Naomi Osaka Speaking Japanese Videos: Does She Speak Japanese?

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STYLECASTER 16 July, 2021 - 05:13pm 4 views

Who is Naomi Osaka's boyfriend?

Naomi Osaka Nike Play Academy Osaka has been dating Cordae, a rapper previously known as YBN Cordae, for about two years. According to Osaka, he's been an essential part of her journey. While the couple is quite private, Osaka wrote a heartfelt message to Cordae after his show of support during the 2020 U.S. Open. oprahdaily.comWho Is Naomi Osaka's Boyfriend, Cordae? All About Their Relationship

July 16, 2021 | 4:52pm

Naomi Osaka nods to her larger-than-life tennis career on the cover of Hong Kong Tokyo’s July 2021 digital issue, clad in an appropriately athletic-themed outfit by David Koma.

In addition to a white bustier bodysuit and matching oversized mesh blouse, the 23-year-old sports a pair of sparkling oversized earrings shaped like tennis rackets, with her braided hair pulled back into a mohawk-like updo.

Osaka posed for the photoshoot ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, where she is set to represent Japan.

“Tennis is a solo sport, you cannot rely on a teammate when you’re having an off day. It’s about trusting yourself and the work you put in prior to the match,” she told Vogue Hong Kong.

Continued Osaka, “You may lose more than you win, be told ‘no’ more than ‘yes’. But if you stay the path and put in the work you can be the best version of [yourself].”

The two-time Grand Slam winner may be the world’s highest-paid female athlete, but she’s been open about her struggles with being in the public eye.

“It isn’t easy having so many eyeballs on you,” Osaka said. “Each with an opinion about who they think you are without knowing you first. I try to surround myself with people that know me best. At the end of the day, the only opinion that matters is your own and [that of] the people close to you.”

In June, Osaka withdrew from the French Open after refusing to participate in interviews, citing bouts with anxiety and depression. She will address her mental health battles in her Netflix documentary “Naomi Osaka,” which premieres on July 16.

“For so long I’ve tied winning to, like, my worth as a person,” she says in the limited series. “To anyone that would know me, they know me for being a tennis player. So what am I if I’m not a good tennis player?”

Read full article at STYLECASTER

Naomi Osaka is ‘terrified’ about the release of her new Netflix series: ‘This isn’t like a tennis match’

Yahoo Life 17 July, 2021 - 02:00pm

On Friday, the 23-year-old tennis star shared the movie poster of her new Netflix docuseries, Naomi Osaka. The three-part series, which was co-executive produced by LeBron James, showcases Osaka navigating her rise to fame following the 2018 U.S. Open when she was merely 20 years old. In a screenshot of a message typed in the Notes app, she admitted to being "terrified" of the documentary's release, particularly after her recently making headlines for pulling out of two major competitions, citing concern for her mental health.

"This isn't like a tennis match where I win or lose and from there people can say whether I did well or not," she wrote in part. "This is a look into my life from certain time periods and I can't fight the feeling of wondering how will it be received."

Osaka added that the project is "in some ways my soul and a reflection of who I am" and hoped that the project could be relatable to others.

"I hope there are pieces that people can relate to and maybe other pieces that would help people understand why I make the choices I make. If it doesn't that's cool too, it took me a while but I realize that I can't please everyone and I'm really not trying to. When I go to sleep at night I can only hope I am at peace with myself and I hope the same thing rings true for anyone reading this. I'm excited/nervous for you guys to see it and I hope you enjoy it lol. Love you all and stay safe," she wrote.

"I love you watched it last night and got teary eyed so much. For certain i felt i could relate to a lot. its good to be at peace with you. you are beautiful inside and out," a fan wrote.

"After watching, I feel like we all have a little Naomi Osaka inside of us. Our journeys are all so different, but yet we experience all the same feels," someone said.

"Excellent work naomi congratulations. blessings," a commenter added.

"Thank you for sharing something so tender and vulnerable," another person continued.

This documentary comes weeks after Osaka announced that she would be withdrawing from the 2021 French Open after announcing she would not participate in the competition's press conferences to protect her mental health, which has inspired widespread support and introspection on self-care, particularly for athletes.

Earlier this week, Osaka's influence was demonstrated further when she announced the release of a Barbie doll in her image, which sold out in hours.

"I really hope every child is reminded that they can be and do anything," she wrote in part in an Instagram post. "This is really seeing a dream of mine come to life, having your own Barbie and potentially seeing little kids playing with it. Omg."

Naomi Osaka has a new title: Barbie doll.

Naomi Osaka, who was born in Japan but moved to New York at the age of three, relinquished her American citizenship in 2019.

In Naomi Osaka's impressive tennis career so far, she has won four Grand Slam titles, reached a number one ranking in January 2019, and is set to represent Japan at the Olympics later this month. But Osaka has also taken a stand by being outspoken for social and racial justice and publicly taking time away from tennis to focus on her mental health.

"It's such an honor to be a part of the Barbie Role Model series, and to remind young girls that they can make a difference in the world."

The 23-year-old athlete announced her new Barbie Role Model doll on Monday.

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Naomi Osaka Says She Was 'Terrified' to Release Netflix Doc, Calls It 'a Reflection of Who I Am'

Yahoo Eurosport UK 17 July, 2021 - 02:00pm

The reigning U.S. Open tennis player champ, 23, reflected on opening up her life fans and expressed her hope that viewers will understand her decision-making process after watching the docuseries, which has been in the works for two and a half years.

However, "in light of everything that happened recently I was terrified of this being released," she wrote, presumably referring to her withdrawals from the French Open and Wimbledon to focus on her mental health.

"This isn't like a tennis match where I win or lose and from there people can say whether I did well or not," she continued. "This is a look into my life from certain time period and I can't fight the feeling of wondering how it will be received. This is in some ways my soul and a reflection of who I am." 

RELATED: Naomi Osaka Grieves Kobe Bryant's Death in Netflix Doc, Wonders How 'to Carry on His Mentality in Tennis'

The four-time singles Grand Slam winner said she hopes "there are pieces that people can relate to and maybe other pieces that would help people understand why I make the choices I make."

"If it doesn't that's cool too, it took me a while but I realized that I can't please everyone and I'm really not trying to," Osaka said. "When I go to sleep at night I can only hope I am at peace with myself and I hope the same rings true for anyone reading this."

She concluded, "I'm excited/nervous for you guys to see it and I hope you enjoy it. lol love you all and stay safe."

Osaka similarly reflected on being in the public eye in a cover story interview with Vogue Hong Kong published Friday.

"It isn't easy having so many eyeballs on you, each with an opinion about who they think you are without knowing you first," she told the outlet. "I try to surround myself with people that know me best. At the end of the day, the only opinion that matters is your own and [that of] the people close to you."

RELATED: Naomi Osaka Wins Best Female Athlete at 2021 ESPY Awards After Speaking Out About Mental Health

Naomi Osaka: Playing By Her Own Rules includes several impactful moments of the tennis professional's life in the two years after her 2018 U.S. Open victory over Serena Williams.

In the second episode of the docuseries, Osaka opened up about Kobe Bryant's death in some self-shot footage filmed one day after the Los Angeles Lakers legend died in a helicopter crash alongside his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others.

"It's so amazing how one person can, like, touch the hearts of so many people. I've been walking around and there's so many people with Bryant jerseys on," she said.

"When I talked to him, I felt so similar to him. Like the way he was talking, the way he would describe how, I don't know, he would do things to get under his opponents' skin or whatever. I was like, 'That's literally what I do.' So I'm feeling like I let him down, like, I'm supposed to carry on his mentality in tennis and here I am like, having what ... I haven't won a Grand Slam. Like, I'm losing matches because I'm mentally weak, and he's ... that's so uncharacteristic of him," she said in the footage.

"We're having all these talks and I'm not even doing what we're talking about," she continued. "So it's like I'm just gonna text him again, like, 'How do you heal with this situation?' And then I didn't text him that 'cause I didn't wanna feel like a loser, and now I'll never have the chance to talk to him again. I don't know, like wow."

Naomi Osaka: Playing By Her Own Rules is now streaming on Netflix.

Naomi Osaka was told her 'black card was revoked' for representing Japan in Olympics instead of US

Daily Mail 17 July, 2021 - 02:00pm

By Carly Stern For Dailymail.com

Japanese-Haitian tennis star Naomi Osaka has hit back at critics of her decision to represent Japan at the Olympics this months, revealing that she was told her 'black card was revoked' after she announced that she would not be playing for the US in Tokyo.   

The 23-year-old, who was born in in Chūō-ku, Osaka to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, was raised in the US but has been competing under the Japanese flag since she was a teenager.

So while she insists it shouldn't come as a surprise that she will continue to represent Japan at the Olympic Games this summer, the star says she has faced backlash for the decision.

'I've been playing under the Japan flag since I was 14. It was never even a secret that I'm going to play for Japan for the Olympics,' she says her Netflix docu-series, which premiered today.

'I don't choose America and suddenly people are like, "Your black card is revoked." And it's like, African American isn't the only black, you know?' she went on. 

Home country: Tennis superstar Naomi Osaka will represent Japan at the Olympics this month — a fact that has displeased some of her American fans

Tennis star: The 23-year-old who was born in in Chūō-ku, Osaka to a Japanese mother and Haitian father but was raised in the US

'I don't choose America and suddenly people are like, "Your black card is revoked." And it's like, African American isn't the only black, you know?' she said  

'I don't know, I feel like people really don't know the difference between nationality and race because there's a lot of black people in Brazil, but they're Brazilian.' 

Naomi moved to New York from Japan at age three, but she has always chosen to represent Japan in any international competition, a decision that was made when she was still just a child.  

Her mother, Tamaki, told the Wall Street Journal: 'We made the decision that Naomi would represent Japan at an early age.

'She was born in Osaka and was brought up in a household of Japanese and Haitian culture. Quite simply, Naomi and her sister Mari have always felt Japanese so that was our only rationale. 

'It was never a financially motivated decision nor were we ever swayed either way by any national federation,' she added.

Plus, Naomi is no longer an American citizen. She retained dual American and Japanese citizenship for her entire childhood, but Japanese law mandates that anyone with dual citizenship born after 1985 must choose one by their 22nd birthday. 

So ahead of turning 22 in 2019, Naomi publicly announced that she would be renouncing her US citizenship. 

'It is a special feeling to aim for the Olympics as a representative of Japan,' she told the Japanese broadcaster NHK. 'I think that playing with the pride of the country will make me feel more emotional.' 

Her mother (left), said: 'We made the decision that Naomi would represent Japan at an early age... Naomi and her sister Mari have always felt Japanese so that was our only rationale

'I've been playing under the Japan flag since I was 14. It was never even a secret that I'm going to play for Japan for the Olympics,' Naomi said in her new docu-series 

Cover girl! She recently covered the August 2021 issue of Vogue Japan

Statement: Naomi is also an outspoken supporter of Black Lives Matter and during the US Open in 2020, she wore masks featuring the names of slain black men and women

As well as actively celebrating her Japanese heritage, Naomi has been an incredibly outspoken supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement. 

She has regularly promoted the movement on T-shirts and face masks during tournaments and during the US Open last year, she regularly sported face coverings that bore the names of slain black men and women, including Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Trayvon Martin, and Elijah McClain. 

In August 2020, she pulled out of her semi-final at the Western & Southern Open in New York following the police shooting of Jacob Blake, saying at the time: 'Before I am an athlete, I am a black woman.'

Shortly after she made her announcement, tournament organizers made the decision to suspend play for the day.

The highest-paid female athlete in the world, Naomi also took the opportunity in her Netflix series to talk about her decision to withdraw from the French Open in May after refusing to take part in her press obligations, citing her struggles with depression and anxiety, which she began struggling with after beating Serena Williams in the US Open final in 2018.    

Naomi won the match 6-2, 6-4, but her victory was overshadowed by the bitter controversy that erupted over Serena's on-court arguments with chair umpire Carlos Ramos of Portugal, who issued her with a string of fines.  

As a result of the on-court drama, Naomi found herself thrust into the center of a media frenzy and she has remained very much in the spotlight ever since. 

'Before I won the US Open, so many people told my Dad I would never be anything,' she said. 

Naomi, 23, was born in Chūō-ku, Osaka to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father and spent the first three years of her life living there with her family. 

Her mother, Tamaki Osaka, was born in Hokkaido, Japan, while her father, Leonard Francois, is originally from Jacmel, Haiti. The couple met in Japan when Leonard was a college student and Tamaki was in high school, when the former was on a trip to Hokkaido. 

Both Naomi and her older sister Mari were given their mother's surname because the family felt that it would make things easier for the siblings to have a Japanese name while living in the country. 

'It was mostly a practical matter when they lived in Japan, helpful for enrolling in schools and renting apartments,' the New York Times reported in 2018. 

The tennis pro relocated to Long Island, New York, with her family when she was three years old. They spent several years living with Leonard's parents, before later moving to Florida in order to focus on Naomi and Mari's tennis training.  

Until recently, Naomi held dual American and Japanese citizenship, however she made the decision to renounce her US citizenship in 2019 ahead of her 22nd birthday in keeping with a Japanese law, which mandates that anyone with dual citizenship who was born after 1985 must choose one by the time they turn 22.  

Naomi has also expressed on a number of occasions that she does not 'feel like she's American', explaining that she does have a very close connection to both her Japanese and her Haitian heritage. 

'My dad’s Haitian, so I grew up in a Haitian household in New York,' she said during a press conference in 2018 when asked about her 'relationship with Japanese culture and US culture'. 

'And my mom’s Japanese and I grew up with the Japanese culture too, and if you’re saying American, I guess because I lived in America, I also have that too.' 

Candid: The highest-paid female athlete in the world, Naomi also took the opportunity in her Netflix series to talk about her decision to withdraw from the French Open in May 

'Before I won the US open, so many people told my Dad I would never be anything,' she said 

'I think the amount of attention I get is kind of ridiculous — no one prepares you for that,' she went on 

'I think the amount of attention I get is kind of ridiculous — no one prepares you for that. I always have this pressure to maintain this sweet-pea image, but now I don't care what anyone has to say. 

In May, Naomi announced that she would not fulfill any media obligations at the French Open, releasing a statement on Twitter in which she cited her mental health as the reason for her decision not to speak to press. 

'I'm writing this to say I'm not going to do any press during Roland Garros,' she said.

'I've often felt that people have no regard for athletes mental health and this rings very true whenever I see a press conference or partake in one. 

'We're often sat there and asked questions that we've been asked multiple times before or asked questions that bring doubt into our minds and I'm just not going to subject myself to people that doubt me.

'I've watched many clips of athletes breaking down after a loss in the press room and I know you have as well. I believe that whole situation is kicking a person while they're down and I don't understand the reasoning behind it.  

'Me not doing press is nothing personal to the tournament and a couple journalists have interviewed me since I was young so I have a friendly relationship with most of them. 

Stepping back: Naomi first announced that she wouldn't do press at the French Open citing mental health concerns as the reason behind her decision

Penalty: Naomi was fined $15,000 by officials for refusing to appear in front of the media after her first-round match  (pictured May 30 after her win)

A break: On May 31, she announced that she was stepping away from the tournament entirely

'However, if the organizations think that they can just keep saying "do press or you're gonna be fined", and continue to ignore the mental health of the athletes that are the centerpiece of their cooperation then I just gotta laugh. 

'Anyways, I hope the considerable amount that I get fined for this will go towards a mental health charity,' she concluded.

Naomi was, in fact, fined $15,000 by officials for refusing to appear in front of the media after her first-round match, with organizers saying she would face 'more substantial fines and future Grand Slam suspensions' if she continued her boycott.

So on May 31, she announced that she was stepping away from the tournament entirely.  

'I'm gonna take some time away from the court now, but when the time is right I really want to work with the tour to discuss ways we can make things better for the players, press and fans,' she said.

Revealing her struggles with depression and anxiety, she said: 'I think now the best thing for the tournament, the other players and my well-being is that I withdraw so that everyone can get back to focusing on the tennis going on in Paris.'       

The star's sponsors, including Nike and MasterCard, backed her decision. Her multiple sponsors have helping her to rake in $55.2 million in the past 12 months. 

Only $5.2 million came from tennis winnings, while the rest came from endorsement deals with the likes of Nike, Beats by Dre, MasterCard, and Nissin. 

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'Naomi Osaka' docuseries takes intimate look at tennis star - The Mainichi

The Mainichi 17 July, 2021 - 02:00pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Those looking for definitive answers about Naomi Osaka and how she copes with the demands of her career and fame shouldn't expect to find them in a new Netflix docuseries about the four-time Grand Slam champion.

It's the tennis star's unresolved questions that are the heart of "Naomi Osaka," director-producer Garrett Bradley said of the series that was taped over a two-year period starting with the 2019 U.S. Open. Production concluded in early 2021 before Osaka's withdrawal from the French Open.

The three-part series debuting Friday is a contemplative, intimate look at a young athlete finding her way. Film of major tournaments, wins and losses, is interwoven with scenes of Osaka's time with family and her boyfriend, the rapper Cordae; her training and business demands; Osaka's reflections on her career, multiracial identity and the death of mentor Kobe Bryant, and her decision to protest police killings of Black men and women.

"It was really important for me to not go into the project with an agenda or really even with an opinion," Bradley, a 2021 Oscar nominee for the documentary "Time," said. "I really tried to open myself up to her world and where she was at, and tried to understand the sort of essence of who she was."

As filming progressed, she said, it became clear that the series' foundation would be the conundrums faced not only by Osaka but society at large.

Those inquiries are "connected to value systems and self-definition, and how one can create a more holistic understanding of themselves in any given environment that they find themselves in," said Bradley, whose fellow producers include LeBron James, under the umbrella of his SpringHill production company.

Osaka, 23, who was not made available for an interview, withdrew from the French Open last May, citing "huge waves of anxiety" before speaking to the media and revealing that she has suffered long bouts of depression.

She also skipped the just-ended Wimbledon, with her agent saying she wanted personal time, but is expected to compete in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics for her native Japan. Osaka was just a few years old when she, her sister and their Japanese mother and Haitian father moved to the United States.

In a Time magazine essay published July 8, Osaka wrote that, "Believe it or not, I am naturally introverted and do not court the spotlight. I always try to push myself to speak up for what I believe to be right, but that often comes at a cost of great anxiety."

"I do hope that people can relate and understand it's O.K. to not be O.K., and it's O.K. to talk about it. There are people who can help, and there is usually light at the end of any tunnel," she said, thanking Michelle Obama, Michael Phelps and other public figures for offering support.

The Netflix docuseries includes footage of Osaka and her sister, Mari, on the court as youngsters, with the tennis star recalling spending at least eight hours a day at practice, adding, "I was just tired."

Mari Osaka, 25, also played professional tennis but said in a social media post in March that she was retiring from the sport because it was "a journey which I didn't enjoy ultimately."

The docuseries sketches a portrait of Naomi Osaka as thoughtful and driven to succeed but struggling to cope with her sport's demands and her future. At one moment of self-reflection she says, "So what am I, if not a good tennis player?"

Filmmaker Bradley cautions that the series should not be seen as definitive, but rather a snapshot of a brief period in a life that continues to "evolve and grow."

"This moment that we captured was her in the process of a learning curve, which I think she directly articulates really beautifully, (that) there are elements of fame that are hard to be prepared for," Bradley said. "The sustenance that she finds is in accepting where she is currently in this moment, and certainly in her family and in her loved ones, but also is in finding her own voice. And that includes choosing when to use it and when not to."

Asked how she perceived Osaka's emotional well-being, Bradley said she considers her "an incredibly strong and really brilliant person."

"She's in control of her own narrative, and I think that's a beautiful thing," she said.

Copyright THE MAINICHI NEWSPAPERS. All rights reserved.

Netflix’s Naomi Osaka Docuseries Couldn’t Be More Timely

HuffPost 17 July, 2021 - 02:00pm

“I’ve been always following people, and, like, sort of following blueprints of people. And now I feel like I didn’t really see a lane or a path that I like, and I was at a standstill,” Naomi Osaka says in the third episode of a new Netflix documentary series that gives audiences a window into her life. “And then I found that you have to make your own path.” 

Directed by Oscar nominee Garrett Bradley, the docuseries “Naomi Osaka” has been in the works for several years and follows the tennis star throughout 2019 and 2020. Yet its release on Friday could not be more timely.

In the last few months, Osaka has been more outspoken about the importance of prioritizing her mental health. She withdrew from both the French Open and Wimbledon. Her candor has brought more attention to the toll of being in the public eye, especially as a young Black and Asian woman, and how sports media could rethink its coverage of star athletes.

Tennis Great John McEnroe Expresses Support For Naomi Osaka: ‘I Can Relate’

HuffPost 16 July, 2021 - 05:42pm

Tennis legend John McEnroe expressed support for Naomi Osaka, the 23-year-old tennis superstar who has made headlines for the steps she’s taken to prioritize her mental health.

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times that came out Friday, McEnroe, a former world No. 1 player who has seven Grand Slam singles titles to his name, said he could “relate” to Osaka’s statements about anxiety and mental health.

“It’s extremely important, probably more so than ever because of this pandemic,” McEnroe said of how outspoken Osaka has been about her own mental health journey.

“I felt like my legs were shaking the first time I stepped foot at 18 [years old] on the center court of Wimbledon,” continued McEnroe, who is now a tennis analyst and occasional actor. (His most recent gig was providing narration for the Netflix show “Never Have I Ever”). “It was overwhelming to play Jimmy Connors and to have all these people … I found that I was more nervous going into the press conference. So I can relate to what [Osaka is] saying and I sympathize with it.”

Osaka, citing mental health concerns, dropped out of the French Open in May after tournament organizers fined her for refusing to participate in post-match press conferences.

“I’ve often felt that people have no regard for athletes’ mental health and this rings very true whenever I see a press conference or partake in one,” she said of her decision to not speak to media.

Osaka, a four-time Grand Slam winner who is ranked second in the world in women’s tennis, later withdrew from the German Open and announced her decision to drop out of Wimbledon to take “some personal time with friends and family.”

Her agent said last month that she was still expected to play in the upcoming Olympics, where she will represent Japan.

In his L.A. Times interview, McEnroe said he was “on her side because I want to see her flourish because it’s good for the sport.” 

“She’s a big star,” he said. “When she went out last year at the [U.S.] Open, and she was wearing the mask with George Floyd’s name, it really had a big impact, I think, for us as a sport that she was sending a really strong message.”

He added that Osaka’s experience with the press has shown that there’s clearly something “wrong” with the current system.

“She’s the highest paid female athlete in the world, so if someone that makes tremendous sums of money can’t handle it, you’re like, ‘Whoa, wait, something’s wrong with this,’” he said. “So hopefully it’ll get better soon.”

In an interview last month, McEnroe expressed concerns that Osaka might retire early like Swedish legend Bjorn Borg, who left the sport at the age of 26 after winning 11 Grand Slam singles titles. Borg said at the time that he was feeling burned out.

“There’s a danger that Osaka is not going to keep going,” McEnroe said on his brother Patrick McEnroe’s “Holding Court” podcast.

“I feel really concerned, because Bjorn Borg was one of the best things that ever happened to our sport, and I feel like he was pushed out of the game. And I think Osaka’s feeling something similar right now,“ he added.

A new Netflix docuseries about Osaka’s life was released on Friday. She has expressed trepidation about how the series will be received, saying on social media that it was “in some ways my soul and a reflection of who I am.”

“I hope there are pieces that people can relate to and maybe other pieces that would help people understand why I make the choices I make,” she wrote on Instagram. “If it doesn’t that’s cool too, it took me a while but I realize that I can’t please everyone and I’m really not trying to.”

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