Marshawn Lynch, Shawn Kemp, Sue Bird among Seattle stars announcing Kraken expansion draft picks

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ESPN 19 July, 2021 - 01:43pm 34 views

When do the Seattle Kraken draft?

The Seattle Kraken are officially on the clock. On Sunday, the NHL released the available and protected lists for the 30 other teams ahead of the Kraken's expansion draft, which will take place July 21 (8 p.m. ET on ESPN2). USA TODAYNHL expansion draft: Protected lists ahead of Seattle Kraken's roster selection

Is the NHL expansion draft televised?

When is the NHL Expansion Draft taking place? The draft will take place on July 21, 2021, at Gas Works Park in Seattle, and it will be televised in both the United States and Canada. Coverage will begin at 20:00 EDT on ESPN2 in the US, whilst Canadian viewers will need to tune into Sportsnet or SN NOW. MARCA.comThe 2021 NHL Expansion Draft: Date, time, TV channel and rules

When are protected lists due NHL?

The deadline for the NHL to approve and distribute the protection lists is 10 a.m. Sunday. Once that is done, Seattle's RFA/UFA interview period immediately begins for exposed players. WDIV ClickOnDetroitFollow updates: NHL teams announce Seattle expansion draft protection lists

Calgary Flames set their Kraken expansion protection list: Has Mark Giordano played his last game in Calgary?

The Athletic 19 July, 2021 - 04:01pm

Flames set their Kraken expansion protection list: Has Mark Giordano played his last game in Calgary?

Panthers announce protected list ahead of Kraken's expansion draft

South Florida Sun Sentinel 19 July, 2021 - 04:01pm

With the Seattle Kraken’s expansion draft coming up on Wednesday, the Florida Panthers had to submit their list of protected players Saturday night.

Seattle will select one player from each team excluding the Vegas Golden Knights for a total of 30 players. They must select at least 14 forwards, nine defensemen and three goalies.

Players with no movement clauses, such as Jonathan Huberdeau, Aleksander Barkov and Sergei Bobrovsky were required to be protected by Florida.

The Panthers were also required to expose two forwards under contract for the 2021-22 season who played at least 40 NHL games the prior season, or played in at least 70 NHL games in the prior two seasons.

Mason Marchment only played in 33 games last season, explaining why he was protected ahead of players like Frank Vatrano and Noel Acciari.

The Kraken have an exclusive window from July 18-21 to interview and sign pending free agents who were left unprotected in the expansion draft. If they sign a player in that window it counts as their pick from that players’ former team.

This means that Panthers fans may not have to wait until Wednesday night to see which player is leaving.

“All signs point to the expansion Seattle Kraken signing and selecting goaltender Chris Driedger from the Florida Panthers as part of the expansion draft process,” according to TSN.

The expansion draft will take place Wednesday at 8 p.m. on ESPN2.

Here is the full list of players the Panthers protected for the expansion draft, and who they left unprotected:

Protected — Aleksander Barkov (F), Sam Bennett (F), Anthony Duclair (F), Patric Hornqvist (F), Jonathan Huberdeau (F), Mason Marchment (F), Carter Verhaeghe (F), Aaron Ekblad (D), Gustav Forsling (D), MacKenzie Weegar (D), Sergei Bobrovsky (G)

Unprotected — Noel Acciari (F), Patrick Bajkov (F), Juho Lammikko (F), Ryan Lomberg (F), Brad Morrison (F), Aleksi Saarela (F), Frank Vatrano (F), Lucas Wallmark (F), Alex Wennberg (F), Scott Wilson (F), Lucas Carlsson (D), Kevin Connauton (D), Tommy Cross (D), Radko Gudas (D), Noah Juulsen (D), Brady Keeper (D), Brandon Montour (D), Markus Nutivaara (D), Ethan Prow (D, Anton Stralman (D), Philippe Desrosiers (G), Chris Driedger (G), Sam Montembeault (G)

Picking Carey Price would be bold, risky move for Seattle Kraken

NHL 19 July, 2021 - 01:31pm

Price has been the face of the franchise for more than a decade, and just backstopped the team to a stunning appearance in the Stanley Cup Final.

For Montreal general manager Marc Bergevin, it is a very calculated gamble.

The Canadiens did not want to lose Jake Allen for nothing and could not find a suitable trade for him ahead of the 3 p.m. ET roster freeze on Saturday. Rather than make a bad trade or risk losing him, Bergevin decided to protect him and (at the suggestion of Price) play a rather bold game of chicken with Seattle.

The thought process is simple: Montreal is banking on the fact that Seattle will not want to take on the remainder of Price’s contract that counts more than $10M against the cap per season for the next five years, especially as word leaks out that he could need surgery this offseason. When the Golden Knights entered the league in 2017 their expansion draft selections were loaded with players on short-term or expiring contracts to keep their salary cap flexibility in place. Kraken GM Ron Francis has already talked about how salary cap space is their big advantage, and it is hard to imagine they want to eat up too much of it on big-money, veteran players that other teams want to get rid of.

But Price is a very different situation. The Canadiens almost certainly do not want to lose him, and his exposure is entirely strategic based on the idea that they will not lose him.

The problem with that thought process is that if we are to believe reports that have surfaced since the expansion lists were set, Seattle is at least strongly considering the idea and apparently has the OK from ownership to take on the remainder of Price’s contract, even with his newly report health concerns.

It would be the type of move that seemed almost beyond comprehension just a few weeks ago and would be peak chaos for the NHL offseason.

The obvious comparison here would be Vegas’ selection of Marc-Andre Fleury from the Penguins back.

Fleury was (and still is) a wildly popular player that was an instant marketing attraction for a new team trying to build a following. Price not only has that same sort of big name appeal, but he is also from the Pacific Northwest, just took a team to the Stanley Cup Final, and plays a position that could make him a significant impact player for a franchise just starting out.

It is not a stretch of a comparison.

Price, 33, is the same age that Fleury was when the Golden Knights selected him, and while his play the past couple of years has regressed from his peak, it is still on par with what Fleury was doing when he arrived in Vegas.

Price has a .912 all situations save percentage and a .918 even-strength save percentage over the past three seasons, while also being money in each of his playoff appearances.

Fleury has a .918 all situations save percentage and a .922 even-strength mark in the three seasons before he went to the Golden Knights.

A slight edge to Fleury, but not dramatically so. Especially when you consider Fleury was playing behind a better team (a two-time Stanley Cup champion).

Here is where the Fleury-Price comparison differs.

When Vegas added Fleury, he had two years remaining on his contract at a $5.5M salary cap hit. It was a low-risk move. Even if Fleury did not pan out as they had hoped, it was not going to be a cap-crushing contract or become an albatross. If anything, it probably would have been a tradable piece.

Price’s contract is an entirely different beast, still having five years at $10.5M per season remaining.

That’s a five-year, $52.5M investment (salary cap investment — it would be $44M in actual dollars) for a 33, and soon-to-be, 34-year-old goalie that might need surgery this offseason.

Even after re-signing Fleury to a three-year contract their overall investment in him was $31M over five years. And it is worth pointing out that by year three they had to acquire and re-sign another goalie (Robin Lehner) to complement him, and who finished each of the past two seasons starting over Fleury.

If Price does not provide what you hope, that is a big contract eating away at your one big advantage (salary cap space) tied to a player that will have a no-movement clause, complete control over where (or if) he goes if you can even find a team willing to take it. You could be end up being stuck.

It is an obviously intriguing idea, and one that Seattle has to seriously consider. A great goalie can completely change your franchise, and Price has a track record of being that type of player and still has the occasional ability to play at that level.

There is also an obvious PR and marketing win here with selecting him and making him the face of the franchise.

At the end of the day though it is still a results-based business based on wins. Is Price, at his age, and at that contract, still capable of playing at that level on a consistent basis? Of the 59 goalies that have appeared in at least regular 50 games over the past three seasons Price is 24th, 30th, and 20th respectively in all situations save percentage, even-strength save percentage and high-danger save percentage (via Natural Stat Trick).

Those are certainly not bad numbers, but they are not great, either. And for $10.5M per year against the cap over the next five years you better be expecting greatness.

There are a handful of goalies available in this very expansion draft that have comparable, or even better, numbers over the same time period with considerably less risk financially. It all comes down to how confident Seattle is that Price can be the goalie we saw in the playoffs on a more consistent basis, and how important it is for them to have a big name to build around.

It probably will not outweigh the on-ice risks. So for as bold as it would be, it would probably be best if Seattle went in a different direction with its goaltending position.

Adam Gretz is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @AGretz.

Seattle Kraken expansion draft: Carey Price among unprotected players

710 ESPN Seattle 18 July, 2021 - 12:11pm

After backstopping the Montreal Canadiens to the Stanley Cup Final, Carey Price has been left unprotected for the Seattle Kraken expansion draft.

Price could become the face of the NHL’s 32nd franchise if general manager Ron Francis and his staff decide to take on one of the biggest contracts in hockey. He agreed to waive a clause in his contract to be exposed so Montreal could protect cheaper backup Jake Allen, but his goaltending ability, off-ice marketability and ties to the Pacific Northwest could make Price an attractive option even with a salary cap hit of $10.5 million for five more years.

The 2015 MVP and Vezina Trophy winner is the biggest star left unprotected for the Kraken to select, but there’s plenty of other talent available.

St. Louis winger Vladimir Tarasenko is an option two years removed from hoisting the Stanley Cup after asking the Blues for a trade. Calgary exposed captain and 2019 Norris Trophy-winning defenseman Mark Giordano. And Carolina surprisingly made forward Nino Niederreiter available.

The league released the protected lists of all 30 teams eligible for the expansion draft Sunday morning. Seattle will pick one player from everyone except Vegas — which just went through this process in 2017 — and announce those selections at the expansion draft Wednesday night.

Price is the most intriguing possible for Seattle, and the location likely helped convince the soon-to-be 34-year-old to waive his no-movement clause to be exposed. He played for the Western Hockey League’s Tri-City Americans a few hours drive away, and his wife, Angela, is from Kennewick, Washington.

That could make Price a natural cornerstone for the Kraken to build around like the Golden Knights did with goalie Marc-Andre Fleury, who was fresh off winning the Cup with Pittsburgh. Price and the Canadiens lost to Tampa Bay in five games in the final.

Best save of Carey Price's (@CP0031) career so far?

You be the judge ⬇️ pic.twitter.com/bLpTEK6Iok

— NHL (@NHL) February 19, 2021

The back-to-back champion Lightning have easily the deepest pool of available players. Top-line winger Ondrej Palat, longtime forward Alex Killorn, third-line center Yanni Gourde and young defenseman Cal Foote are all exposed. Squeezed by the cap that’s remaining flat at $81.5 million, they could also work out a side deal with the Kraken to take Spokane native Tyler Johnson and his $5 million price tag for three more seasons.

Seattle has all the leverage and the benefit of cap space.

“The one thing that we think is extremely, extremely valuable in this environment is cap space,” Francis said Saturday. “We’ve got $81.5 million of cap space to play with, so that’s certainly something that we want to make sure we try and take advantage of moving forward.”

Seattle has certain minimums it must meet in the expansion draft, including selecting at least 20 players under contract for next season with salaries totaling at least $48 million. The Kraken must pick at least 14 forwards, nine defensemen and three goaltenders.

Beyond Price, Dallas’ Ben Bishop, Florida’s Chris Driedger and Washington’s Vitek Vanecek are among the available goalies. Driedger is a pending free agent, but the Kraken have an exclusive negotiating window until Wednesday to sign him and others to a new contract.

Colorado captain Gabriel Landeskog, Toronto’s Alex Kerfoot and newly acquired Jared McCann, Pittsburgh’s Jason Zucker and Philadelphia’s James van Riemsdyk join the Lightning trio, Niederreiter and Tarasenko as the most productive forwards available.

Tarasenko’s Blues teammate Vince Dunn, New Jersey’s personable P.K. Subban and Washington’s Justin Schultz are among the unprotected defensemen — a position not quite as deep in high-end talent. That’s by design.

“Teams knew we were coming, and they’ve had four years to prepare,” Francis said.

Kraken Expansion Draft Sue Bird

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