Mercy Springfield to require all current, future workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19

Health

KY3 07 July, 2021 - 11:25am 37 views

Mercy Springfield announced a Sept. 30, 2021 deadline for vaccinating all employees. Those who refuse to get vaccinated could possibly face termination.

Physicians, staff, vendors and volunteers through Mercy Springfield will all be required to get vaccinated.

“We are leading by example. We are blazing a trail,” says Brent Hubbard, president and COO of Mercy Hospital Springfield on the decision to require all staff to be vaccinated.

Around 75% of all Mercy employees are fully vaccinated across its US hospitals, according to Hubbard.

“Mandating the vaccine is the right thing to do,” says Dr. Robin Trotman, who stresses the importance of protecting the community.

Mercy just announced September 30th all @MercySGF workers will be required to be vaccinated. @kytv pic.twitter.com/4wt81EDMoZ

Mercy Springfield is treating 122 COVID-19 patients as of July 6, according to Mercy CAO Erik Frederick. Around 97% of those patients are not vaccinated, according to Hubbard. The hospital has reported three new COVID-19 deaths over the past 24 hours.

Mercy Springfield announced earlier this week it was running short on ventilators. The hospital had been using around 50 ventilators, but needed to request more from surrounding Mercy hospital sites, including Northwest Arkansas and St. Louis.

The hospital also announced it is putting together a physicians advocacy group to talk and educate workers who are hesitant about getting the vaccine.

With rising numbers, others changes could also be seen across Mercy hospitals, including a cap on elective surgeries. Health leaders will be monitoring surges and bed availability over the next few weeks.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com

Read full article at KY3

COVID-19 surge response team begins to arrive in Missouri

KSHB 31 December, 1969 - 06:00pm

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Members of a federal COVID-19 surge response team have started to arrive in Missouri.

The first person landed in Springfield on Tuesday, according to Lisa Cox, a Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services spokesperson.

“We are looking forward to collaborating with them and learning more about how the Delta variant is impacting Missouri, specifically southwest Missouri initially,” Cox told 41 Action News via email. “More team members will be added, both remotely and in person, to assist with data and research, vaccine uptake strategies and outreach.”

News 4 Evening Update: July 7, 2021

KMOV St. Louis 07 July, 2021 - 06:18pm

Mercy requiring workers to get COVID-19 vaccine

FOX 2 St. Louis 07 July, 2021 - 06:18pm

Mercy becomes the latest St. Louis health care system to mandate COVID-19 vaccinations

STLtoday.com 07 July, 2021 - 06:18pm

RN Jen Ryder administers a COVID-19 vaccination to Anesthesiologist Don Arnold on Monday, Dec. 14, 2020, at Mercy Hospital St. Louis. Mercy St Louis was hoping to vaccinate about 72 frontline staff who work directly with COVID-19 patients – nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists, housekeeping. Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS — Mercy Health on Wednesday directed of all its employees to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Sept. 30, becoming the fourth major St. Louis area hospital system to require staff to get the shots.  

The move comes as Missouri hospital and public health officials are doing all they can to encourage vaccination as the best tool to fight the more infectious and dangerous delta variant of the coronavirus.

Low vaccination rates coupled with the variant have been blamed for a surge of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations across Missouri, including an increase in patients younger than 18 at one hospital in southwest Missouri — the area of the state hit hardest.

Mercy has hospitals and clinics across southwest Missouri, including Joplin and Springfield, as well as in the St. Louis area. The health system also serves communities in Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Arkansas and Missouri lead the United States in the rate of new coronavirus cases.

Dr. William Sistrunk, Mercy infectious disease specialist, said the vaccine requirement is essential in protecting the health of employees and patients.

“As health care leaders in our communities, it is important we set the standard to prevent the spread of COVID-19,” Sistrunk said. “Our goal is to ensure the safest possible work environment for our co-workers and patients while also being a part of the effort to stop the spread of the virus in the communities we serve.”

Officials with the Chesterfield-based health care system say they are joining more than 20 other hospital chains across the U.S. that have made the vaccine mandatory.

Both Pfizer and Moderna have applied to the Food and Drug Administration for full approval of their COVID-19 vaccines, which is expected soon, hospital officials said. COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to be safe and effective with more than 171 million Americans already vaccinated under emergency use authorization.

As other hospitals have reported, the majority of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at Mercy hospitals have not been vaccinated.

“More than 95% of recent hospitalizations across the U.S. are people who aren’t vaccinated. The data is clear. Vaccination is key to saving lives,” said Dr. John Mohart, Mercy’s senior vice president of clinical services.

Officials with CoxHealth were asked about the vaccination rate among employees during a news conference held Tuesday to discuss the delta variant’s impact on patient loads and staffing needs.

CoxHealth is based in Springfield and operates six hospitals and several clinics across hard-hit southwest Missouri.

About 62.5% of CoxHealth staff — or 7,000 employees — are vaccinated, officials said. Since the rollout of the vaccines, none of those who got the shots have been admitted to the hospital with COVID-19.

“That’s a pretty strong case to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Nana Gaisie, medical director of employee health for CoxHealth.

The rates among employees vary according to education levels, officials said. About 92% of physicians are vaccinated, while rates are as low as 40% among jobs requiring only a high school diploma.

Across Springfield’s Greene County, just 38% of residents have initiated vaccination, state data shows. Most of the surrounding counties are below 30%.

CoxHealth has recently seen more children hospitalized with COVID-19, said Dr. Kofi Asare-Bawuah, the health system’s pediatrics medical director.

Since June 21, the health system has cared for nine pediatric COVID-19 patients, when previously the system would see two to four a month, Asare-Bawuah said. The youngest was just over a week old, and the oldest was 18.

“The ones admitted are sicker than those we had previously admitted,” the doctor said. They needed more help with getting enough oxygen.

Boone County has the highest vaccination rate in Missouri but it joins a list of Missouri jurisdictions recommending residents wear masks indoors no matter their vaccination status.

“It’s important that community members do everything possible to protect themselves and each other, regardless of vaccination status. It is especially important to help protect those who cannot get vaccinated, specifically children under the age of 12,” read the public health advisory issued Wednesday by Columbia-Boone County Public Health and Human Services.

Health officials in Jefferson, St. Louis and St. Louis County issued a similar advisory six days ago as area cases and hospitalizations show upward trends.

In Boone County, nearly 51% of residents have initiated vaccination, but it still falls short of the 70% estimated to achieve herd immunity and slow the spread of virus.

“Talk to your friends and family about the importance of getting the vaccine,” the advisory stated. “For parents of children younger than 12 who can’t be vaccinated, the best way to protect your child is to make sure the adults around them are vaccinated.”

BJC HealthCare and Washington University on June 15 were the first major institutions in the St. Louis region to announce COVID-19 vaccine requirements, setting a Sept. 15 deadline for employees.

St. Luke’s Hospital made a similar announcement on June 25, with an Aug. 13 deadline. SSM Health came next on June 28, with employees having to be fully vaccinated by the end of September.

You're not alone in your parenting struggles. Subscribe for unlimited access to the Post-Dispatch for less than the cost of getting a sitter on a Friday night.

Sign up here to get the latest health & fitness updates in your inbox every week!

Michele Munz is a health reporter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

RN Jen Ryder administers a COVID-19 vaccination to Anesthesiologist Don Arnold on Monday, Dec. 14, 2020, at Mercy Hospital St. Louis. Mercy St Louis was hoping to vaccinate about 72 frontline staff who work directly with COVID-19 patients – nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists, housekeeping. Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Mercy to require all employees to be vaccinated

WDAF FOX4 Kansas City 07 July, 2021 - 12:16pm

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – Mercy will require all current and future employees to be fully vaccinated. The hospital has set Thursday, September 30, 2021, for the complete vaccination date for employees.

Mercy has updated this requirement as the Delta variant continues to spread rapidly across the region. Mercy hospital and clinics have branches in Joplin, Springfield, St. Louis, and other locations. Mercy serves communities in Arkansas and Oklahoma where the number of Delta variant cases are increasing.

“What we are seeing aligns with the Associated Press analysis of CDC data,” said Dr. John Mohart, Mercy’s senior vice president of clinical services. “More than 95% of recent hospitalizations across the U.S. are people who aren’t vaccinated. The data is clear. Vaccination is key to saving lives.”

In Springfield, there are 120 COVID-19 positive patients. There are 27 patients in the ICU: 23 of those patients are on a ventilator, and three deaths in the last 24 hours.

“This is really to protect our co-workers, it’s an investment in our co-workers, an investment in our patients to ensure we are providing the very best protection,” said Brent Hubbard, the CEO of Mercy. “As a healthcare provider, we should expect that of ourselves.”

Across the Mercy network, there are 40,000 employees. The Mercy staff with vaccination is at 75%, and 25% are not vaccinated.

“It is essential that we take these steps in order to protect the health of our co-workers and our patients at Mercy,” said Dr. William Sistrunk, Mercy infectious disease specialist. “As health care leaders in our communities, it is important we set the standard to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Vaccination is our best defense against the virus and already has provided many of our co-workers with the protection they need to care for our patients. Our goal is to ensure the safest possible work environment for our co-workers and patients while also being a part of the effort to stop the spread of the virus in the communities we serve.”

Hubbard said there will be exceptions for people with medical and religious reasons, but those who otherwise refuse could face termination by October.

“It’s very similar to our flu vaccination policy,” said Hubbard.

Doctor Sistrunk said it’s rare to have a fully vaccinated patient, but their health seems to be better when someone is completely vaccinated.

“We’re seeing generally those patients have a milder illness, generally they have not required ICU stays, and have been able to go home quicker,” said Sistrunk.

You can watch the press briefing below.

CoxHealth responded to the Mercy announcement Wednesday saying at this time they will not be requiring COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of employment.

“COVID-19 vaccines have proven to be highly efficacious and safe, can save lives, and end this pandemic. We strongly advocate for their use. However, we understand that many in our community are hesitant to become vaccinated, including some employees.”

Paula F. Baker, Freeman Health System President and Chief Executive Officer, responds to the announcements early today saying Freeman is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation in their facilities and the community, but currently will not issue a policy mandating the vaccine for employees.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

WAMEGO, Kan. -- A young man touched hearts during his trip to see the Kansas City Chiefs play in Super Bowl LV in Tampa. He made headlines after former Chiefs player Anthony Sherman gifted him the tickets.

Sadly, this past week, cancer took the 22-year-old's life.

The council began discussions on decriminalization in January. After the meeting on May 3 the council directed city staff to collect additional information on the legality of decriminalizing the possession of marijuana.

Anita Singh, 22, was last seen around 4 p.m. Wednesday near Northwest 62nd Street and North Harden Court.

Mercy Health System gives workers vaccination deadline

4029tv 07 July, 2021 - 12:03pm

Sign up for daily emails with local updates and other important news.

All Mercy Health System workers will be required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by the end of September, according to a press release.

"The majority of Mercy patients recently hospitalized with COVID-19 have not been vaccinated," according to the news release.

Mercy is a health system with dozens of acute care and specialty hospitals as well as over 700 physician and outpatient clinics in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas, according to its website.

It has 44,000 employees. The administration says that their vaccination rate is at 75%, and 25% are not vaccinated.

“As health care leaders in our communities, it is important we set the standard to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Vaccination is our best defense against the virus and already has provided many of our co-workers with the protection they need to care for our patients," according to the news release.

Here locally, representatives from Mercy hospitals wanted to talk on camera.

Today, a news conference was held in Springfield with their Mercy president.

Brent Hubbard with Mercy hospitals in Springfield said they are now mandating the vaccine because it has proven to be safe and effective.

Hubbard also noting today that flu vaccinations have been required for Mercy for the past seven-plus years.

Today, Hubbard was asked what disciplinary action could take place for those who do not get the vaccine.

He said they could suspend those workers, but they would like to avoid that as Mercy will work with co-workers to develop a plan to get vaccinated by the scheduled deadline.

“So, we have a short window to act, we have an obligation as a healthcare system to protect the health of our communities. We have been strong advocates of the vaccine so we are leading by example,” Brent Hubbard, president for Mercy Springfield said.

40/29 News did speak with several Mercy staff today who wanted to stay anonymous, but they said this decision now puts their job on the line and they are upset about this mandate.

Hutchinson blamed the delta variant and a low state vaccine rate.

Only one of Arkansas's 75 counties met the governor's vaccination goal of having 50% or more of the population vaccinated. All but Bradley County missed the mark.

Hearst Television participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which means we may get paid commissions on purchases made through our links to retailer sites.

As New York salutes health care workers, Missouri fights a surge

WPIX 11 New York 07 July, 2021 - 11:52am

Grand marshal Sandra Lindsay, a health care worker who was the first person in the country to get a COVID-19 vaccine shot, waves to spectators as she leads marchers through the Financial District as confetti falls during a parade honoring essential workers for their efforts in getting New York City through the COVID-19 pandemic, Wednesday, July 7, 2021, in New York. The parade kicked off at Battery Park and travel up Broadway in lower Manhattan, the iconic stretch known as the Canyon of Heroes, which has hosted parades honoring world leaders, celebrities and winning sports teams. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

LOWER MANHATTAN, N.Y. — New York held a ticker-tape parade Wednesday for the health care and other essential workers who helped the city pull through the darkest days of the COVID-19 pandemic, while authorities in Missouri struggled to beat back a surge blamed on the fast-spreading delta variant and deep resistance to getting vaccinated.

The split-screen images could be a glimpse of what public health experts say may lie ahead for the U.S. even as the economy opens up again and life gets back to something close to normal: outbreaks in corners of the country with low vaccination rates.

“We’ve got a lot to appreciate, because we’re well underway in our recovery,” declared New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who rode on a parade float with hospital employees through the Canyon of Heroes, the skyscraper-lined stretch of Broadway where astronauts, returning soldiers and championship teams are feted.

In Missouri, meanwhile, the Springfield area has been hit so hard that one hospital had to borrow ventilators over the Fourth of July weekend and begged on social media for help from respiratory therapists, several of whom volunteered from other states. Members of a new federal “surge response team” also began arriving to help suppress the outbreak.

Missouri not only leads the nation in new cases relative to the population, it is also averaging 1,000 cases per day — about the same number as the entire Northeast, including the big cities in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.

California, with 40 million people, is posting only slightly higher case numbers than Missouri, which has a population of 6 million.

Northeastern states have seen cases, deaths and hospitalizations plummet to almost nothing amid widespread acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Vermont has gone 26 days with new case numbers in single digits. In Maryland, the governor’s office said every death recorded in June was in an unvaccinated person. New York City, which was the lethal epicenter of the U.S. outbreak in the spring of 2020, when the number of dead peaked at over 800 a day, regularly goes entire days with no reported deaths.

The problem in Missouri, as health experts see it: Just 45% of the state’s residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, compared with 55% of the U.S. population. Some rural counties near Springfield have vaccination rates in the teens and 20s.

At the same time, the delta variant is fast becoming the predominant strain in the state. Testing of wastewatershows it is spreading from rural areas into more populated places.

Mercy Hospital Springfield reported Tuesday that it had more than 120 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 — the highest total since the pandemic began. Seventeen people died in the latest two-week reporting period in the county that surrounds Springfield, the most since January. None were vaccinated, authorities said.

Erik Frederick, Mercy’s chief administrative officer, said staff members are frustrated knowing that “this is preventable this time” because of the vaccine.

“We try to convince people, but it is almost like you are talking a different language,” he lamented. “There is no way they are going to get a vaccine. Their personal freedom is more important.”

The Mercy system announced Wednesday that it is requiring vaccinations among staff at the hospital in Springfield, as well as at its 29 other hospitals and 900 or so clinics in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Arkansas. It said about 75% of its more than 40,000 employees are vaccinated.

Missouri also never had a statewide mask mandate. The sentiment against government intervention is so strong that Brian Steele, mayor of the Springfield suburb of Nixa, is facing a recall vote after imposing a mask rule, even though it has long since expired.

At Springfield’s other hospital, Cox South, several patients are in their 20s and 30s, said Ashley Kimberling Casad, vice president of clinical services. She said she had been hopeful when she eyed the COVID-19 numbers in May as she prepared to return from maternity leave.

“I really thought when I came back from maternity leave that, not that COVID would be gone, but that it would just be so manageable. Then all of a sudden it started spiking,” she said, adding that nearly all the virus samples that the hospital is sending for testing are proving to be the delta variant.

Citing the rise in cases, the Springfield school district reinstated its mask requirement for its summer program starting Wednesday.

The contrasting scenes in the U.S. came as the worldwide death toll from COVID-19 closed in on 4 million, by Johns Hopkins University’s count. COVID-19 deaths nationwide are down to around 200 per day from a peak of over 3,400 per day in January.

In New York, those honored at the parade included nurses and doctors, emergency crews, bus drivers and train operators, teachers and utility workers. The crowds along the route were thin, in part because many businesses are still operating remotely.

“What a difference a year makes,” said parade grand marshal Sandra Lindsay, a nurse who was the first person in the country to get a COVID-19 vaccine shot.

“Fifteen months ago, we were in a much different place, but thanks to the heroic efforts of so many — health care workers, first responders, front-line workers, the people who fed us, the people who put their lives on the line, we can’t thank them enough.”

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

LOWER MANHATTAN --- The Canyon of Heroes, the stretch of lower Broadway from the Battery to City Hall, was full of heroes of the pandemic on Wednesday, as the city thanked essential workers for helping to bring New York out of the worst of the pandemic.

From sanitation workers, to public transit employees, a wide variety of New Yorkers were represented in the ticker tape parade. Some 260 different groups of essential workers marched or rode on 14 different floats in the parade that lasted from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Adams met a group of young people as he campaigned and made the piercing promise to them, he said on Twitter.

Now, a nonprofit called Literacy Inc. is helping build multi-cultural libraries in two NYCHA community centers and are creating more libraries city-wide.

As New York salutes health workers, Missouri fights a surge

Yahoo News 07 July, 2021 - 11:52am

The split-screen images could be a glimpse of what public health experts say may lie ahead for the U.S. even as life gets back to something close to normal: outbreaks in corners of the country with low vaccination rates.

“We’ve got a lot to appreciate, because we’re well underway in our recovery," declared New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, who rode on a parade float with hospital employees down the Canyon of Heroes, the skyscraper-lined stretch of Broadway where astronauts, returning soldiers and championship teams are feted.

In Missouri, meanwhile, the Springfield area has been hit so hard that one hospital had to borrow ventilators over the Fourth of July weekend and begged on social media for help from respiratory therapists, several of whom volunteered from other states. Members of a new federal “surge response team” also began arriving to help suppress the outbreak.

Missouri not only leads the nation in new cases relative to the population, it is also averaging 1,000 cases per day — about the same number as the entire Northeast, including the big cities in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts.

California, with 40 million people, is posting only slightly higher case numbers than Missouri, which has a population of 6 million.

Northeastern states have seen cases, deaths and hospitalizations plummet to almost nothing amid widespread acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Vermont has gone 26 days with new case numbers in single digits. In Maryland, the governor’s office said every death recorded in June was in an unvaccinated person. New York City, which was the lethal epicenter of the U.S. outbreak in the spring of 2020, when the number of dead peaked at over 800 a day, regularly goes entire days with no reported deaths.

The problem in Missouri, as health experts see it: Just 45% of the state's residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, compared with 55% of the U.S. population. Some rural counties near Springfield have vaccination rates in the teens and 20s.

At the same time, the delta variant is fast becoming the predominant version of the virus in Missouri.

Epidemiologists say the country should expect more COVID-19 outbreaks in areas with low vaccination rates over the next several months.

“I’m afraid that that is very predictable,” said Dr. Chris Beyrer, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins University. “If politician seize on this and say, ‘Who could have predicted this?,’ the answer is every licensed epidemiologist in the country.”

Republican Gov. Mike Parson said Wednesday that his administration has done “everything possible” to fend off outbreaks.

“Right now, the vaccine’s out there,” he said. “I mean, people walk past it every day, whether they’re in a pharmacy, whether they’re in a Walmart, whether they’re in a health center.”

Mercy Hospital Springfield reported Tuesday that it had more than 120 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 — the highest total since the pandemic began. Seventeen people died in the latest two-week reporting period in the county that surrounds Springfield, the most since January. None were vaccinated, authorities said.

Erik Frederick, Mercy's chief administrative officer, said staff members are frustrated knowing that “this is preventable this time” because of the vaccine.

“We try to convince people, but it is almost like you are talking a different language," he lamented. “There is no way they are going to get a vaccine. Their personal freedom is more important."

The Mercy system announced Wednesday it is requiring vaccinations among staff at the hospital in Springfield, as well as at its hundreds of other hospitals and clinics in Missouri and neighboring states. It said about 75% of its more than 40,000 employees are vaccinated.

Missouri also never had a statewide mask mandate. The sentiment against government intervention is so strong that Brian Steele, mayor of the Springfield suburb of Nixa, is facing a recall vote after imposing a mask rule, even though it has long since expired.

At Springfield's other hospital, Cox South, several patients are in their 20s and 30s, said Ashley Kimberling Casad, vice president of clinical services. She said she had been hopeful when she eyed the COVID-19 numbers in May as she prepared to return from maternity leave.

“I really thought when I came back from maternity leave that, not that COVID would be gone, but that it would just be so manageable. Then all of a sudden it started spiking," she said, adding that nearly all the virus samples that the hospital is sending for testing are proving to be the delta variant.

Citing the rise in cases, the Springfield school district reinstated its mask requirement for its summer program starting Wednesday.

The contrasting scenes in the U.S. came as the worldwide death toll from COVID-19 closed in on 4 million, by Johns Hopkins University's count. COVID-19 deaths nationwide are down to around 200 per day from a peak of over 3,400 per day in January.

In New York, those honored at the parade included nurses and doctors, emergency crews, bus drivers and train operators, teachers and utility workers. The crowds along the route were thin, in part because many businesses are still operating remotely.

“What a difference a year makes,” said parade grand marshal Sandra Lindsay, a nurse who was the first person in the country to get a COVID-19 vaccine shot.

“Fifteen months ago, we were in a much different place, but thanks to the heroic efforts of so many — health care workers, first responders, front-line workers, the people who fed us, the people who put their lives on the line, we can’t thank them enough."

Tom Murphy contributed to this report from Indianapolis.

Swarms of synchronous fireflies are rather like melting ice, or at least that’s how Rafael Sarfati, a physicist, sees it. Ice remains solid until it warms to a certain temperature and becomes a liquid. Likewise, a loose swarm fireflies will flash the lanterns in their abdomens randomly. But when the swarm reaches a certain density, the fireflies begin to blink in unison. “Above that threshold, it is almost perfect synchronization,” with rhythmic, coordinated waves of light, said Sarfati, a postd

"Last night, dad passed peacefully in his sleep after years of enduring the ravages of Parkinson’s," Downey Jr. wrote. He "remained remarkably optimistic throughout."

Ride-hailing services like Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash have had trouble finding workers recently; one industry expert says that it's their own fault.

Those who have received the Sinovac vaccine locally as well as returning Singapore residents who have received a vaccine overseas different from the two under the national vaccination drive would be allowed to receive two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.

Greene recently apologized for comparing mask mandates at the U.S. Capitol to the Holocaust.

Derek Carr reached out to Carl Nassib and told him, "I love you and I got your back no matter what."

The Dodgers have decided they will not give out a Bauer bobblehead on Aug. 19.

A Virginia man charged with joining the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol told an undercover FBI agent that he belonged to a militia-style group and coordinated "surveillance efforts" on the same building more than a month after the riot, according to a court filing unsealed on Tuesday. The filing, which accompanied a criminal complaint against Fi Duong, doesn't specify why he and an associate wanted to surveil the Capitol for weeks after the Jan. 6 insurrection. “How do we feel about an Intel run around the Capitol tonight?" an unnamed associate asked Duong during a Feb. 13 exchange on the encrypted messaging platform.

A lawsuit in Ohio is the latest in the growing movement against some of the 26 states that opted out of the federal unemployment programs earlier than the federal expiration.

Make sore, achy muscles a thing of the past.

Frustrated by his inability to use social media, former President Donald Trump turned to a tactic he has often used as a way to amplify his voice in the public square: specious lawsuits.

Henderson and two other ex-Sooners allegedly robbed a man earlier this year. All three have now been dismissed from the team.

"It does stink. I don't think there's a better definition of it."

On one of the hottest days of the summer, Joey Reed stood alone outside of the White House, holding a sign with a picture of his son that said in bold type: "Free Trevor Reed." The plea was written next to images of his son in uniform, including two taken of him with former President Barack Obama. U.S. officials said the Marine veteran, has been held for nearly two years in Russia on charges that U.S. officials said were fabricated in an effort to use him as bargaining chips in a potential prisoner swap between the two countries.

"It’s one thing to talk about the principles around diversity and inclusion. It’s something else when it comes to somebody’s specific job."

Three of the four Ogwumike sisters were named to Nigeria's 15-person provisional Olympic roster this week. But will Nneka be allowed to play?

Emergency workers gave up Wednesday on any hope of finding survivors in a collapsed Florida condo building, telling sobbing families that there was “no chance of life” in the rubble as crews shifted their efforts to recovering more remains. The announcement followed increasingly somber reports from emergency officials, who said they sought to prepare families for the worst. “At this point, we have truly exhausted every option available to us in the search-and-rescue mission,” Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said at a news conference.

Latifa bint Mohammed al-Maktoum's escape plan was dashed in 2018, but how her father found her was a mystery. USA TODAY finds the FBI helped.

The continued spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19 has put vaccination rates in the U.S. under the microscope.

Former president Donald Trump claims Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube are violating the First Amendment.

Health Stories