owen Wilson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe Disney+ series Loki (2021). wikipedia.orgMobius M. Mobius

The latest episode of Loki introduced fans of the show to The Void, a place at the end of time where all things pruned by the TVA go. As Ravonna Renslayer (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) explains it, the time-faring outfit can't actually erase matter from the timeline, so they're forced to transport it to the end of time, far from any of the events the Time-Keepers (or the real TVA mastermind) are actively plotting on the "Sacred Timeline."

It's this portion of the show that potentially teases a connection to the closing moments of WandaVision, when Billy and Tommy are erased due to the collapse of the Westview Hex. Should the same scientific rules be carried over, Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen) technically shouldn't have been able to erase that matter she created, which means maybe the boys — and the rest of Westview Wanda altered, for that matter — were sent to The Void.

If you want to get into the nitty-gritty of it all, the colors of the "deletion" visual effects used are similar colors to the pruning effect used by the TVA. Sure, there are only a certain amount of colors across the entire color wheel, but the question should be asked.

We know from the Miss Minutes explainer early on in the season the multiverse is caused due to nexus events stemming from the one Sacred Timeline. We already know Wanda is one of the leads in Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, meaning it's entirely possible the boys were sent into The Void. Since Doctor Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) no longer has the Time Stone after the events of Avengers: Infinity War and Avengers: Endgame, there would almost certainly be some Chaos Magic involved in getting to the end of time, leading to the fracture of the multiverse as Wanda and Strange try to get into The Void.

Maybe we're looking too much into it and since Wanda draws her powers from Chaos Magic, nothing really matters. Or maybe WandaVision and Loki are more dependent on each other than we initially thought. After all, Kevin Feige has said both shows will be responsible for helping set the stage for Doctor Strange 2.

Five episodes of Loki and the entire WandaVision series are now streaming on Disney+. If you haven't signed up for Disney+ yet, you can try it out here.

What other characters do you think could pop up in the Hiddleston-starring series? Let us know your thoughts either in the comments section or by hitting our writer @AdamBarnhardt up on Twitter to chat all things MCU!

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Loki promised one type of TV show, then delivered a worse one

TechRadar 11 July, 2021 - 09:04am

Has Loki missed out on its full potential?

My interest in Loki has faded fast. I'm still watching the Disney Plus show and enjoying plenty about it – Alligator Loki was a treat, as was a fleeting appearance from Richard E Grant as Old Loki – but in my eyes it's gone from being an elite-tier MCU production to a somewhat lesser one over the last three episodes. And I think this comes down to the show feeling like it's in a rush, continually upending the status quo before it's really had the chance to establish one.

Here's my problem. When the show started out, it presented us with a cool premise. Loki is plucked from his universe by the Time Variance Authority, because he'd stolen the Tesseract in the events of Avengers: Endgame and basically followed a path through time that he wasn't supposed to be on. We saw that the TVA is a bureaucratic organization with strict rules – and that they work on behalf of the Time Keepers, some godly lizard men who protect the 'sacred timeline' (which seemed like a metatextual reference to the MCU itself). 

The initial hook of the show is that Loki reluctantly teams up with the TVA to help track down a rogue, alternate universe version of Loki – one who's brutally murdered agents of the organization. It was clear from the start that the series wanted to get us invested in the relationship between Loki and Mobius (Owen Wilson). Mobius doesn't trust Loki, but has a strange fondness for him, and Loki is still devious but seems to reciprocate that affection. 

At this point, the TVA killer and rogue Loki is revealed to be Sylvie – who was kidnapped from her reality by the organization as a young girl, and now wants revenge. She then becomes the series' co-lead. The tension built up by the end of episode 2 around how deadly she is, and what she's capable of, dissipates entirely. Episode 3 cruelly doesn't feature Owen Wilson at all. 

Loki and Sylvie team up, and this forms the crux of the rest of the series. I don't mind Sylvie as a character, and I think Sophia Di Martino does a great job in matching some of Tom Hiddleston's energy while bringing something fresh to the MCU. But the weird flirty dynamic between them essentially hijacks the show, and reminds me of modern Doctor Who in a bad way. 

The problem is, once the show brought Sylvie into the story, the writers abandoned the great premise of two detectives teaming up to hunt down a rogue Loki. 

Let's not forget, the reason 'Lady Loki' seemed like such an interesting threat is that she murdered entire squads of TVA soldiers across different eras of history – and didn't seem to mind messing with the course of time as she went. We saw she was ruthless, and smarter than anyone else in the series.

By Loki episode 3, the show flips who the enemy is, by pointing out the very obvious twist that the TVA is not what it seems. But how much time have we actually spent with the TVA when we reach this discovery? Two episodes, basically. If the point is that the Time Keepers reveal in episode 4 was supposed to upend the status quo of Loki, I would argue that status quo had barely been established or earned. It meant the twist had little meaning to me as a viewer. 

What I think they've done is compressed two seasons' worth of TV into one. I would've preferred a Loki season 1 that was all about the TVA – Loki and Mobius traveling across history as part of a manhunt, essentially, and being pulled into more ludicrous historical set pieces like the Pompeii sequence we saw in episode 2. We could've spent more time in those beautifully designed TVA offices, establishing what actually motivates Judge Renslayer, and deepening the myth of the Time Keepers. The full introduction of Sylvie could've been saved for a season finale, using her instead as a deadly background threat. 

A second season, I think, could've been just about Loki, Sylvie and the truth behind the TVA. It's all been happening on fast-forward instead – like it began as a timeline-jumping detective show, then had to transform into a big blockbuster sci-fi adventure without catching its breath.

The show is going to great pains to tell us how Loki and Mobius are good pals – there's been a teary goodbye between the pair two weeks in a row – but the show hasn't worked hard enough to actually put this friendship on screen. It's curtailed this intriguing and genuinely funny partnership before it ever really got going, in favor of Loki and Sylvie's weird romance, which doesn't feel as creatively successful to me. 

Two Lokis together aren't actually that watchable, in my opinion; an arrogant Loki being mocked by a seen-it-all detective is a pairing with a great energy.  

The problem is, even though he's not really at the center of the story the writers are telling, Owen Wilson is the best thing about this show. He does something the MCU desperately needed: he changes its style of comedy. 

For some time, the MCU has felt like it's been reheating Joss Whedon's type of humor and dialogue – which works so successfully in The Avengers and Age of Ultron. Occasionally, a different comedic style enters the picture, like Shane Black's Iron Man 3 or Taika Waititi's Thor: Ragnarok. But for the most part, The Avengers has been a blueprint for so many of the MCU movies' approach to character writing, partly because Whedon defined the voice of most of its big heroes. 

That's definitely had its time, and Loki shows us another way. Owen Wilson is quiet, sardonic and deadpan as Mobius – it's a nice contrast to the wisecracks we're used to from the MCU. Why isn't he the second main character in this show? Why, after episode 2, is he fighting for screen time when the reason we were sold on Loki is because of his dynamic with the god of mischief? 

It's just a shame to see that Loki cares less about that than I do. 

Instead, the show is now becoming more familiarly Marvel-y, hence an overly long smoky dragon CGI set piece at the end of episode 5. This isn't enormously surprising, because it's mainstream entertainment and fans expect big action in their superhero fiction – and Loki is still inventive in its own way, particularly with its multiple versions of the protagonist in episode 5. I think the writers had something more compelling in their midst, though, and let it get away. 

For me, it leaves WandaVision as the one truly successful Marvel small-screen project – that had a weird, engaging premise around different eras of sitcoms and committed to it until almost the very end. Loki feels more like two shows welded together.

Still: at least I like Alligator Loki.

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Loki promised one type of TV show, then delivered a slightly worse one

TechRadar 11 July, 2021 - 09:04am

Opinion: Has Loki missed out on its full potential?

My interest in Loki has faded fast. I'm still watching the Disney Plus show and enjoying plenty about it – Alligator Loki was a treat, as was a fleeting appearance from Richard E Grant as Old Loki – but in my eyes it's gone from being an elite-tier MCU production to a somewhat lesser one over the last three episodes. And I think this comes down to the show feeling like it's in a rush, continually upending the status quo before it's really had the chance to establish one.

Here's my problem. When the show started out, it presented us with a cool premise. Loki is plucked from his universe by the Time Variance Authority, because he'd stolen the Tesseract in the events of Avengers: Endgame and basically followed a path through time that he wasn't supposed to be on. We saw that the TVA is a bureaucratic organization with strict rules – and that they work on behalf of the Time Keepers, some godly lizard men who protect the 'sacred timeline' (which seemed like a metatextual reference to the MCU itself). 

The initial hook of the show is that Loki reluctantly teams up with the TVA to help track down a rogue, alternate universe version of Loki – one who's brutally murdered agents of the organization. It was clear from the start that the series wanted to get us invested in the relationship between Loki and Mobius (Owen Wilson). Mobius doesn't trust Loki, but has a strange fondness for him, and Loki is still devious but seems to reciprocate that affection. 

At this point, the TVA killer and rogue Loki is revealed to be Sylvie – who was kidnapped from her reality by the organization as a young girl, and now wants revenge. She then becomes the series' co-lead. The tension built up by the end of episode 2 around how deadly she is, and what she's capable of, dissipates entirely. Episode 3 cruelly doesn't feature Owen Wilson at all. 

Loki and Sylvie team up, and this forms the crux of the rest of the series. I don't mind Sylvie as a character, and I think Sophia Di Martino does a great job in matching some of Tom Hiddleston's energy while bringing something fresh to the MCU. But the weird flirty dynamic between them essentially hijacks the show, and reminds me of modern Doctor Who in a bad way. 

The problem is, once the show brought Sylvie into the story, the writers abandoned the great premise of two detectives teaming up to hunt down a rogue Loki. 

Let's not forget, the reason 'Lady Loki' seemed like such an interesting threat is that she murdered entire squads of TVA soldiers across different eras of history – and didn't seem to mind messing with the course of time as she went. We saw she was ruthless, and smarter than anyone else in the series.

By Loki episode 3, the show flips who the enemy is, by pointing out the very obvious twist that the TVA is not what it seems. But how much time have we actually spent with the TVA when we reach this discovery? Two episodes, basically. If the point is that the Time Keepers reveal in episode 4 was supposed to upend the status quo of Loki, I would argue that status quo had barely been established or earned. It meant the twist had little meaning to me as a viewer. 

What I think they've done is compressed two seasons' worth of TV into one. I would've preferred a Loki season 1 that was all about the TVA – Loki and Mobius traveling across history as part of a manhunt, essentially, and being pulled into more ludicrous historical set pieces like the Pompeii sequence we saw in episode 2. We could've spent more time in those beautifully designed TVA offices, establishing what actually motivates Judge Renslayer, and deepening the myth of the Time Keepers. The full introduction of Sylvie could've been saved for a season finale, using her instead as a deadly background threat. 

A second season, I think, could've been just about Loki, Sylvie and the truth behind the TVA. It's all been happening on fast-forward instead – like it began as a timeline-jumping detective show, then had to transform into a big blockbuster sci-fi adventure without catching its breath.

The show is going to great pains to tell us how Loki and Mobius are good pals – there's been a teary goodbye between the pair two weeks in a row – but the show hasn't worked hard enough to actually put this friendship on screen. It's curtailed this intriguing and genuinely funny partnership before it ever really got going, in favor of Loki and Sylvie's weird romance, which doesn't feel as creatively successful to me. 

Two Lokis together aren't actually that watchable, in my opinion; an arrogant Loki being mocked by a seen-it-all detective is a pairing with a great energy.  

The problem is, even though he's not really at the center of the story the writers are telling, Owen Wilson is the best thing about this show. He does something the MCU desperately needed: he changes its style of comedy. 

For some time, the MCU has felt like it's been reheating Joss Whedon's type of humor and dialogue – which works so successfully in The Avengers and Age of Ultron. Occasionally, a different comedic style enters the picture, like Shane Black's Iron Man 3 or Taika Waititi's Thor: Ragnarok. But for the most part, The Avengers has been a blueprint for so many of the MCU movies' approach to character writing, partly because Whedon defined the voice of most of its big heroes. 

That's definitely had its time, and Loki shows us another way. Owen Wilson is quiet, sardonic and deadpan as Mobius – it's a nice contrast to the wisecracks we're used to from the MCU. Why isn't he the second main character in this show? Why, after episode 2, is he fighting for screen time when the reason we were sold on Loki is because of his dynamic with the god of mischief? 

It's just a shame to see that Loki cares less about that than I do. 

Instead, the show is now becoming more familiarly Marvel-y, hence an overly long smoky dragon CGI set piece at the end of episode 5. This isn't enormously surprising, because it's mainstream entertainment and fans expect big action in their superhero fiction – and Loki is still inventive in its own way, particularly with its multiple versions of the protagonist in episode 5. I think the writers had something more compelling in their midst, though, and let it get away. 

For me, it leaves WandaVision as the one truly successful Marvel small-screen project – that had a weird, engaging premise around different eras of sitcoms and committed to it until almost the very end. Loki feels more like two shows welded together.

Still: at least I like Alligator Loki.

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Loki: Every Main Character, Ranked By Likability | ScreenRant

Screen Rant 11 July, 2021 - 09:04am

However, the show has worked because Loki, along with the new characters introduced, are interesting. Some are villains who the audience is meant to hate, while others are heroes or at least anti-heroes who are entertaining. Most of them have had a standout moment or two ahead of the finale.

That makes her unlikable on the surface but it goes deeper. It's understandable that she was led to believe what she was doing was right but unlike other TVA members, even when she finds out there are lies going around, she keeps pushing forward. She turned on Mobius, a supposed friend, and took joy in what she did to Sylvie, mocking her about it.

While that clearly made him a powerful being, it was hard to like him. Boastful Loki was indeed braggadocious but he also never really acted like a hero. Instead, he was quick to turn on his close allies which was in typical Loki fashion but still worse than some other variants.

The revelation that memories from her past were used by Sylvie to get into her head made her sympathetic. Hunter C-20 was a variant with a life before the TVA but as soon as she found out, the TVA killed her. As far as the audience knows, she seemed nice enough but really didn't get a chance to show much.

That being said, she's a fun character with a cheery demeanor who is always enjoyable to see on the screen. Plus, it doesn't seem like she has much control over what she's allowed to do, so it makes it easier to like her more than characters who did actual villainous things.

Viewers also couldn't help but be intrigued at the fact that his Nexus event was created when he killed Thor, which stopped Loki in his tracks. Kid Loki showed more loyalty than Boastful Loki, remaining at the side of his friends and doing his part to help the main Loki, Sylvie, and Mobius escape.

However, that changed when she was given a look into her past by Sylvie. From that point on, Hunter B-15 understood that something was wrong at the TVA and she worked to find out more about it. Once it was confirmed, she stood up to the Timekeepers with Loki and Sylvie in heroic fashion.

Then, when it came time to help Loki and Sylvie, he did the unthinkable. Classic Loki used all of his power to distract Alioth with an incredible illusion of Asgard. He not only stepped up as a hero but he also gave his life to do so, which is something most Lokis would avoid doing.

Though he stuck to his TVA beliefs at first, it didn't take long for him to investigate and figure things out on his own. Even after getting pruned, he still fought for his friend in the Void and looks to reveal the truth about the TVA. Plus, his love for jetskis is adorable.

He goes from wanting to rule the TVA to trying to take it down because it's the right thing to do. The bonds that he forms with Sylvie and Mobius are among the tightest he has in the MCU and it shows his growth. On top of that, Loki is still quick with a quip and delivers sarcastic lines that are always fun.

Sylvie has been wildly engaging in every scene, especially relating to her bond with Loki. She had her life taken from her as a kid by the TVA, giving her motivation and making fans feel sympathy. Sylvie has proven herself to be brave, sharp, funny, and compassionate, which are all likable qualities.

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