Nest Goodbye: Google's new Nest Doorbell can't record continuously even when it's wired-up

Technology

Android Police 05 August, 2021 - 01:08pm 83 views

Microsoft's Windows development team has today released Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22000.120 for Insiders in both the Dev Channel and the Beta Channel. Today's build brings a handful of improvements and a long list of fixes to those testing the next generation of Windows. 

For more details about today's Windows 11 Insider Preview Build, head over to the official blog post. 

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New Nest cameras and Nest Doorbell first look!

CNET 05 August, 2021 - 04:20pm

The new Nest Doorbell is here — and it could be a serious Ring rival | CNN Underscored

CNN 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

This refreshed Doorbell aims to deliver smarter notifications and offer a wide field of view to see everything at your door to stand out from the increasingly crowded video doorbell space. Ring’s already released a multitude of doorbells since the start of 2021. And on paper, Nest has a pretty compelling package to compete with them.

The Nest Doorbell is up for preorder now at $179.99 in your choice of Snow, Ivy, Linen and Ash. It will start shipping on Aug. 24 and officially goes on sale that day. You also won’t need to worry about choosing between a wired or wireless model — the Nest Doorbell features a built-in battery and supports voltage wiring. This way, it can be used in a wired or wireless setup directly out of the box.

Google will be offering a few accessories like wedges to have the Doorbell tilt or look a specific way for $14.99, plates for $9.99 and an AC adapter for $24.99.

And while Hello is no longer in the name, the Nest Doorbell will illuminate an LED ring around the button when it notices someone approaching. It’s a nice touch and fits in line with Nest’s designs from the past. The camera up top is capable of delivering HDR video at 960 x 1280 pixels. Specifically, it’s an HD view with 6x digital zoom and 145-degree field of view. This equals out to a 3-to-4 ratio, which should present your front steps, hallway or yard in all its glory.

Most importantly, you should be able to capture if a package is left directly in front of the door to a tall delivery person. Night Vision is included here through infrared LEDs, and Google says it should see up to 10 feet. We’re eager to put this to the test closer to launch.

And as you’d expect from a Nest Doorbell, it will connect to the internet via Wi-Fi and works with the Google Home app for Android or iOS.

There’s only one model of the Doorbell and it includes a battery inside by default, but it also supports wired doorbell power through a wire. It’s a two-in-one solution with just one model. The extra trick here is that the internal battery will still get charged, and in the event of a power outage, it will still record and capture events for a limited amount of time.

Nest is describing three battery life estimates for different scenarios. For a busy doorbell that delivers between 25 and 30 events per day, you can expect about a month of battery life. One that delivers 13 to 16 events is closer to two and a half months, while a Doorbell with just two to five events per day is closer to six months. Mileage will vary here and is very dependent on your location.

When it comes time to charge the Nest Doorbell, you’ll need to do so with a USB-C cable. Unlike Ring wired doorbells, Nest isn’t using a user-removable battery pack. The company had to go this route with the battery to keep the design slim and allow for both wired and wireless uses.

Out of the box, the Nest Doorbell will support four alert types, deliver three hours of video activity and support motion zones. It will be able to detect people, animals, vehicles and packages. And here’s the cooler part — though free is always really cool — the video stream processing happens all on the device. With a machine learning (ML) chip inside, along with many other components, the Nest Doorbell can analyze footage on-device and in real time to see who’s in the frame.

In a demo, we saw the Doorbell recognize a delivery truck and a person walking out of it, leaving a package on the front. That’s pretty impressive and speaks to Google’s advanced technology chops, but also delivers an excellent experience, as the Doorbell can understand the logic and identify the proper event to notify you on. This way, you don’t get thousands of notifications for the same event. From a privacy standpoint, on-device processing versus your information being tossed in the cloud is generally safer.

What’s missing, though? Well, if you want the Nest Hello to detect faces and people, that will require you to get Nest Aware or Nest Aware Plus. Those plans are also needed to upgrade your video history. Let’s break it down, shall we?

Out of the box, it will record event history for a maximum of three hours. You can connect to the Doorbell for a live view 24/7, but there’s no option for continuous recording with the Doorbell.

The view in the app is also designed to work better with other Nest devices. You can see notifications in real time listed out in a grouped view from all Nest cams and doorbells. The idea behind it is for a less cluttered view that doesn’t result in multiple events. You can also access a quick settings menu from the live view for the Doorbell (or any cam) to quickly use two-way talk or to zoom in. You’ll also be able to hear who’s at the door through a Nest speaker or see a live view on a Nest Hub.

The Nest Doorbell is shaping up to be an improvement over the Hello in some core ways — namely, more features without paying for a subscription. For $179.99, you’re getting a doorbell that works in a wired or wireless setup, a sleek design and many features.

We’ll be going hands-on soon and will see how the Doorbell stacks up. But on paper, it seems to be a strong competitor against Ring, namely for the Video Doorbell 4 and Video Doorbell Pro 2. While those feature different designs, swappable batteries in Doorbell 4 and an advanced motion tracker in Pro 2, neither is pegged as a one-size-fits-all solution. Plus, there’s no on-device package detection offered, which is a significant feature to be missing.

If you’re sold on the Nest Doorbell, it’s up for preorder now in a selection of colors for $179.99.

By subscribing, you agree to our privacy policy

The new Nest Doorbell is here — and it could be a serious Ring rival | CNN Underscored

Made by Google 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

This refreshed Doorbell aims to deliver smarter notifications and offer a wide field of view to see everything at your door to stand out from the increasingly crowded video doorbell space. Ring’s already released a multitude of doorbells since the start of 2021. And on paper, Nest has a pretty compelling package to compete with them.

The Nest Doorbell is up for preorder now at $179.99 in your choice of Snow, Ivy, Linen and Ash. It will start shipping on Aug. 24 and officially goes on sale that day. You also won’t need to worry about choosing between a wired or wireless model — the Nest Doorbell features a built-in battery and supports voltage wiring. This way, it can be used in a wired or wireless setup directly out of the box.

Google will be offering a few accessories like wedges to have the Doorbell tilt or look a specific way for $14.99, plates for $9.99 and an AC adapter for $24.99.

And while Hello is no longer in the name, the Nest Doorbell will illuminate an LED ring around the button when it notices someone approaching. It’s a nice touch and fits in line with Nest’s designs from the past. The camera up top is capable of delivering HDR video at 960 x 1280 pixels. Specifically, it’s an HD view with 6x digital zoom and 145-degree field of view. This equals out to a 3-to-4 ratio, which should present your front steps, hallway or yard in all its glory.

Most importantly, you should be able to capture if a package is left directly in front of the door to a tall delivery person. Night Vision is included here through infrared LEDs, and Google says it should see up to 10 feet. We’re eager to put this to the test closer to launch.

And as you’d expect from a Nest Doorbell, it will connect to the internet via Wi-Fi and works with the Google Home app for Android or iOS.

There’s only one model of the Doorbell and it includes a battery inside by default, but it also supports wired doorbell power through a wire. It’s a two-in-one solution with just one model. The extra trick here is that the internal battery will still get charged, and in the event of a power outage, it will still record and capture events for a limited amount of time.

Nest is describing three battery life estimates for different scenarios. For a busy doorbell that delivers between 25 and 30 events per day, you can expect about a month of battery life. One that delivers 13 to 16 events is closer to two and a half months, while a Doorbell with just two to five events per day is closer to six months. Mileage will vary here and is very dependent on your location.

When it comes time to charge the Nest Doorbell, you’ll need to do so with a USB-C cable. Unlike Ring wired doorbells, Nest isn’t using a user-removable battery pack. The company had to go this route with the battery to keep the design slim and allow for both wired and wireless uses.

Out of the box, the Nest Doorbell will support four alert types, deliver three hours of video activity and support motion zones. It will be able to detect people, animals, vehicles and packages. And here’s the cooler part — though free is always really cool — the video stream processing happens all on the device. With a machine learning (ML) chip inside, along with many other components, the Nest Doorbell can analyze footage on-device and in real time to see who’s in the frame.

In a demo, we saw the Doorbell recognize a delivery truck and a person walking out of it, leaving a package on the front. That’s pretty impressive and speaks to Google’s advanced technology chops, but also delivers an excellent experience, as the Doorbell can understand the logic and identify the proper event to notify you on. This way, you don’t get thousands of notifications for the same event. From a privacy standpoint, on-device processing versus your information being tossed in the cloud is generally safer.

What’s missing, though? Well, if you want the Nest Hello to detect faces and people, that will require you to get Nest Aware or Nest Aware Plus. Those plans are also needed to upgrade your video history. Let’s break it down, shall we?

Out of the box, it will record event history for a maximum of three hours. You can connect to the Doorbell for a live view 24/7, but there’s no option for continuous recording with the Doorbell.

The view in the app is also designed to work better with other Nest devices. You can see notifications in real time listed out in a grouped view from all Nest cams and doorbells. The idea behind it is for a less cluttered view that doesn’t result in multiple events. You can also access a quick settings menu from the live view for the Doorbell (or any cam) to quickly use two-way talk or to zoom in. You’ll also be able to hear who’s at the door through a Nest speaker or see a live view on a Nest Hub.

The Nest Doorbell is shaping up to be an improvement over the Hello in some core ways — namely, more features without paying for a subscription. For $179.99, you’re getting a doorbell that works in a wired or wireless setup, a sleek design and many features.

We’ll be going hands-on soon and will see how the Doorbell stacks up. But on paper, it seems to be a strong competitor against Ring, namely for the Video Doorbell 4 and Video Doorbell Pro 2. While those feature different designs, swappable batteries in Doorbell 4 and an advanced motion tracker in Pro 2, neither is pegged as a one-size-fits-all solution. Plus, there’s no on-device package detection offered, which is a significant feature to be missing.

If you’re sold on the Nest Doorbell, it’s up for preorder now in a selection of colors for $179.99.

By subscribing, you agree to our privacy policy

Google's new Nest Cams and Doorbell keep recording even if Wi-Fi and power are out

TechRadar 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

Four new home security devices from Google

The new product line-up includes the Nest Doorbell, Nest Cam, Nest Cam with Floodlight and the new Nest Cam Indoor.

All four feature optimized HDR, which Google claims provides better quality video both during the day and at night. The cameras (but not the Doorbell) are said to pack 2x more pixels and a 2x higher frame rate, for smoother, more detailed recordings.

The Cams and Doorbell also come with Google's new TPU chip, which allows them to track and recognize objects on-device, taking the reliance off the cloud and providing faster and more reliable tracking.

The improved on-device machine learning has also got better at recognizing movement that isn't worth notifying owners about - such as rain and snow, or when a car drives along the street.

All the new devices can be controlled from the newly-redesigned Google Home app on your phone, and for the battery-powered devices you'll be able to keep an eye on power levels too.

If your Wi-Fi goes down, or your home suffers a power outage, the new Nest Doorbell, Cam and Cam with Floodlight can continue to record up to one hour's worth of footage (equivalent to around one week of events) on local storage.

Once the power/internet connection is restored, the recordings will be automatically uploaded to the cloud for you to view on your smartphone.

The Nest Doorbell is the natural successor to the Nest Hello which, unlike its predecessor, offers users the option of battery power - a first for Google's doorbell.

This means the Nest Doorbell doesn't need to be hard-wired into your property - although it can be if you prefer - with a rechargeable battery allowing for easy installation.

Google claims the Nest Doorbell battery can last around two and a half months on a single charge, based on it capturing 10-12 events a day. Battery life for the video doorbell will vary depending on climate, location and specific use cases.

The main rival to Nest Doorbell is Amazon's range of Ring devices, many of which are battery operated, so it makes sense for Google to follow suit here.

It boasts a fresh, minimalist design too, making it stand out from the Hello with its longer, flatter finish, plus it has a rainproof IP54 rating.

You can also choose the chime the Doorbell uses. It works with Google's range of Nest speakers and displays to alert you when someone has pressed the bell, but you can also connect to an existing doorbell chime if you opt for the wired installation method.

The Nest Doorbell price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) and it's available to pre-order from August 5. It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

That makes Doorbell cheaper than Nest Hello ($229 / £229), which may go some way to explaining the lower resolution on offer with the former recording at 1280 x 960 and the latter is 1600 x 1200.

Officially titled Nest Cam (battery), this wire-free smart camera can be used both indoors and outdoors thanks to its IP54 rating that makes it rain proof.

The Nest Cam comes with a wall-mount in the box, but you can opt to purchase a table-top stand as well, which allows you to sit it on a side, which may be useful if using it indoors. 

Thanks to its built-in battery pack - which can last up to three months on a single charge - there's no need to locate the camera near a power outlet, but if you want the peace of mind of continuous power the Nest Cam can also be wired to the mains.

There will be a range of accessories available for the camera in the Google Store too, including weatherproof cables of varying lengths and an anti-theft mount.

Like the Doorbell, the new Nest Cam price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) with pre-orders live from August 5. 

It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

The Google Nest Cam with Floodlight is the firm's first connected floodlight. It features a centrally placed camera, with a floodlight either side of it.

Google has improved its machine learning algorithm, which it claims results in the floodlight only switching on when something important is happening - such as someone walking past the camera, but not when a car passes on the street in the background.

And finally, there's the second generation Nest Cam Indoor, which is Google's cheapest connected camera. As the name suggests, this isn't suitable for outdoor use, and there is no battery option here - instead, you'll have to find a power outlet to plug it in to.

The Nest Cam with Floodlight price will be $279.99 / £269.99 (around AU$370), while the Cam Indoor price will be $99.99 / £89.99 (around AU$130), when they go on sale later this year.

There's a war raging for the dominance of your smart home, and two of the biggest forces are Google and Amazon.

Both firms now offer a range of smart home products, from voice-enabled speakers and screens to doorbells, cameras, and more. 

When it comes to the home security cameras, the addition of a battery once again means Google's offering is more flexible about where it can be installed, and hopefully appealing to a wider audience just like Ring's Stick Up Cam.

Expect to see a reaction from Amazon later this year, as it responds to Google's new devices with what could be an overhaul of its own.

Amazon has hosted a large-scale device launch event in September for the previous four years, where it usually reveals a range of Alexa-enabled devices. Chances are we'll see the same again in 2021.

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Google's new Nest Cams and Doorbell keep recording even if Wi-Fi and power are out

Gizmodo 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

Four new home security devices from Google

The new product line-up includes the Nest Doorbell, Nest Cam, Nest Cam with Floodlight and the new Nest Cam Indoor.

All four feature optimized HDR, which Google claims provides better quality video both during the day and at night. The cameras (but not the Doorbell) are said to pack 2x more pixels and a 2x higher frame rate, for smoother, more detailed recordings.

The Cams and Doorbell also come with Google's new TPU chip, which allows them to track and recognize objects on-device, taking the reliance off the cloud and providing faster and more reliable tracking.

The improved on-device machine learning has also got better at recognizing movement that isn't worth notifying owners about - such as rain and snow, or when a car drives along the street.

All the new devices can be controlled from the newly-redesigned Google Home app on your phone, and for the battery-powered devices you'll be able to keep an eye on power levels too.

If your Wi-Fi goes down, or your home suffers a power outage, the new Nest Doorbell, Cam and Cam with Floodlight can continue to record up to one hour's worth of footage (equivalent to around one week of events) on local storage.

Once the power/internet connection is restored, the recordings will be automatically uploaded to the cloud for you to view on your smartphone.

The Nest Doorbell is the natural successor to the Nest Hello which, unlike its predecessor, offers users the option of battery power - a first for Google's doorbell.

This means the Nest Doorbell doesn't need to be hard-wired into your property - although it can be if you prefer - with a rechargeable battery allowing for easy installation.

Google claims the Nest Doorbell battery can last around two and a half months on a single charge, based on it capturing 10-12 events a day. Battery life for the video doorbell will vary depending on climate, location and specific use cases.

The main rival to Nest Doorbell is Amazon's range of Ring devices, many of which are battery operated, so it makes sense for Google to follow suit here.

It boasts a fresh, minimalist design too, making it stand out from the Hello with its longer, flatter finish, plus it has a rainproof IP54 rating.

You can also choose the chime the Doorbell uses. It works with Google's range of Nest speakers and displays to alert you when someone has pressed the bell, but you can also connect to an existing doorbell chime if you opt for the wired installation method.

The Nest Doorbell price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) and it's available to pre-order from August 5. It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

That makes Doorbell cheaper than Nest Hello ($229 / £229), which may go some way to explaining the lower resolution on offer with the former recording at 1280 x 960 and the latter is 1600 x 1200.

Officially titled Nest Cam (battery), this wire-free smart camera can be used both indoors and outdoors thanks to its IP54 rating that makes it rain proof.

The Nest Cam comes with a wall-mount in the box, but you can opt to purchase a table-top stand as well, which allows you to sit it on a side, which may be useful if using it indoors. 

Thanks to its built-in battery pack - which can last up to three months on a single charge - there's no need to locate the camera near a power outlet, but if you want the peace of mind of continuous power the Nest Cam can also be wired to the mains.

There will be a range of accessories available for the camera in the Google Store too, including weatherproof cables of varying lengths and an anti-theft mount.

Like the Doorbell, the new Nest Cam price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) with pre-orders live from August 5. 

It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

The Google Nest Cam with Floodlight is the firm's first connected floodlight. It features a centrally placed camera, with a floodlight either side of it.

Google has improved its machine learning algorithm, which it claims results in the floodlight only switching on when something important is happening - such as someone walking past the camera, but not when a car passes on the street in the background.

And finally, there's the second generation Nest Cam Indoor, which is Google's cheapest connected camera. As the name suggests, this isn't suitable for outdoor use, and there is no battery option here - instead, you'll have to find a power outlet to plug it in to.

The Nest Cam with Floodlight price will be $279.99 / £269.99 (around AU$370), while the Cam Indoor price will be $99.99 / £89.99 (around AU$130), when they go on sale later this year.

There's a war raging for the dominance of your smart home, and two of the biggest forces are Google and Amazon.

Both firms now offer a range of smart home products, from voice-enabled speakers and screens to doorbells, cameras, and more. 

When it comes to the home security cameras, the addition of a battery once again means Google's offering is more flexible about where it can be installed, and hopefully appealing to a wider audience just like Ring's Stick Up Cam.

Expect to see a reaction from Amazon later this year, as it responds to Google's new devices with what could be an overhaul of its own.

Amazon has hosted a large-scale device launch event in September for the previous four years, where it usually reveals a range of Alexa-enabled devices. Chances are we'll see the same again in 2021.

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Google's new Nest Cams and Doorbell keep recording even if Wi-Fi and power are out

Tom's Guide 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

Four new home security devices from Google

The new product line-up includes the Nest Doorbell, Nest Cam, Nest Cam with Floodlight and the new Nest Cam Indoor.

All four feature optimized HDR, which Google claims provides better quality video both during the day and at night. The cameras (but not the Doorbell) are said to pack 2x more pixels and a 2x higher frame rate, for smoother, more detailed recordings.

The Cams and Doorbell also come with Google's new TPU chip, which allows them to track and recognize objects on-device, taking the reliance off the cloud and providing faster and more reliable tracking.

The improved on-device machine learning has also got better at recognizing movement that isn't worth notifying owners about - such as rain and snow, or when a car drives along the street.

All the new devices can be controlled from the newly-redesigned Google Home app on your phone, and for the battery-powered devices you'll be able to keep an eye on power levels too.

If your Wi-Fi goes down, or your home suffers a power outage, the new Nest Doorbell, Cam and Cam with Floodlight can continue to record up to one hour's worth of footage (equivalent to around one week of events) on local storage.

Once the power/internet connection is restored, the recordings will be automatically uploaded to the cloud for you to view on your smartphone.

The Nest Doorbell is the natural successor to the Nest Hello which, unlike its predecessor, offers users the option of battery power - a first for Google's doorbell.

This means the Nest Doorbell doesn't need to be hard-wired into your property - although it can be if you prefer - with a rechargeable battery allowing for easy installation.

Google claims the Nest Doorbell battery can last around two and a half months on a single charge, based on it capturing 10-12 events a day. Battery life for the video doorbell will vary depending on climate, location and specific use cases.

The main rival to Nest Doorbell is Amazon's range of Ring devices, many of which are battery operated, so it makes sense for Google to follow suit here.

It boasts a fresh, minimalist design too, making it stand out from the Hello with its longer, flatter finish, plus it has a rainproof IP54 rating.

You can also choose the chime the Doorbell uses. It works with Google's range of Nest speakers and displays to alert you when someone has pressed the bell, but you can also connect to an existing doorbell chime if you opt for the wired installation method.

The Nest Doorbell price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) and it's available to pre-order from August 5. It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

That makes Doorbell cheaper than Nest Hello ($229 / £229), which may go some way to explaining the lower resolution on offer with the former recording at 1280 x 960 and the latter is 1600 x 1200.

Officially titled Nest Cam (battery), this wire-free smart camera can be used both indoors and outdoors thanks to its IP54 rating that makes it rain proof.

The Nest Cam comes with a wall-mount in the box, but you can opt to purchase a table-top stand as well, which allows you to sit it on a side, which may be useful if using it indoors. 

Thanks to its built-in battery pack - which can last up to three months on a single charge - there's no need to locate the camera near a power outlet, but if you want the peace of mind of continuous power the Nest Cam can also be wired to the mains.

There will be a range of accessories available for the camera in the Google Store too, including weatherproof cables of varying lengths and an anti-theft mount.

Like the Doorbell, the new Nest Cam price is $179.99 / £179.99 (around AU$240) with pre-orders live from August 5. 

It will go on-sale on August 24 in 18 countries including the US, Canada, UK, Australia and a host of European countries.

The Google Nest Cam with Floodlight is the firm's first connected floodlight. It features a centrally placed camera, with a floodlight either side of it.

Google has improved its machine learning algorithm, which it claims results in the floodlight only switching on when something important is happening - such as someone walking past the camera, but not when a car passes on the street in the background.

And finally, there's the second generation Nest Cam Indoor, which is Google's cheapest connected camera. As the name suggests, this isn't suitable for outdoor use, and there is no battery option here - instead, you'll have to find a power outlet to plug it in to.

The Nest Cam with Floodlight price will be $279.99 / £269.99 (around AU$370), while the Cam Indoor price will be $99.99 / £89.99 (around AU$130), when they go on sale later this year.

There's a war raging for the dominance of your smart home, and two of the biggest forces are Google and Amazon.

Both firms now offer a range of smart home products, from voice-enabled speakers and screens to doorbells, cameras, and more. 

When it comes to the home security cameras, the addition of a battery once again means Google's offering is more flexible about where it can be installed, and hopefully appealing to a wider audience just like Ring's Stick Up Cam.

Expect to see a reaction from Amazon later this year, as it responds to Google's new devices with what could be an overhaul of its own.

Amazon has hosted a large-scale device launch event in September for the previous four years, where it usually reveals a range of Alexa-enabled devices. Chances are we'll see the same again in 2021.

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Google’s new Nest cameras and doorbell have lower prices and more smarts

The Verge 05 August, 2021 - 08:00am

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Google has announced a new line of home security cameras and a video doorbell under its Nest brand. The new models, which include an indoor-only camera, an indoor / outdoor camera, a floodlight, and the video doorbell, replace the older Nest IQ cameras and Nest Hello doorbell. The main themes with the new devices are a unified design language and more accessible pricing — each model costs less than the camera it’s replacing, while adding more capabilities.

The design of the new cameras will be familiar to anyone who’s seen other Nest products released in the past couple of years, such as the latest Nest Thermostat, Nest WiFi, or the Nest Audio smart speaker. The company has been moving toward softer edges and muted color palettes, and the new cameras adhere to that with color options that are meant to blend in, not stand out.

Google is also adding a bit more intelligence to the cameras, thanks to advances in on-device machine learning. The new models can detect people, animals, packages, and vehicles and provide specific alerts for each of them without the need for cloud processing (or its related subscription costs). (The Familiar Faces feature, which uses cloud-based facial recognition, still requires a paid plan.) The idea behind it all is to cut down the noise from constant motion notifications, a common complaint with home security cameras and video doorbells.

Google says the Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) in the new cameras allows the algorithms to run on twice as many pixels and at twice the frame rate of previous Nest Cams, which provides more reliable event detection and alerts, similar to how a TPU will improve the upcoming Pixel 6 smartphone’s capabilities. The cameras also include three hours of event history without a subscription and have internal storage for up to an hour of event clips (roughly equivalent to a week of events) in case the Wi-Fi goes down.

Lastly, Google is pitching versatility with this lineup, as both the doorbell and the new Nest Cam can be used in either battery-powered or wired configurations. There is also a range of accessories available for wall or table mounting, or setting up a camera indoors or out.

What you won’t see emphasized with the new models is 4K resolution or spec-race hardware advancements. Google says the tradeoff required for 4K video — higher bandwidth consumption, larger cloud storage costs — outweighs the benefits. Plus, Google believes things like better HDR processing and smarter notifications are more helpful than just increasing the resolution would be.

The centerpiece of the lineup is the new $179.99 Nest Cam, which can be used indoors or out. (Sophie Le Guen, Google’s lead product manager for Home and Nest products, tells me that outdoors is where the company is seeing the most interest and growth in security cameras.) It has an internal battery that the company claims lasts up to three months between charges with typical usage. It can also be wired into permanent power; an optional weatherproof power cable or solar panel is available for outdoor installations.

The Nest Cam has a soft, rounded design partially made with recycled plastic, but it maintains IP54 weather sealing. Google says its magnetic mounting base has been tested to withstand storm force winds and there will be an anti-theft mount that can be used to make sure the camera isn’t stolen.

The camera records 16:9 1080p video at up to 30fps through a 130-degree field of view. You can zoom up to 6x digitally in the Google Home app when viewing the feed or a recorded clip. Should you need more than the three hours of event history (clips of events that happened within the past three hours) included for free, you can pay for a Nest Aware or Aware Plus subscription that offers up to 10 days of 24/7 recording and 60 days of event history.

The new Nest Cam is available in white and can be preordered starting today, August 5th, with shipments expected to begin on August 24th.

The $279.99 Nest Cam with Floodlight is Google’s first connected floodlight camera and fills a gap in the lineup that other companies have addressed for some time now. Effectively, it’s a Nest Cam attached to a 2400 lumen floodlight. It requires permanent power — no battery option here — and features IP65 weather resistance rating.

Unlike standard floodlights, which get triggered by any sort of motion, the Nest Cam with Floodlight can use the same intelligence available in the other cameras to only activate when it detects a person or vehicle. This separates it from other floodlight cameras, such as the Ring Floodlight Cam Wired Pro, which turns on and records a clip for any motion it detects.

Google says the Nest Cam with Floodlight will be available at a later date.

The simplest and least expensive new camera in the lineup is the $99.99 Nest Cam Indoor. A much smaller camera than the standard Nest Cam, the indoor model lacks the battery and weather sealing of the more expensive model, but maintains the same camera specs and intelligence features.

The Nest Cam Indoor will be available in four colors (white, pink, beige, or green) to better match your decor or other Nest products you might have in your home. There’s also an optional wooden base available for it and the camera can be placed on a table or mounted on a wall.

The Nest Cam Indoor is expected to be available at a later date.

The $179.99 Google Nest Doorbell is the first video doorbell from the company to work on either battery or wired power. (The $229.99 Nest Hello doorbell from 2018 was limited to wired-only configurations.) It’s compatible with more homes than Nest’s earlier doorbell and comes in four colors (white, beige, green, or gray) to better match your entrance decor. Google says typical battery life is about two and a half months between charges, though that is impacted by how busy your doorway is and the environment.

The Nest Doorbell has a 3:4 tall aspect ratio, similar to the old Nest Hello, which Google says allows you to see visitors head to toe and packages that are as close as eight inches from the door. The vertical field of view reaches 145 degrees, though it’s not clear how wide the horizontal field of view is. (A mounting wedge is included in the box to adjust its viewing angle for different entrances.) The Nest Doorbell can record 960 x 1280 pixel video at up to 30 frames per second and has both night vision and HDR capabilities.

Like the new Nest Cam, the Nest Doorbell includes up to three hours of event video history out of the box, but you can subscribe to a paid plan for longer storage (you can’t get 24/7 video history on the Doorbell, however). One of the biggest benefits for the original Nest Hello was how quickly it provided notifications or a live feed on a Nest Hub smart display after the bell was rung compared to other video doorbells — we’ll have to see if the Nest Doorbell maintains that performance when running on battery power.

The Nest Doorbell can be preordered starting today, August 5th, with shipments expected to begin on August 24th.

The new cameras fill some obvious gaps in Google’s smart home lineup and make it more competitive with Ring and others that have had floodlight cameras and battery-powered doorbells for years now. The lower prices also make the cameras more accessible than before, though they aren’t nearly as affordable as the cameras available from Wyze and other smaller brands.

But if you’ve got a smart home that centers around the Google Assistant, cheaper budget cameras or Ring products won’t work as well for you and you certainly won’t have as cohesive of an experience as you’d get with Google’s own devices. We’ll see just how good that experience is when we get a chance to review the new cameras in the near future.

You can currently see 24/7 history on the more expensive Nest Aware subscription with the Nest Hello. This reads like it’s being removed for the new version of the nest doorbell. If so, I wonder why?

By m_Pach3co on 08.05.21 9:34am

That would be odd, but I have the event based plan and my door bell and it is so sensitive it typically records everything or even minor interest anyway.

By CoryDS on 08.05.21 11:32am

Also, why even keep the old Nest Hello doorbell in the lineup? It’s older, dumber, and more expensive, whereas this seems like this is an upgrade in every way. It’s unclear whether there are any downgrades, so I’m confused.

By mr_k on 08.05.21 11:45am

So their compare page helps clarify things. No 24/7 video history even when wired in, which doesn’t make sense. Why limit that?

By mr_k on 08.05.21 12:21pm

Because the new one is battery powered.

By dsignori on 08.05.21 11:48am

It’s probably disabled in battery mode but something you can enable if you hardwire it in.

By RyanHakurei on 08.05.21 1:07pm

Hmm, so a downgrade from IQ cams if you’re not interested in battery mode applications? While I understand a product refresh at a lower price point with fewer features, why get rid of your 4K cameras entirely? Leave them in the lineup….

By theNEOone on 08.05.21 10:00am

The ring battery doorbells have higher video resolution. Also it seems that the ring doorbell can be used more like a security camera as well while the nest doorbell (new one) would need another camera to monitor that part of the house. I have an attached condo and the ring doorbell can cover the whole front of my condo and I only need that. If I were to switch to the new nest doorbell I would need another camera.

By majortom1981 on 08.05.21 10:01am

If it works like the current Hello doorbell with event recording it’s a very capable security camera. It’s very sensitive to record, any motion at all such as wind through the grass will trigger a 5 minute clip. Those end up turning into just continuous recording.

By CoryDS on 08.05.21 11:47am

No thanks. For the price, Google products are worse than cheaper alternatives without subscription like Eufy. I had two car thefts walk by Nest 4K cameras 5 feet away and the picture was totally useless. Google employees dont test their products in real life. I purged my home from all Google devices. Much better.

By ThePodhalan on 08.05.21 10:28am

Yeah, but Eufy security is … questionable at best. Reported right here on the Verge.

By erikdonkey on 08.05.21 10:31am

With any luck they’ll make the familiar faces feature useful so that it stops notifying you that you entered your own house. As of now it’s absolutely useless.

By morganphoto42 on 08.05.21 10:29am

‘XXXXX just picked up a package.’

No shit, sherlock. I know, because that was me.

By theNEOone on 08.05.21 10:45am

I’ve always appreciated that the Nest products actually look like something I’d want in my home. A lot of other companies door bells and cameras stick out like a sore thumb.

By Christopher Givens on 08.05.21 10:52am

Yeah – if only they weren’t Google. I’m waiting for some attractive options to show up for Apple HomeKit – I just don’t trust Google with my data anymore (not that I ever should have).

By ScotticusFinch on 08.05.21 10:55am

Yeah that’s a fair point. I trust all of these companies about as far as I can throw em. I just very specifically do not want a Ring camera. I don’t like how cozy Amazon has gotten with law enforcement and sharing footage.

By Christopher Givens on 08.05.21 11:29am

I wonder with Matter it will all become mute. These camera’s might just work with it and therefore Homekit.

By MorbidGod on 08.05.21 12:35pm

I’ve been a HomeKit enthusiast for years now, but I’ve got to say I’m starting to consider leaving. Google’s Home/Nest ecosystem just feels more thought out and intentional, and my Nest devices are rock solid. I have a Circle View with HomeKit Secure Video and that thing straight up sucks compared to the Nest Cams. Plus Home has always felt like an afterthought at Apple. I’m waiting for Matter later this year before I do more, but I’ve got to say Google might be doing it better.

By mr_k on 08.05.21 11:56am

I think that’s the trade off. I’ve always thought Google’s UX for smart home is better than the competition, but it’s the data monolith in your home.

By Christopher Givens on 08.05.21 3:47pm

If you think Apple is any friendlier with your data you’re sorely mistaken. (That’s three separate links btw)

By RyanHakurei on 08.05.21 1:10pm

As someone who is moving in October and is already firmly in the Google ecosystem for smart home tech, this is great. I’ve been holding out on getting google security cams due to the price point but these new offerings are pretty affordable for what you get out of it.

By SyFyFan on 08.05.21 11:53am

I researched all the door bells and was taken aggressively aback by the nest pricing. Amazon offers products with similar resolution for $100(!!!) less than this cheaper model. Yikes.

By AgloeDreams on 08.05.21 12:55pm

I really wish Google would clarify if these will support Matter, and therefore HomeKit… but I guess it’s not a good idea to buy tech with the promise of future support anyway.

By Jason Stoff on 08.05.21 1:07pm

Matter doesn’t support video so what would there be to support?

By Pixel4Ever on 08.05.21 1:49pm

Didn’t know that — disappointing, but thanks for the info!

By Jason Stoff on 08.05.21 4:11pm

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