Markets on edge ahead of today’s big inflation report

Business

Fortune 12 May, 2021 - 04:08am 24 views

Read full article at Fortune

Price of Gold Fundamental Daily Forecast - Gold Prices Down Slightly as Yields Rise Following US CPI Surge

FX Empire 12 May, 2021 - 12:43pm

At 12:18 GMT, June Comex gold futures are trading $1833.80, down $2.30 or -0.13%.

April’s consumer price index is due out at 12:30 GMT, with it expected to have grown 0.2% on the previous month, representing a 3.6% jump since last year, according to Dow Jones estimates. This jump in the headline CPI would be the largest since September 2011. These numbers compare to March’s 0.6% increase, or gain of 2.6% year over year.

On a c ore basis – which includes food and energy – the CPI is expected to have increased by 0.3% or 2.3% year over year.

For a market already spooked by the specter of inflation, the CPI could take on added importance if it shows a bigger increase than anticipated, particularly in the month over month figures.

Economists have been expecting the April data to show a big year-over-year increase to account for the base effects from last year when prices were weak due to the pandemic and economic shutdown.

The Fed has maintained that the pickup in inflation will be temporary.

“There could be a knee-jerk reaction in the market,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. But he said the Fed would take a higher number in stride and the sudden rise should be transitory.

Kevin Cummins, chief U.S. economist at NatWest Markets, said he is expecting headline inflation year-over-year to peak at 3.9% in May before beginning to go back down in June.

The CPI report comes as market expectations for inflation have been rising. According to Bleakley Advisory Group’s Peter Boockvar, the market expectations is that inflation over the next five years will average 2.71%.

“The risks are now to the upside in these inflation stats, as one who believes the risk is not transitory,” said Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley.

In breaking news, inflation accelerated at its fastest pace in more than 12 years for April as the U.S. economic recovery kicked into gear and energy prices jumped higher, the Labor Department reported Wednesday.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI), which measures a basket of goods as well as energy and housing costs, rose 4.2% from a year ago, compared to the Dow Jones estimate for a 3.6% increase. The monthly gain was 0.8%, against the expected 0.2%.

Excluding food and energy prices, the core CPI increased 3% from the same period in 2020 and 0.9% on a monthly basis. The respective estimates were 2.3% and 0.3%.

Treasury yields rose after the hotter-than-expected inflation report, driving gold prices lower.

Opinion: Industrial policy and Fed policy are the keys to confronting inequality and China

MarketWatch 12 May, 2021 - 05:00am

Consumers have lots of extra cash, and home sales are red hot.  Airlines are booking middle seats, hotel occupancies are up, Disneyland and concert venues are reopening, and crowds are forming in Times Square.

The economy is expected to grow at its best pace since the Reagan presidency, but the global economy’s ability to keep up with America’s appetite is severely stressed. Supplies of the building blocks of what we buy—computer chips and rubber for cars, plastics for hospital gowns to packaging, agricultural commodities, lumber and more—are stressed, and the material prices paid by businesses are surging.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell predicts surging prices are temporary, but he has not offered convincing evidence to support this assertion. And the Fed is not accommodating Biden’s stimulus spending as freely as it did his predecessor’s deficits.

The pandemic and new collaborative technologies unleashed a workplace revolution but now cities are in for tough post-COVID adjustments—fewer commuters, more middle- and upper-class housing replacing commercial real estate, and less business-for-lunch venues and brick-and-mortar retailing.

To accommodate health risks in the workplace and political pressures to raise wages, we can expect even more automation on factory floors, in warehouses and at retail checkout. And a paradox of structural unemployment for those without sophisticated technology, medical, business or other professional skills alongside a booming economy.

Homelessness and hunger will grow and increasingly embarrass the world’s richest nation.

The structurally unemployed need quick training and relocation assistance, but Biden’s community college proposals are aimed more at high school graduates. A displaced restaurant worker in New York City would be better served with access to a Department of Labor approved, private-sector-funded apprenticeship.

Only accelerated growth in technology industries can drive demand for more jobs and higher wages in law, medicine and more moderately paying service occupations. And in turn, reverse declining opportunities for lower-skilled workers making sandwiches, cleaning homes, staffing customer service lines and in warehouses. 

We are talking 3% growth or more—a terribly illusive target.

Powell is willing to endure prolonged inflation above 2% to find it, but he must better manage the 10-year Treasury rate, which powerfully affects mortgage rates, car loans and the capital available in equity markets for business investment and high-tech startups.

Managing the 10-year Treasury rate is as important as the Fed’s official monetary policy target—the federal funds rate. The time has arrived to announce a formal policy for yield curve management.

Biden recognizes Americans must up their game. Subsidies lavished on high tech in China, Korea and elsewhere translate into lost jobs in America making computer chips and 5G infrastructure but also jobs in law, business, medicine, restaurants, fitness centers, and dry cleaners.

Fewer jobs and downward pressure on wages for the lower half isn’t just about import competition, automation and monopoly power in labor markets the left rails about. It’s also about the Republican Party’s failure to recognize that industrial policy is not a moral failure but a response to the China challenge for global leadership. And the Democratic Party’s penchant to see every spending imperative as an opportunity to drive its agenda on climate change, sexism, racism and classism.

Without meeting China head on and without artificial constraints, neither the purity of free markets nor creating of the Peaceable Kingdom are possible.

Biden’s infrastructure plan would spend too little on roads and bridges and too much on the Green New Deal and other progressive causes but does get one thing right. Its support for R&D, manufacturing, internet access and semiconductors is spot on.

Only by continuing leadership in technology across the board—not in jobs count but in patents—can America have a big-enough pie to accomplish a just society.

Some gas stations from Florida to Virginia run out of gasoline as Colonial Pipeline works to restore service on a key East Coast fuel artery following a ransomware attack, according to fuel-price tracker GasBuddy.

EUR/JPY analysis: Breakout occurs

FXStreet 12 May, 2021 - 03:42am

The common European currency declined by 52 pips or 0.39% against the Japanese Yen on Tuesday. A breakout occurred through the lower boundary of an ascending channel pattern during yesterday's trading session.

Given that a breakout has occurred, the exchange rate could continue to edge lower during the following trading session. The potential target for the currency pair would be near the 131.40 area.

However, a support cluster formed by the weekly pivot point and the 200– hour simple moving average at 131.73 could provide support for the currency exchange rate within this session. 

This overview can be used only for informational purposes. Dukascopy SA is not responsible for any losses arising from any investment based on any recommendation, forecast or other information herein contained.

EUR/USD is under pressure below 1.2150 as the dollar benefits from concerns over the escalation in the Middle East and fears of rising interest rates.

GBP/USD is trading above 1.41 but below the highs. The risk-off mood boosts the safe-haven US dollar, while sterling is underpinned by upbeat UK GDP data. The economy shrank by 1.5% in Q1, better than expected. US inflation data is awaited. 

Gold pressured amid fears of rising inflation, interest rates. US dollar’s haven demand lifted on Middle East tensions. Disappointing US CPI could revive gold’s bullish momentum.

Bitcoin price reaching over $64,000 has priced out many investors in the market that has missed many of its bull rallies. Investors are increasingly looking into altcoins, which have absolute prices that are cheaper than the leading cryptocurrency.

American consumer prices are set to rise by the most in a decade as the base effect from last year’s pandemic collapse reaches its height. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is expected to climb 0.2% in April.

Note: All information on this page is subject to change. The use of this website constitutes acceptance of our user agreement. Please read our privacy policy and legal disclaimer.

Trading foreign exchange on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The high degree of leverage can work against you as well as for you. Before deciding to trade foreign exchange you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment and therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts.

Opinions expressed at FXStreet are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinion of FXStreet or its management. FXStreet has not verified the accuracy or basis-in-fact of any claim or statement made by any independent author: errors and Omissions may occur.Any opinions, news, research, analyses, prices or other information contained on this website, by FXStreet, its employees, partners or contributors, is provided as general market commentary and does not constitute investment advice. FXStreet will not accept liability for any loss or damage, including without limitation to, any loss of profit, which may arise directly or indirectly from use of or reliance on such information.

US CPI Preview: Forecasts from eight major banks | Forex Crunch

Forex Crunch 12 May, 2021 - 02:56am

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) reading from the US at 13:30 GMT is pointing to a rise in the year-on-year reading to +3.6%. That would be the highest annual CPI number since September 2011 if realised, and up from 2.6% in March. As we get closer to the release time, here are the forecasts by the economists and researchers of eight major banks regarding the upcoming data.

“Consumer price inflation is likely to jump to close to 4% as prices in a vibrant reopening economy contrast starkly with those from 12 months ago when the economy was in lockdown and companies were slashing prices to generate cash flow. These ‘base’ effects should ease as we move through the third quarter, but we continue to believe that inflation could be more persistent than we have seen in previous economic cycles. Commodity prices, freight charges, supply chain disruptions, surging house prices and rising employment costs all factor into our thinking. At the same time, the positive growth and jobs story we are seeing will mean any spare capacity will be swiftly eaten up. This leads us to conclude that the Federal Reserve is more likely to raise interest rates in early 2023 rather than leave it until 2024 as they are currently signalling.”

“We advise against extrapolating, consistent with Fed officials citing ‘transitory’ factors, but a surge in used vehicle prices, along with strong reopening-related gains in airfares and hotel rates, likely led to a sharp pickup in the core CPI. Moreover, base effects will add to the YoY data. We forecast 3.7%/2.5% YoY for total/core prices, up from 2.6%/1.6% in March.”

“US CPI growth is expected to jump to 3.7% YoY in April and 2.3% core rate in April. Markets will continue to look for signs on firming underlying price growth outside of transitory price increases from weak year-ago levels.”

“We expect the core index to have gained 0.3% for the second month in a row. As a result, the annual core inflation rate could move up from 1.6% to a 14-month high of 2.2%. Headline prices, meanwhile, could have risen 0.2% MoM despite a slight decline in seasonally-adjusted gasoline prices. This gain, combined with a strongly positive base effect, should allow the annual rate to rise from 2.6% to 3.6%, the highest figure recorded since September 2011.”

“We expect US core inflation to rise by 0.3% MoM (2.3% YoY) in April, with headline also increasing by 0.3% MoM (3.7% YoY). At his Q&A session post the 27-28 April FOMC meeting, Fed Chair Powell said base effects will contribute around 1.0 and 0.7 percentage points to headline and core CPI (YoY) respectively. Despite a stronger-than-expected March CPI and surveys pointing to intense pricing pressure, market measures of longer-term inflation compensation have eased over the past month. Fed officials remain of view that the forthcoming rise in inflation will be temporary. Powell says a persistent rise in inflation is unlikely until maximum employment is achieved. The latter is some way off. That said, they will watch inflation expectations closely to ensure they remain consistent with their 2% target.”

“Core readings for CPI and PPI could both be hotter than what’s needed for 2% inflation, a reminder that the upturn we’re seeing in inflation isn’t just about gasoline being more expensive than a year earlier. April’s acceleration in inflation will reflect base effects, and supply chain bottlenecks amidst solid demand from reopenings. It’s likely that total CPI inflation accelerated to 3.6%, and core inflation to 2.3%. We see scope for a more sustained rise in inflation towards the 2½% mark in 2022, on a broad-based tightening in the labor market.” 

“We expect a large 0.4% MoM gain in core consumer prices in April. Together with base effects, that would push core inflation up to 2.4%, and headline inflation to a decade-high of 3.8%.” 

“We expect a solid 0.301% increase in core CPI in April but would not be surprised by an even stronger increase that rounds to 0.4%. More persistent increases in shelter prices would be a sign that underlying inflation pressures are picking up and core PCE inflation above 2% YoY can be sustained through 2022.”

Forex Crunch is a site all about the foreign exchange market, which consists of news, opinions, daily and weekly forex analysis, technical analysis, tutorials, basics of the forex market, forex software posts, insights about the forex industry and whatever is related to Forex.

Foreign exchange (Forex) trading carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The risk grows as the leverage is higher. Investment objectives, risk appetite and the trader's level of experience should be carefully weighed before entering the Forex market. There is always a possibility of losing some or all of your initial investment / deposit, so you should not invest money which you cannot afford to lose. The high risk that is involved with currency trading must be known to you. Please ask for advice from an independent financial advisor before entering this market. Any comments made on Forex Crunch or on other sites that have received permission to republish the content originating on Forex Crunch reflect the opinions of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinions of any of Forex Crunch's authorized authors. Forex Crunch has not verified the accuracy or basis-in-fact of any claim or statement made by any independent author: Omissions and errors may occur. Any news, analysis, opinion, price quote or any other information contained on Forex Crunch and permitted re-published content should be taken as general market commentary. This is by no means investment advice. Forex Crunch will not accept liability for any damage, loss, including without limitation to, any profit or loss, which may either arise directly or indirectly from use of such information.

US Dollar Index eases from tops near 90.40, focus on US CPI | Forex Crunch

Forex Crunch 12 May, 2021 - 02:51am

The greenback, in terms of the US Dollar Index (DXY), faltered around the 90.40 region and sparked a corrective downside to the 90.25/20 band at the time of writing.

The index extends the erratic performance so far this week, although it looks well supported by the 90.00 neighbourhood for the time being. Indeed, despite the prevailing bearish note around the buck, sellers still remain unable to convincingly breach the 90.00 mark.

Increased volatility (as per the recent rise in the VIX, aka “the panic index”), market chatter regarding higher inflation in the next months plus a corrective upside in US yields have all been collaborating in preventing the index to drop further south of the 90.00 yardstick in past hours.

In the US data space, April’s inflation figures gauged by the CPI will take centre stage later on Wednesday. In addition, weekly MBA Mortgage Applications is due along with the EIA’s report on US crude oil inventories.

Back to the Fed, permanent voter and dovish member R.Clarida will speak later on Wednesday followed by speeches by Atlanta Fed R.Bostic (voter, centrist) and Philly Fed P.Harker (2023 voter, hawkish).

On Tuesday, FOMC Governor L.Brainard noted the need for patience to achieve the Fed’s goals amidst prevailing risks. Both she and Atlanta Fed R.Bostic reiterated that bouts of higher prices should be deemed as temporary and defended the continuation of the accommodative stance from the Fed. In addition, San Francisco Fed M.Daly and Cleveland Fed L.Mester noted the positive outlook for the economy in spite of the latest miss in the labour market report.

The index extends the choppy activity so far this week, while the 90.00 area still emerges as a tough nut to crack for USD-sellers. Recent bouts of risk aversion lent some much-needed oxygen to the dollar, although the negative stance on the currency appears to dominate the broader scenario for the time being. This view has been exacerbated following April’s NFP, hurting at the same time the sentiment surrounding the imminent full re-opening of the US economy, which is in turn sustained by the unabated strength in domestic fundamentals, the solid vaccine rollout and once again the resurgence of the market chatter regarding an anticipated tapering. The latter comes in despite Fed’s efforts to talk down this scenario, at least for the next months.

Key events in the US this week: April CPI, Core CPI (Wednesday) – Initial Claims (Thursday) – Retail Sales, Industrial Production, flash May Consumer Sentiment (Friday).

Eminent issues on the back boiler: Biden’s plans to support infrastructure and families worth nearly $4 trillion. US-China trade conflict under the Biden’s administration. Tapering speculation vs. economic recovery. US real interest rates vs. Europe. Could US fiscal stimulus lead to overheating?

Now, the index is gaining 0.05% at 90.21 and a breakout of 91.06 (100-day SMA) would open the door to 91.43 (weekly/monthly high May 5) and finally 91.70 (50-day SMA). On the flip side, immediate contention lines up at 89.98 (monthly low May 11) followed by 89.68 (monthly low Feb.25) and then 89.20 (2021 low Jan.6).

Forex Crunch is a site all about the foreign exchange market, which consists of news, opinions, daily and weekly forex analysis, technical analysis, tutorials, basics of the forex market, forex software posts, insights about the forex industry and whatever is related to Forex.

Foreign exchange (Forex) trading carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The risk grows as the leverage is higher. Investment objectives, risk appetite and the trader's level of experience should be carefully weighed before entering the Forex market. There is always a possibility of losing some or all of your initial investment / deposit, so you should not invest money which you cannot afford to lose. The high risk that is involved with currency trading must be known to you. Please ask for advice from an independent financial advisor before entering this market. Any comments made on Forex Crunch or on other sites that have received permission to republish the content originating on Forex Crunch reflect the opinions of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinions of any of Forex Crunch's authorized authors. Forex Crunch has not verified the accuracy or basis-in-fact of any claim or statement made by any independent author: Omissions and errors may occur. Any news, analysis, opinion, price quote or any other information contained on Forex Crunch and permitted re-published content should be taken as general market commentary. This is by no means investment advice. Forex Crunch will not accept liability for any damage, loss, including without limitation to, any profit or loss, which may either arise directly or indirectly from use of such information.

Stock futures fall ahead of key inflation report

Fox Business 12 May, 2021 - 02:41am

Quotes delayed at least 15 minutes. Real-time quotes provided by BATS BZX Real-Time Price. Market Data provided by Interactive Data (Terms & Conditions). Powered and Implemented by Interactive Data Managed Solutions. Company fundamental data provided by Morningstar. Earnings estimates data provided by Zacks. Mutual fund and ETF data provided by Lipper. Economic data provided by Econoday. Dow Jones & Company Terms & Conditions.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - Updated Privacy Policy

Spotlight Asset Group CIO Shana Sissel, Belpointe chief strategist David Nelson and Thru the Cycle President John Lonski provide insights into today’s markets. 

U.S. equity futures are trading lower, the day after a big selloff and ahead of a report on consumer inflation.

The major futures indexes suggest a decline of 0.3% when the Wednesday session begins on Wall Street.

All eyes will be on the April consumer price index Wednesday morning as markets continue to reel amid worries about inflation.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics is expected to say the CPI rose 0.2% month-over-month in April, below February’s 0.6% spike. On a year-over-year basis watch for prices to jump 3.6%. That would be the fastest growth in almost a decade and up a full percentage point from March’s 2.6% rise.  If you factor out volatile food and energy costs, the core consumer price index likely rose 0.3% last month and is expected to increase 2.3% annually.

In Europe, London's FTSE added 0.8%, Germany's DAX gained 0.2% and France's CAC rose 0.2%.

Asian stock markets retreated Wednesday as investors looked ahead to U.S. data they worry will show inflation is picking up.

The Nikkei 225 in Tokyo tumbled 1.6%, the Hang Seng in Hong Kong gained 0.8% and China's Shanghai Composite Index added 0.6%.

On Tuesday, Wall Street's benchmark S&P 500 index lost 0.9% amid concern inflation might accelerate, hampering an economic recovery and dragging on share prices.

Investor concern is increasing following a price rise for industrial materials including copper and crude oil.

The S&P 500 fell to 4,152.19. The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank 1.4% in its worst day since February. The Nasdaq composite lost 0.1% to 13,389.43.

Commodity prices have been rising, particularly for industrial metals such as copper and platinum, as well as for energy commodities like gasoline and crude oil.

Big technology companies were among the biggest decliners for a second day. Tech stocks get most of their valuation from future profits that might be less valuable if they are eroded by inflation.

Investors have worried about inflation since bond yields spiked earlier this year, though yields have mostly stabilized since then. The yield on the 10-year Treasury held edged up to 1.62% Wednesday from 1.61% on Tuesday.

The Federal Reserve has said the U.S. economy will be allowed to "run hot" to ensure a recovery is established. Despite that, investors worry rising prices might pressure central banks to pull back stimulus and raise near-zero interest rates.

In energy markets, benchmark U.S. crude gained 76 cents to $66.04 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 36 cents on Tuesday to $65.28. Brent crude, used to price international oils, added 74 cents to $69.28 per barrel in London. It rose 23 cents the previous session to $68.55.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - Updated Privacy Policy

USD/JPY remains poised for losses beyond 108.50 ahead of US CPI data

FXStreet 11 May, 2021 - 08:54pm

The sudden buying interest in the US dollar keeps USD/JPY higher in the Asain session. The pair trades near the session’s high and accumulates a 30 pip movement from the lows of 108.60.

At the time of writing, the USD/JPY pair is trading at 108.82, up 0.19% on the day.

The US dollar index (DXY), which tracks the movement of the greenback against the six major rivals, lacks the strength and remains at the multi-month on Tuesday. US Treasury yields are slightly higher at 1.62% following a solid three-year note auction on Tuesday, and 10-and 30-year note offerings later in the week.

The US dollar still faces heat from the disappointing US NFP data. Despite US job opening data hitting a record high in March, job openings rose by 597K to 8.123 million, well above the market expectations at 7.5 million. The data aids the US dollar to recover from 89.98 multi-month lows.

The Federal Reserve (Fed) official’s comments on inflation and the US job creation,  cemented the outlook of an extended era of easing monetary policy with no interest rate hike expected sooner. 

On the other hand, the Japanese yen struggles with domestic issues on rising coronavirus infections. The Bank of Japan (BOJ) policymakers warned of the risk to the recovery as the pandemic curbs negatively impact service consumption, and said the economic recovery is backed by external demand. The not so optimistic outlook for the Japanese yen provided a cushion for the pair.

In Addition to that, the geopolitical uncertainty over Israel and Palestine boosted the demand for the US dollar as a safer asset in the time of uncertainties. 

As for now, traders turn their attention to the release of the Japanese Leading Economic Coincident Index PREL for March. The major area of focus would be the US Consumer Price Inflation (CPI) data as the deviation in the reading could negatively impact the pair.

Information on these pages contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Markets and instruments profiled on this page are for informational purposes only and should not in any way come across as a recommendation to buy or sell in these assets. You should do your own thorough research before making any investment decisions. FXStreet does not in any way guarantee that this information is free from mistakes, errors, or material misstatements. It also does not guarantee that this information is of a timely nature. Investing in Open Markets involves a great deal of risk, including the loss of all or a portion of your investment, as well as emotional distress. All risks, losses and costs associated with investing, including total loss of principal, are your responsibility. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of FXStreet nor its advertisers.

EUR/USD remains pressured towards 1.2100 amid a broadly firmer US dollar. Trading sentiment dwindles amid mixed updates, light calendar and pre-US CPI caution. S&P 500 Futures drop 0.1%, US Treasury yields seesaw near previous day’s close.

GBP/USD snaps a three-day winning streak, consolidates gains near the 11-week top above 1.41. UK warns over NI post-Brexit trade deal, French-British tension ease in Jersey waters. UK Q1 GDP is expected to contract, US CPI may keep reflation fears on the table.

EUR/USD remains pressured towards 1.2100 amid a broadly firmer US dollar. Trading sentiment dwindles amid mixed updates, light calendar and pre-US CPI caution. S&P 500 Futures drop 0.1%, US Treasury yields seesaw near previous day’s close.

Dogecoin price corrected over 40% from the May 8 high, but outstanding support at the April high keeps bullish aspirations focused on $1.00. Daily RSI shows a bearish momentum divergence. IntoTheBlock IOMAP metric shows considerable support just above the April high.

American consumer prices are set to rise by the most in a decade as the base effect from last year’s pandemic collapse reaches its height. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is expected to climb 0.2% in April, according to the consensus forecast from the Reuters survey of economists.

Note: All information on this page is subject to change. The use of this website constitutes acceptance of our user agreement. Please read our privacy policy and legal disclaimer.

Trading foreign exchange on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The high degree of leverage can work against you as well as for you. Before deciding to trade foreign exchange you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment and therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts.

Opinions expressed at FXStreet are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinion of FXStreet or its management. FXStreet has not verified the accuracy or basis-in-fact of any claim or statement made by any independent author: errors and Omissions may occur.Any opinions, news, research, analyses, prices or other information contained on this website, by FXStreet, its employees, partners or contributors, is provided as general market commentary and does not constitute investment advice. FXStreet will not accept liability for any loss or damage, including without limitation to, any loss of profit, which may arise directly or indirectly from use of or reliance on such information.

Inflation

Business Stories