New PlayStation Plus Free Games for September Now Available

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ComicBook.com 07 September, 2021 - 11:07am 14 views

What are the PS Plus games for September 2021?

PlayStation Plus subscribers will get free access to three games in September: IO Interactive's Hitman 2 and IllFonic's Predator: Hunting Grounds for PlayStation 4, and Ghost Town Games' Overcooked! All You Can Eat for PlayStation 5. PolygonPlayStation Plus September 2021 free games announced

The latest batch of PlayStation Plus free games is now available as the September 2021 offerings have rotated in for the subscription service. More specifically, the new PlayStation Plus titles available for the month are Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, Hitman 2, and Predator: Hunting Grounds. The first of those, Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, is for the PlayStation 5 while both Hitman 2 and Predator: Hunting Grounds are for PlayStation 4. They are available as of now and will be through October 4th.

The usual caveats for free PlayStation Plus video games all apply to the new titles. They are only available to claim for a limited time, and even then only by current PlayStation Plus subscribers. They are for the specific platforms listed, though most PS4 titles can be played via backwards compatibility on the PS5. Subscribers that let their subscription lapse will lose access to any of the previously claimed PlayStation Plus titles, but should they resubscribe in the future, they will regain the ability to access them. PlayStation Plus titles claimed in this essentially remain a part of any subscriber's library indefinitely regardless of their subscription status.

As noted above, September 2021's free PlayStation Plus titles, Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, Hitman 2, and Predator: Hunting Grounds, are now available and will be so through October 4th. Also as noted, the former is for PS5 while the latter two are for PS4. At this point, it remains unclear what PlayStation might offer for PlayStation Plus in October 2021, but it might be worth noting that both FIFA 22 and Super Monkey Ball Banana Mania release early enough in the month that one of them could potentially be part of it. You can check out all of our previous coverage of the PlayStation Plus subscription service right here.

What do you think about September 2021's free PlayStation Plus video games? Are you happy about the current way in which PlayStation Plus operates? Let us know in the comments, or feel free to reach out and hit me up directly over on Twitter at @rollinbishop to talk about all things gaming!

Copyright 2021 ComicBook.com. All rights reserved.

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I'm Not Convinced Sony Is "For The Players" Anymore

Attack of the Fanboy 07 September, 2021 - 01:00pm

Last week, it became clear that there wouldn’t be a free avenue to upgrade Horizon Forbidden West if you began your journey on PS4, with consumers being required to purchase a more expensive version of the game or simply go without. The messaging was mixed, hubristic, and failed to acknowledge the attitude around free upgrades that have emerged in recent months. Given the shortage of components and unprecedented demand, purchasing a PS5 right now is tremendously difficult, and thus a large number of people will likely pick up Forbidden West on older hardware. Knowing they’ll need to fork out an upgrade fee or pay full price for the privilege is a huge bummer, and while you could argue there’s an aura of entitlement here, I think Sony’s capitalist expectations far outweigh any concerns I have. Now the decision has been reversed, so free upgrades for everyone!

This isn’t the first time Sony has pulled such a trick, with Ghost of Tsushima also presenting a complicated upgrade path that made it impossible to score a free upgrade if you owned the game already. You had to pay for the director’s cut, as many of its visual and mechanical enhancements were directly baked into the new experience, with Iki Island being seemingly inextricable from the new version. Once again, it felt like thinly veiled excuses - even more so when you consider that save files could be carried over in a matter of seconds if you did pay for the upgrade. Death Stranding: Director’s Cut also isn’t offering a free solution for existing owners, instead expecting an upgrade fee much like Ghost of Tsushima before it. Sony wants some extra pennies for its efforts, and that’s understandable, but I’d rather it be completely honest with the state of things instead of hurling out mixed messaging each and every time it has a cross-generation title on its hands.

Final Fantasy 7 Remake offered a free upgrade and charged for the PS5-exclusive expansion, which to me feels like the perfect compromise. I already own the base game, so I should be entitled to the same experience on a better console. Episode Intermission is all new, so paying £10-15 to gain access to it feels completely fair. That is, unless you renewed FF7 Remake through PS Plus, since Sony made sure this version of the game wasn’t valid for a digital upgrade. Once again, this needlessly muddies the waters on how upgrades work and what exactly we as consumers are entitled to. Microsoft has avoided this territory entirely thanks to Xbox Play Anywhere. If you buy a game once, you have access to it everywhere, no questions asked. It’s a one-time purchase, and you don’t need to worry about logistics when hopping between platforms. This is the perfect way forward, but given the ever changing ideologies of Sony and Microsoft, I doubt we’ll ever settle on a middle ground.

Jade King is one of the Features Editors for TheGamer. Previously Gaming Editor over at Trusted Reviews, she can be found talking about games, anime and retweeting Catradora fanart @KonaYMA6.

Free PS Plus Games for September 2021 Are Available to Download Now

GameRant 07 September, 2021 - 11:44am

From now until October 4, PS Plus subscribers can claim Overcooked: All You Can Eat on PlayStation 5, as well as Hitman 2 and Predator: Hunting Grounds on PlayStation 4. While Overcooked: All You Can Eat is only available to PS Plus subscribers with a PS5, both Hitman 2 and Predator: Hunting Grounds are technically playable on Sony's next-generation console as well thanks to its backward compatibility with PS4 titles.

The reaction to the free PS Plus games for September 2021 seems to be more positive than the reaction to the free PS Plus games for August 2021. As some may recall, the free PS Plus games lineup for August 2021 included battle royale game Hunter's Arena: Legends, Plants vs. Zombies: Battle for Neighborville, and Tennis World Tour 2.

Hitman 2, meanwhile, is one of IO Interactive's stealth-action games, and is a great way for fans to prepare for Hitman 3 if they have yet to try that particular game out. Predator: Hunting Grounds is an asymmetric multiplayer game where one player takes on the role of the titular Predator as they hunt human players.

As for the next batch of free PS Plus games, subscribers can expect them to be announced on the last Wednesday of the month, which is September 29. However, it's possible that the upcoming PlayStation Showcase event will include a PS Plus announcement, as Sony has been known to use these presentations to announce free PS Plus titles ahead of time.

Dalton Cooper is an editor for Game Rant who has been writing about video games professionally since 2011. Having written thousands of game reviews and articles over the course of his career, Dalton considers himself a video game historian and strives to play as many games as possible. Dalton covers the latest breaking news for Game Rant, as well as writes reviews, guide content, and more.

New PlayStation Plus Free Games for September Now Available

TechSpot 07 September, 2021 - 11:07am

The latest batch of PlayStation Plus free games is now available as the September 2021 offerings have rotated in for the subscription service. More specifically, the new PlayStation Plus titles available for the month are Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, Hitman 2, and Predator: Hunting Grounds. The first of those, Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, is for the PlayStation 5 while both Hitman 2 and Predator: Hunting Grounds are for PlayStation 4. They are available as of now and will be through October 4th.

The usual caveats for free PlayStation Plus video games all apply to the new titles. They are only available to claim for a limited time, and even then only by current PlayStation Plus subscribers. They are for the specific platforms listed, though most PS4 titles can be played via backwards compatibility on the PS5. Subscribers that let their subscription lapse will lose access to any of the previously claimed PlayStation Plus titles, but should they resubscribe in the future, they will regain the ability to access them. PlayStation Plus titles claimed in this essentially remain a part of any subscriber's library indefinitely regardless of their subscription status.

As noted above, September 2021's free PlayStation Plus titles, Overcooked: All You Can Eat!, Hitman 2, and Predator: Hunting Grounds, are now available and will be so through October 4th. Also as noted, the former is for PS5 while the latter two are for PS4. At this point, it remains unclear what PlayStation might offer for PlayStation Plus in October 2021, but it might be worth noting that both FIFA 22 and Super Monkey Ball Banana Mania release early enough in the month that one of them could potentially be part of it. You can check out all of our previous coverage of the PlayStation Plus subscription service right here.

What do you think about September 2021's free PlayStation Plus video games? Are you happy about the current way in which PlayStation Plus operates? Let us know in the comments, or feel free to reach out and hit me up directly over on Twitter at @rollinbishop to talk about all things gaming!

Copyright 2021 ComicBook.com. All rights reserved.

Call of Duty Season 5 Reloaded launch time, Operators, and Warzone updates

Niche Gamer 07 September, 2021 - 11:04am

The new midseason update is light on content, but still has something to look forward to.

Call of Duty Season 5 Reloaded is on the horizon and serves as the midseason update featuring new modes, a weapon, Operators, and a limited-time event. Since this is a midseason update, you shouldn’t expect massive content drop, but there are still some things to be excited about.

Below, we’ll cover everything you’ll need to know about Warzone Season 5 Reloaded, including its start time, and what to expect from it.

The Warzone Season 5 Reloaded update will go live on September 8 at 9 p.m. Pacific, September 9 at midnight Eastern. Depending on your platform, expect to reserve around 9-10GB of room for the Season 5 Reloaded update.

Sadly, there isn’t a Season 5 Reloaded trailer just yet, and it’s unclear if one will be released at all since this is a midseason update. Typically, trailers are reserved for major updates and events.

Black Ops Cold War and Warzone share progression systems, and since both are linked, each game will receive content as part of Season 5 Reloaded. However, we’ll only be covering the new Warzone content here.

For Warzone, Season 5 Reloaded will come with a handful of new features, including new Operators, modes, and a limited-time mode. Here are the most noteworthy inclusions:

Most notably, the Warzone Season 5 Reloaded update comes with a batch of new modes, such as Clash and Iron Trials ‘84. Clash is a deathmatch mode that pits teams of 50v50 against one another at select areas of Verdansk. The first to reach 500 points wins, though you don’t need to secure eliminations to score. Contracts also earn you points, giving lower-skill players an opportunity to contribute.

Aside from that, the Iron Trials ‘84 mode is a new take on the battle royale formula. This mode is for the most skilled players, as it will be even more difficult to come out on top. Base health is increased in this mode, along with a change to health regeneration (though it’s unspecified how it will be changed). Iron Trials will not feature any free loadout drops, meaning you must purchase them throughout the map (at a higher price). There will also be environmental changes, along with a more barebones version of the Gulag in this mode.

As for “The Numbers” limited-time event, not much is known about it, but we do know players will need to visit mobile broadcast stations to activate them and earn rewards. Based on its description, it doesn’t seem to be anything too substantial, unfortunately. This is set to begin on September 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern.

Players will also gain access to the new Sai melee weapon, which likely won’t make much of a splash to the game’s meta. In addition to the new Hudson Operator, you’ll be able to purchase the new Judge Dredd bundle, which features an Operator skin, weapon blueprint, charm, finishing move, and calling card. Look forward to this bundle when it launches later on in the season.

Why Don't the Horizon Forbidden West Collector’s Editions Come with a Physical Disc?

TechRaptor 07 September, 2021 - 11:00am

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By: Dan Rockwood

Those looking forward to the Horizon Forbidden West release date don’t have too much longer to wait for the Horizon Zero Dawn sequel, and Sony continues to fan the hype with the latest look at the different editions that are available. Those hoping to pick up a Forbidden West Collector’s or Forbidden West Regalla Edition, however, have noticed something missing from these pricey packages: a physical disc. Instead of tangible media, buyers will receive a steelbook display case that will sit empty, with a digital download for both the PS4 and PS5 versions of Horizon: Forbidden West. Though this isn’t the first instance of a collector’s edition of a game being released without a physical copy, fans have been quick to voice their discontent and question the decision.

In a recent PlayStation Blog post, Sony breaks down what players can expect to receive with each edition of Horizon Forbidden West. Collectors will likely be most interested in the Horizon Forbidden West Collector’s Edition or the Horizon Forbidden West Regalla Edition. The Collector’s Edition comes with digital download codes for the PS4 and PS5 versions, a steelbook display case, a Tremortusk and Aloy statue, as well as in-game rewards, a digital soundtrack, canvas map, and other perks. If you choose to buy the Regalla Edition, you’ll receive many of the above items plus a few other exclusive rewards, such as a Regalla Tremortusk statue in place of the original that’s available in the Collector’s Edition.

So all of this, and no game disc. Fans were quick to point out their displeasure with this decision, and it’s fair to understand that those looking to buy a collector’s edition of a game would want to, you know, have a disc they could collect.

There’s also a bit of a time disadvantage with those looking to play the game the moment it’s available at midnight in their time zone. If you preorder and download Horizon Forbidden West digitally, it’ll be available the moment the game goes live. But where these digital vouchers are being dispersed in the respective collector’s edition boxes, you won’t be able to actually redeem the codes and install the game until it’s in your hands. It’s possible some retail centers may offer midnight releases, but you still need to factor in travel time, installation time, and downloading any day-one patches. It’s safe to assume those willing to shell out the money for a collection like this would want to be among the first to play Horizon Forbidden West, and though Forbidden West release date pickup will be available, it is alienating those looking to pull an all-nighter to get Aloy as far into the campaign as they can. For this reason, I wouldn’t be surprised if this most eager fans would skip out on the Collector’s and Regalla editions all together.

The answer to this question likely lies within the convoluted world of cross-gen titles. Fact: Those who purchase Horizon Forbidden West on PS4 will be able to upgrade to the PS5 version for free (though future cross-gen titles, such as the upcoming God of War sequel, will require a $10 upgrade fee to unlock the PS5 version). This is true regardless of if you buy Forbidden West physically or secure a download code. For the Digital Deluxe, Collector’s, and Regalla editions, players will receive a digital code for both the PS4 and PS5 versions, and each person can download whichever version is relevant for their console.

To offer this PS4/PS5 combo with a physical disc, Sony would need to ship two separate physical copies of the game in a single box, driving up production costs. This situation becomes more complicated given the number of PlayStation 5 digital-only consoles that have been sold. By offering download codes, Guerrilla and Sony are able to ensure that anyone who wants to buy a premium edition of the game and also play that game will be able to. As consoles shift to a more digital future through this decade and beyond, it’s a trend that we are inevitably going to be seeing more and more of.

At the end of the day, I’m not the one who should tell you which version to buy, all I can say is that you should feel satisfied with your purchase because it’s your hard-earned money. The Horizon Forbidden West Collector’s and Regalla editions come with some really cool perks that are locked behind a premium price. Owning these collections doesn’t make anyone more or less of a fan than someone who only wants (or who can only afford) to buy the base game. At the end of the day, it’s the way the story and characters resonate with you that matters, and not how much stuff is on your shelf.

If you love the game and want a physical copy, you can rest assured your game retailer of choice will have it available on launch day. Prefer to preorder the Horizon Forbidden West Digital Deluxe Edition and play it the moment it’s available? That’s likely the route I’ll be taking. Still sold on the Collector’s and Regalla editions but wish they came with a physical disc? Honestly, my recommendation is buy the collector’s edition you want now, enjoy the digital copy, and pick up a severely discounted disc two or three years from now. I can’t predict the future of PS5 game values, but given many first-party PS4 titles eventually went on sale for $10 new, I expect similar price drops as we move further into the PS5 lifecycle.

The Horizon: Forbidden West release date is Feb. 18, 2022. Will you be securing a Forbidden West preorder ahead of time, or waiting for the price to drop a bit before committing? Let us know in the comments!

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Andrew Stretch

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

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By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Robert N. Adams

By: Andrew Stretch

By: Robert N. Adams

I'm a New England-based writer who loves games and the industry at large. My favorite video game is Majora's Mask, and I will always says yes to looking at cat photos. I play all games but spend most of my time on Switch and PS4/PS5, with favorite genres being action adventure. 

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Sony’s Decisions Surrounding The PS5 Need To Be Discussed

Forbes 07 September, 2021 - 09:25am

This past week, Sony baffled fans and critics alike by announcing that Horizon Forbidden West would not have a dedicated upgrade path from the PS4 to the PS5 version of the game. Not a free option, not a paid option, just an expensive Deluxe Edition you needed to buy that contained “dual entitlement” to both versions.

Past that, this was contrary to what they explicitly said a year ago, that Horizon would be one of a few other games like Miles Morales to receive a free PS5 upgrade.

Past that, this feeds into a larger discussion about the fact that even if done “correctly,” Sony is asking for $10 to upgrade games to the now higher $70 PS5 price going forward.

They had to reverse course and offer a free upgrade in the end, but generally speaking, this seems to sum up a dual narrative about this console generation. On one side, you have many consumers saying that Sony keeps stumbling into messes of its own making, and that some aspects of the PS5 are lacking compared to both the upgrades they thought it would have over the PS4, and what its competition, Microsoft, is doing with Xbox this generation.

Then on the other, you have those who are saying that Sony is getting too hard a time, it still makes great games and the PS5 is a great console and everyone is simply hating for its own sake, myself included.

I know that I’ve come across like this during this generation. Hell, I’m sure Sony itself has seen my articles and thought that. But what I want to do today is get into a longer, hopefully reasonable article about what aspects of the PS5, and Sony’s decisions surrounding it, have bothered me this generation, and why things just feel…off compared to PS4.

To me, I am getting similar vibes to the PS3 era of Sony, where coming off the massive success of the PS2, Sony felt entitled to get away with certain things that really didn’t fly. The most obvious example of that was the exceptionally steep $600 price point of the PS3 at launch, one of the worst pricing decisions in gaming console history, and one that had to be quickly remedied.

Price is not a PS5 problem. The $400-$500 disc and digital models are priced just fine, and the $100 disparity for digital players, coming in below the Xbox Series X, is an advantage for the system. That’s very much true.

But my experience with Sony’s PS5 decisions has often felt like death by a thousand cuts, a load of little microannoyances that have added up over time, but also integrated with larger, structural problems that have made Xbox look better by comparison. And that’s absolutely something you could not have said about the launch of the PS4 versus the Xbox One, where the opposite was true.

I am not an Xbox fanboy. I played my PS4 probably five times as much as my Xbox One when all was said and done last generation. I am still playing my PS5 more than my Xbox Series X to this day. Yes, that’s because my main game is Destiny 2, and that was my platform of choice for it, but crossplay now exists, and I’m still sticking with PlayStation. I play Avengers and Genshin Impact there. I consider Ratchet and Clank a potential GOTY contender, and I know that many feel similarly about Returnal.

Patch Copying – It remains stunning to me that a full generation went by, PS5 focused extensively on promoting its hyper-fast SSD, and we still have to copy patches after downloading them on the system. Yes, it’s faster than it used to be, and yet Sony had an entire generation to figure out a way to patch games that didn’t involve this process, but it decided to leave it in place.

UI Design – Without question, the UI of the PS5 is a downgrade from the PS4. You have to forget years of muscle memory to re-learn a simple action like shutting down the system, now with more button presses. But outside of the new menus, I do not especially enjoy being greeted with a giant, full-page advertisement I cannot remove every time I turn on my console, as that’s the new home page of the system in this generation.

Save Transfer And Generational Upgrades – I will admit that I mocked the concept of Xbox Smart Delivery when they first announced it, as I didn’t understand why you would need to name the obviously simple process of going from one generation of a game to another. Then I tried to do it on PlayStation. First, there’s the cost, which usually involves either a $10 upgrade fee Microsoft does not have, or the utter nonsense we just endured with the Horizon Deluxe Edition before Sony went back on that. But then there’s the fact that PS5 has a convoluted process of having two separate versions of the game listed in your library and in stores, and only recently have they streamlined their save transfer process.

That has not helped me, however. Both times I have tried to port my saves across generations, I ran into trouble. For whatever reason, my auto-cloud saves were inactive on some games for some period of time on PS4. I still have not figured out why, perhaps a momentary lapse in PS Plus subscription, but it’s absurd that can even happen. So, to recover my Avengers save file I had to unpackage my PS4 I had already hidden away in my basement to transfer the save manually to the new system. Then, when I tried to play Ghost of Tsushima’s new expansion, I found my old save file was just…gone. Again, it wasn’t in the cloud, and a year later, I’ve sold my old PS4 and it’s vanished forever. Is this “my fault”? I mean, you can spin it that way, and yet all I know is that I would not have had this issue on Xbox due to Smart Delivery. The process, on every level, has been a nightmare in my experience.

The $70 Price Point – This is a broader question about the health of the industry and the future of game delivery. It just seems like such a strange move that in a generation that has Microsoft extolling the virtues of day one copies of all its first party games on Game Pass, xCloud and PC, that Sony has decided to champion the first major price hike in eons in the gaming industry. I am sympathetic to the idea that no, not every company is Microsoft and can do something as risky as launch every major AAA game “for free” on a subscription service, but Sony has done little to even attempt to compete with Game Pass, and the $70 price point feels like a poorly timed move at the dawn of this generation. While you can make the case about certain high quality Sony games, Horizon, God of War, being “worth” $70, I do think this has the potential to hurt other games. Returnal, for instance, seems like a much tougher sell at $70, and Housemarque didn’t even know the game would be priced that high until it launched. Hell, even a game like Godfall launched at $70, and this is where the quality argument kind of falls apart for me. Sony just seems to be pulling in the opposite direction of the way the industry is moving.

In the end, I don’t think the issue is black and white. Sony has still done many, many things well this generation, including its continued production of must-have exclusives that have seen no drop in quality. My PS5’s performance is great, I love the DualSense, and on the other side of the fence, Microsoft isn’t perfect. Fans had to shame them into reverting an absurd Xbox Live price hike, and the fate of its first party roster remains unknown as a game like Halo Infinite constantly seems like it’s teetering on the brink between potential megahit or potential disaster. They still have a lot to prove.

But something is…off about Sony this generation. The PS5 was a power upgrade over its predecessor, but did not change as much as it could, and made some things actively worse. Sony constantly looks like it’s stuck in the past compared to the paths Microsoft is taking going forward, whether we’re talking Smart Delivery or these sky-high game prices versus Game Pass. I hope this Horizon moment, which blends about 3-4 of these problems together into a single controversy, is enough to get them to rethink where the PS5 is heading this generation. But with sales the way they are, I suppose there’s no real motivation to change, and this just may be the way PlayStation works now.

I’ve been writing about video games, television and movies for Forbes for over 10 years, and you may have seen my reviews on Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic. I cover all

I’ve been writing about video games, television and movies for Forbes for over 10 years, and you may have seen my reviews on Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic. I cover all manner of console and PC games, but if it’s about looting or shooting, I’m definitely there. If I’m watching something, it’s usually science fiction, horror or superheroic. I’m also a regular on IGN’s Fireteam Chat podcast and have published five sci-fi novels.

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