Micah Hyde: When I left Green Bay, Aaron Rodgers told me how frustrated he was

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NBC Sports 30 July, 2021 - 03:16am 36 views

What did the Packers give up for Cobb?

A source told ESPN that the Packers only had to give up a sixth-round pick and got the Texans to eat $3 million of Cobb's salary; the cap hit on the Packers will be slightly under $3 million. ESPNGreen Bay Packers complete deal with Houston Texans for Randall Cobb

Is Aaron Rodgers still with the Packers?

After two seasons away from the Packers, Rodgers has one of his favorite wide receivers back for 2021. The Packers drafted Cobb in 2011 and he spent eight productive seasons (470 receptions, 5,524 yards and 41 touchdowns) in Green Bay and now he's returning to the delight of Rodgers. USA TODAYNine takeaways from Aaron Rodgers' candid comments on Green Bay Packers

How old is Randall Cobb?

Cobb is still just 30 years old. The 5-foot-10, 192-pound receiver was the first player born in the 1990s to be drafted into the NFL when the Packers selected him in 2011. Cobb, who was just 20 at the start of his NFL career, caught 470 passes for 5,524 yards and 41 touchdowns in 105 regular-season games in Green Bay. Packers.com5 things to know about Randall Cobb - Packers.com - Packers.com

Is Cobb coming back to the Packers?

After days of expectation, Randall Cobb is indeed on his way back to Green Bay. The Packers are sending a 2022 sixth-round draft pick to the Houston Texans to bring back Cobb, reuniting him with Aaron Rodgers and the team for which he starred for eight seasons, NFL Network's Tom Pelissero reported Wednesday afternoon. NFL.comPackers acquire WR Randall Cobb from Texans for sixth-round pick

Aaron Rodgers signs reworked deal with Green Bay Packers, sources say

ESPN 30 July, 2021 - 06:00am

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GREEN BAY, Wis. -- It's now in writing that Aaron Rodgers will have a much easier time leaving the Green Bay Packers after this season, if he so chooses.

Rodgers on Thursday signed his reworked deal, sources told ESPN's Adam Schefter.

Among the concessions in the new contract:

• The 2023 year in his original contract is voided, making 2022 the final year on his contract.

• Forfeiture provisions were removed from the contract, preventing the Packers from pursuing prorated portions of Rodgers' signing bonus.

That means Rodgers would not lose any of the signing bonus or roster bonus money he received this year (totaling more than $14 million), and after the 2021 season, the remaining $5.7 million in proration from his 2019 signing bonus also is no longer forfeitable.

No other financial changes were believed to have been made to the deal.

Rodgers reported to training camp on Tuesday and participated when practice opened Wednesday, all while progress was made on his contract. On Wednesday, Rodgers admitted he considered retirement and detailed his offseason-long standoff with the Packers. He also said he still isn't sure what -- if anything -- will change.

He also said he was baffled why the Packers didn't approach him about a new contract shortly after his MVP season that would not only reward him but help the team's salary-cap situation.

"I think there's ways of doing that through signing bonuses and stuff that can lessen the load, for sure," Rodgers said Wednesday. "But there wasn't a commitment past 2021. There was conversation about, that I know you guys were all talking about, about moving salary around through a restructure to open up some-cap space, for sure. Obviously, with the salary cap going down from the 190s to $182 million, I think everybody's contract who had a contract basically got restructured in some way.

"It was more just the approach to not mention anything past 2021 made me feel like I wasn't in the future plans, which, again, I get it, it's a business and I'm not a victim here. I've made a ton of money here and I've been really fortunate to play a long time and to play here. At the same time, I'm still competitive and I still feel like I can play. I proved it last year, so I feel like making a commitment past the 2021 season was not a big deal and there are ways to do that. That wasn't necessarily accomplished, and so that's why we're here."

Rodgers also said he did not want to be a lame-duck quarterback, but this in effect sets it up that way.

"That's a hard one for me because I never looked at it like that," Packers general manager Brian Gutekunst said before this deal was completed. "Obviously, at the moment, he's got three years left on his contract, so we certainly don't look at it as a lame duck. We may alter that, but even at that stage, it's not going to be a one-year contract. Never looked at it like that. As you guys know, in this business, everything's year to year. I never looked at it as a lame-duck situation with any player."

The reworked deal also did not appear to address any specific role or involvement that Rodgers would have in things like personnel decisions, although the Packers already conceded and traded for receiver Randall Cobb -- at Rodgers' request.

Although team president Mark Murphy has said the Packers are committed to Rodgers for "2021 and beyond," all anyone has talked about this week during the opening of training camp is this season.

"Kind of how we felt and what we wanted for this 2021 team never really changed," Gutekunst said this week.

"A lot of these issues [that Rodgers had with the team], obviously, we weren't aware of them until this year, this offseason, and once we were, we certainly wanted to work with him, and it's going to take both sides willing to do that to kind of work through them, and I think we're committed to doing that."

'The Green Bay Packers can't have a roster full of Aaron Rodgers' buddies' — Colin | NFL | THE HERD

The Herd with Colin Cowherd 30 July, 2021 - 06:00am

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GREEN BAY, Wis. -- It's now in writing that Aaron Rodgers will have a much easier time leaving the Green Bay Packers after this season, if he so chooses.

Rodgers on Thursday signed his reworked deal, sources told ESPN's Adam Schefter.

Among the concessions in the new contract:

• The 2023 year in his original contract is voided, making 2022 the final year on his contract.

• Forfeiture provisions were removed from the contract, preventing the Packers from pursuing prorated portions of Rodgers' signing bonus.

That means Rodgers would not lose any of the signing bonus or roster bonus money he received this year (totaling more than $14 million), and after the 2021 season, the remaining $5.7 million in proration from his 2019 signing bonus also is no longer forfeitable.

No other financial changes were believed to have been made to the deal.

Rodgers reported to training camp on Tuesday and participated when practice opened Wednesday, all while progress was made on his contract. On Wednesday, Rodgers admitted he considered retirement and detailed his offseason-long standoff with the Packers. He also said he still isn't sure what -- if anything -- will change.

He also said he was baffled why the Packers didn't approach him about a new contract shortly after his MVP season that would not only reward him but help the team's salary-cap situation.

"I think there's ways of doing that through signing bonuses and stuff that can lessen the load, for sure," Rodgers said Wednesday. "But there wasn't a commitment past 2021. There was conversation about, that I know you guys were all talking about, about moving salary around through a restructure to open up some-cap space, for sure. Obviously, with the salary cap going down from the 190s to $182 million, I think everybody's contract who had a contract basically got restructured in some way.

"It was more just the approach to not mention anything past 2021 made me feel like I wasn't in the future plans, which, again, I get it, it's a business and I'm not a victim here. I've made a ton of money here and I've been really fortunate to play a long time and to play here. At the same time, I'm still competitive and I still feel like I can play. I proved it last year, so I feel like making a commitment past the 2021 season was not a big deal and there are ways to do that. That wasn't necessarily accomplished, and so that's why we're here."

Rodgers also said he did not want to be a lame-duck quarterback, but this in effect sets it up that way.

"That's a hard one for me because I never looked at it like that," Packers general manager Brian Gutekunst said before this deal was completed. "Obviously, at the moment, he's got three years left on his contract, so we certainly don't look at it as a lame duck. We may alter that, but even at that stage, it's not going to be a one-year contract. Never looked at it like that. As you guys know, in this business, everything's year to year. I never looked at it as a lame-duck situation with any player."

The reworked deal also did not appear to address any specific role or involvement that Rodgers would have in things like personnel decisions, although the Packers already conceded and traded for receiver Randall Cobb -- at Rodgers' request.

Although team president Mark Murphy has said the Packers are committed to Rodgers for "2021 and beyond," all anyone has talked about this week during the opening of training camp is this season.

"Kind of how we felt and what we wanted for this 2021 team never really changed," Gutekunst said this week.

"A lot of these issues [that Rodgers had with the team], obviously, we weren't aware of them until this year, this offseason, and once we were, we certainly wanted to work with him, and it's going to take both sides willing to do that to kind of work through them, and I think we're committed to doing that."

Couch: In his Packers feud, Aaron Rodgers channeled LeBron James and Tom Brady — and won nothing

TheBlaze 30 July, 2021 - 06:00am

He talked to reporters for 30 minutes, and just like that, the media declared him the winner of his standoff with the Green Bay Packers.

Rodgers spent the off-season in a temper tantrum, angry about so many things. He didn't want to play for the Packers any more and was going to hold his breath until he got his way.

Final details of his newly amended contract haven't been released. It appears that Packers management gave up nothing that it wanted.

Brady brought with him his longtime New England teammate tight end Rob Gronkowski, along with receiver Antonio Brown. They would combine to score three touchdowns in the Super Bowl.

If you can't build it, buy it.

To make that sort of demand is to declare: We're in charge here. And maybe that works for superstars in the NBA; it didn't work out in the NFL.

Practices are starting, and Rodgers is still with the Packers, Russell Wilson still in Seattle, Deshaun Watson still in Houston. Matt Stafford left Detroit for the Los Angeles Rams, but that was by mutual agreement. Even the Lions figured that Stafford had served his sentence with the franchise and deserved to be cut free.

So what happened? Well, no matter how big a star attraction the NFL quarterback is, the owner still has all the money, and the organization has all the power.

What happened to the great quarterback carousel that was supposed to happen? Twenty starting quarterbacks were supposed to move. Remember? Instead, it was all about Andy Dalton, Carson Wentz, and Teddy Bridgewater.

Rodgers was the biggest loser of the A-listers who wanted a trade. He returned and made it sound as if the Packers had made him concessions. The big one was that he wanted to be at the table for personnel decisions that affect his ability at quarterback.

"I think we can all understand Green Bay isn't a huge vacation destination," Rodgers said. "People come here to play with me, to play with our team and knowing that they can win a championship here. And the fact I haven't been used in those discussions was one I wanted to change moving forward."

Then Rodgers admitted he wasn't sure the Packers had made that concession to include him in the discussions at all.

It's also not easy to convince free agents to come play with you when you make it appear that your return is a one-year thing.

The Packers did trade to re-acquire receiver Randall Cobb from Houston. Cobb was a Rodgers favorite, and reports were that Rodgers demanded that move.

They still have Jordan Love at backup QB, too. Love was a sore point for Rodgers when the Packers surprisingly picked him out of Utah State in the first round of the 2020 draft.

Rodgers wanted another receiver or lineman, and the Packers took his eventual replacement instead.

Rodgers huffed, not only because of the pick but also because Packers management hadn't consulted him on it.

So he said at the time that he felt like a lame-duck quarterback and complained that the Packers wouldn't commit to him past 2021. His contract runs through 2023, but the guaranteed money stops after 2021.

Several reports say that the Packers agreed to drop the 2023 season from Rodgers' contract if he came back. So if he isn't happy after this season, then they'll explore a trade.

These are minor concessions. Rodgers was upset that the Packers wouldn't commit to him for the long term and then convinced the Packers to cut his contract short, as he moves into his 40s.

The truth is, Rodgers had no leverage. He was still under contract, and if he had retired, then he would've owed the Packers at least $23 million that he'd been paid in his signing bonus. He could have sat out at a cost of $50,000 a day.

He demanded a trade and the Packers refused.

So it's hard to see what Rodgers got out of this. He did humiliate Packers management a little, making them squirm and come to him and kiss his ring.

It was all a show for Packers management. He was showing them who's boss.

40 photos from Packers' first practice of training camp in 2021

Packers Wire 29 July, 2021 - 03:29am

The Green Bay Packers held their first training camp practice of the 2021 season on Wednesday, July 28 at Ray Nitschke Field next to Lambeau Field.

Here are some of the best photos:

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Nfl Green Bay Packers Training Camp

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