Microsoft Office is getting a new design and a native 64-bit Arm version for Windows 11

Technology

The Verge 28 June, 2021 - 05:52pm 49 views

How do I get Windows 11?

Most users will go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and clicking Check for Updates. If available, you'll see Feature update to Windows 11. Click Download and install. CNETWindows 11: Price, compatibility, release date and features for Microsoft's big new update

How to check if you can run Windows 11?

computer find out if your computer has a tpm. let's open the tpm. management tool go to the search box in the lower left and type tpm.msc select it if you get an overview. along with tpm manufacturer. information your computer does have a tpm chip just make sure here on the right it's version two version one will not ... TechGumboHow to Check If Your Windows 10 PC Can Run Windows 11

Does Windows 11 require TPM?

Windows 11 will only run on PCs that have a Trusted Platform Module (TPM), which are chips built into the PC in order to protect sensitive data, like encryption keys. LivemintWhy Windows 11 requires TPM chips

When will Windows 11 roll out?

However, active and eligible devices will receive the Windows 11 upgrade "through the first half" of 2022. Windows 11 is due out later in 2021 and will be delivered over several months. The rollout of the upgrade to Windows 10 devices already in use today will begin in 2022 through the first half of that year. IGNWindows 11 Free Upgrades Won't Arrive Until Next Year - IGN

Winners and Losers: Microsoft unveils Windows 11 while EE and O2 cut free roaming

TrustedReviews 28 June, 2021 - 07:03pm

With Amazon’s annual summer sale gone for another year, our focus turned to what Microsoft had to offer as the tech giant officially unveiled Windows 11 – and Microsoft weren’t shy on sharing what’s coming to its new OS.

Meanwhile, we had bad news from two of the UK biggest mobile networks as EE and O2 announced roaming charges will make an unwelcome comeback in 2022. 

This week’s winner is Microsoft, who gave PC users plenty to get excited about when it unveiled the latest iteration of its Windows operating system. 

Microsoft is giving Windows a design makeover with Windows 11, adding more curves and shifting the toolbar front and centre, a move that’s drawn comparisons to Apple’s macOS (even if it’s still missing out on one major Apple feature). 

Windows users are getting a personalised feed with widgets for things like the weather or your calendar, along with a Recommended app to make it easy to return to whichever app you were using last. 

Elsewhere, the interface for the Microsoft Store has been redesigned and new third-party apps will be able to join the store. Not only this, but Windows 11 will now support Android apps, so users can look forward to downloading through the Amazon App store (confusing, we know). 

Multi-tasking is improved thanks to the new Snap Layouts feature, while Microsoft Teams integration means you’ll be able to access the Chat feature and connect with friends and family directly from your PC’s toolbar. 

Gamers will enjoy the new Xbox Series X associated gaming features that includes DirectX 12 Ultimate and DirectStorage support, as well as Auto HDR for improved picture quality in select games. 

The operating system is also set to be faster than Windows 10 and improvements in efficiency mean Windows 11 laptops could offer better battery over their predecessors. Even better is that all of this will come as a free upgrade for eligible Windows 10 users. 

Windows 11 isn’t set to roll out until later in the year, but based on what we’ve seen, the new OS looks set to be a winner. 

EE and O2 – or rather, their customers – are clear contenders for the title of losers in this week’s edition. 

And it’s all thanks to Brexit (because of course it is). 

Both mobile networks confirmed roaming charges will make their dreaded return, meaning UK users can look forward to additional data costs next time they use their minutes, messages and data plans abroad. 

According to a BBC report, EE users who join after July 7 will be charged £2 a day to use their data allowance in 47 European locations from January 2022. 

Meanwhile, O2 has announced a return to roaming charges from August 2 onwards. The network is introducing a 25GB a month data cap in its Europe Zone before charging users £3.50 for every GB they run over.

This is all despite EE, O2, Three and Vodafone reassuring users they had no plans to reintroduce roaming charges. It seems those plans have changed. 

Roaming charges were scrapped in 2017, but the Brexit trade agreement made it possible for mobile networks to bring them back. Now it looks as though EE and O2 will take this option, and the saddest part is we can’t make the most of free roaming while we have it thanks to the pandemic. 2021 really is the worst. 

There are some exceptions to the new roaming policies. EE has confirmed it won’t charge customers extra to use their phones in the Republic of Ireland as it is included in domestic plans. Maybe book your next holiday to Dublin if you’re concerned about running up a bill while you’re away.

Editorial independence means being able to give an unbiased verdict about a product or company, with the avoidance of conflicts of interest. To ensure this is possible, every member of the editorial staff follows a clear code of conduct.

We also expect our journalists to follow clear ethical standards in their work. Our staff members must strive for honesty and accuracy in everything they do. We follow the IPSO Editors’ code of practice to underpin these standards.

Founded in 2004, Trusted Reviews exists to give our readers thorough, unbiased and independent advice on what to buy.

Today, we have 9 million users a month around the world, and assess more than 1,000 products a year.

Editorial independence means being able to give an unbiased verdict about a product or company, with the avoidance of conflicts of interest. To ensure this is possible, every member of the editorial staff follows a clear code of conduct.

We also expect our journalists to follow clear ethical standards in their work. Our staff members must strive for honesty and accuracy in everything they do. We follow the IPSO Editors’ code of practice to underpin these standards.

Products tested and reviewed since 2004

Microsoft won’t confirm exactly which CPUs work with Windows 11 — yet

The Verge 28 June, 2021 - 01:22pm

It’ll test support for Intel 7th Gen and AMD Zen 1 chips

Where things get confusing again is the news that its first Insider build of Windows 11, which is available today, won’t require TPM 2.0 or specific CPUs. Microsoft will use data from testers to inform potential adjustments to the minimum requirements. Microsoft will be paying extra attention to users with Intel 7th Gen CPUs and AMD Zen 1 CPUs to see if they’re getting the performance that Microsoft is looking for when it comes to reliability and security.

This news seems to confirm people’s fears that Windows 11 won’t support older CPUs, some of which can still keep up with the newer models on a pure performance basis. In the blog post, Microsoft claims that the reason Windows 11 won’t run on those CPUs is to maintain a higher level of security, stability, and reliability.

Microsoft will also be “temporarily removing” the PC Health Check App, which was designed to tell people running Windows 10 whether they’d be able to update their computers to Windows 11. The company says the app “was not fully prepared to share the level of detail or accuracy” that users expected, but it said the app would be available again for Windows 11’s launch in the fall (likely October).

Subscribe to get the best Verge-approved tech deals of the week.

Check your inbox for a welcome email.

Technology Stories