New study finds drinking too much coffee can shrink your brain, increase dementia risk significantly | TheHill

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The Hill 23 July, 2021 - 11:10am 55 views

But having way too much of the morning pick-me-up could have an adverse effect on brain health over time, according to a new study led by the University of South Australia. 

They found that participants who consumed more than six cups of coffee each day had a 53-percent increased risk of dementia and smaller total brain volumes compared with those who consumed one to two cups a day. 

It’s worth noting that researchers have long debated the health effects of coffee, as nutritional research can be incredibly complicated. 

Previous studies have found drinking three to five cups of coffee per day may help protect against Alzheimer’s disease. 

Read full article at The Hill

Drinking more than 6 coffees a day may increase your risk of huge health issues

The Mirror 23 July, 2021 - 02:02pm

Drinking more than six cups of coffee a day could leave people at greater risk of dementia and stroke, scientists warn.

A study of 17,702 people between 37-73 showed those who drank this amount had smaller brain mass volumes and a 53% higher risk of dementia.

But the findings also suggested one or two cups a day was better for brain health than none at all.

Lead researcher, Kitty Pham, of the University of South Australia, said: “This is the most extensive investigation into the connections between coffee, brain volume measurements, the risks of dementia, and the risks of stroke.

“It’s also the largest study to consider volumetric brain imaging data and a wide range of confounding factors.

“Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume.

“Essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.”

Coffee is the most popular drink worldwide with around two billion cups consumed per day.

Brits drink 95 million cups every day.

Experts believe moderate coffee consumption can cut the risk of some diseases due to the chemical compounds found in it.

Too much could over-stimulate the heart and brain functions as well as lead to dehydration

The study cannot prove it is the coffee that is causing the increased dementia risk but did attempt to control for other factors such as age and other health problems.

Co-author Prof Elina Hypponen said: “As with many things in life, moderation is the key.

“Together with other genetic evidence and a randomised controlled trial, these data strongly suggest that high coffee consumption can adversely affect brain health.

“While the exact mechanisms are not known, one simple thing we can do is to keep hydrated and remember to drink a bit of water alongside that cup of coffee.

“Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee. Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine.

The findings are published in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience.

High coffee consumption linked with increased risk of dementia

Daily Mail 23 July, 2021 - 08:41am

By Jonathan Chadwick For Mailonline

Coffee may be the perfect morning pick-me-up, but a new study suggests drinking it in excess can compromise our brain health over time. 

Researchers in Australia have found that high coffee consumption is associated with smaller total brain volumes and a 53 per cent increased risk of dementia.   

The experts offer no explanation for the surprising link, which follows multiple previous studies that found drinking coffee in moderation can actually stave off dementia.  

The new study also follows a wealth of prior evidence that drinking coffee does have other health benefits over time – as long as it's not consumed in excess.  

Although it was not specifically determined that excess coffee consumption caused dementia, the authors of this new study warn against high consumption of the black stuff, which they define as more than six cups a day. 

It's easy to knock back multiple coffees throughout the day without keeping track of how many we've had. Now, new research from the University of South Australia shows that too much could impact brain health over time

According to the US's federal dietary guidelines, three to five 8-ounce cups of coffee per day can be part of a healthy diet – but this guidance only refers to plain black coffee. 

An 8-ounce cup equates to around 240ml – just under half a pint – and is about the capacity of a small serving of coffee in the UK. 

The average cup of coffee contains about 90mg of caffeine, depending on the type of coffee and how it's made, according to the British Dietetic Association (BDA). 

'A double espresso, the typical base for many coffee shop coffees, will contain about 125mg and the more shots you have in your coffee means that you will get more caffeine,' the BDA says. 

Health organisations around the world suggest that most people can safely consume up to 300mg of caffeine a day. 

In addition, despite its benefits, research has shown that caffeine also can be dangerous if consumed in excess. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that, in general, children should avoid coffee and any beverages with caffeine in them. 

The American Heart Association also warns that popular coffee-based drinks such as lattes and macchiatos are often high in calories, added sugar and fat - which effectively overrides any benefits of the black stuff. 

The study, published in Nutritional Neuroscience, has been led by experts at the University of South Australia (UniSA), along with academics from other institutions including the University of Cambridge and the University of Exeter. 

'Coffee is among the most popular drinks in the world. Yet with global consumption being more than nine billion kilograms a year, it's critical that we understand any potential health implications,' said study author Kitty Pham at UniSA.

'This is the most extensive investigation into the connections between coffee, brain volume measurements, the risks of dementia, and the risks of stroke.

'It's also the largest study to consider volumetric brain imaging data and a wide range of confounding factors.

'Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume.

'Essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.'

According to the European Food Safety Authority, we should be drinking 400mg of coffee a day – about four to five cups – at the very most although the daily maximum is only 200mg for pregnant women. 

'Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee,' said study author Professor Elina Hyppönen. 

'Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine.

'However, if you're finding that your coffee consumption is heading up toward more than six cups a day, it's about time you rethink your next drink.' 

Study author Professor David Llewellyn from the University of Exeter added: 'Heavy coffee drinkers can reduce their risk of dementia by moderating how much they drink – for example by drinking tea instead which wasn’t linked to dementia risk in our study.' 

The experts assessed the effects of coffee on the brain among 17,702 UK Biobank participants, aged between 37 and 73.

Those who drank more than six cups of coffee a day had a 53 per cent increased risk of dementia compared with those who consumed one to two cups a day. 

About 50 million people are diagnosed with dementia worldwide, and in Australia, dementia is the second leading cause of death, with an estimated 250 people diagnosed each day.   

A stroke, meanwhile, is where the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, resulting in oxygen starvation, brain damage and loss of function. 

If your coffee consumption is heading up toward more than six cups a day, 'it's about time you rethink your next drink', the research suggests 

Drinking coffee may protect you against developing both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease  

Two compounds in caffeine prevent accumulation of a toxic protein, alpha-synuclein, that's associated with dementia with Lewy bodies.

Moderate coffee consumption can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's by up to 27 per cent 

Drinking between three and five cups a day could cut the chance of developing Alzheimer's disease by up to 20 per cent. 

Globally, one in four adults over the age of 25 will have a stroke in their lifetime. Data suggests that 13.7 million people will have a stroke this year with 5.5 million dying as a result.  

'This research provides vital insights about heavy coffee consumption and brain health, but as with many things in life, moderation is the key,' said Professor Hyppönen. 

'Together with other genetic evidence and a randomised controlled trial, these data strongly suggest that high coffee consumption can adversely affect brain health.

'While the exact mechanisms are not known, one simple thing we can do is to keep hydrated and remember to drink a bit of water alongside that cup of coffee.' 

Earlier this year, Swiss researchers found regular caffeine intake reduces the volume of grey matter in the brain, suggesting coffee intake could impair our information processing ability.

The experts gave volunteers three 150mg servings of caffeine a day for 10 days – a caffeine intake equating to about four or five small cups of brewed coffee a day, or seven single espressos.  

They found a reduction in grey matter, which is mostly found on the outer-most layer of the brain, or cortex, and serves to process information. 

UniSA has been consistently investigating the effects of coffee – one of Australia's favourite beverages – on human health. 

In February, the team revealed that long-term, heavy coffee consumption – six or more cups a day – can increase the amount of fats in your blood, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)

'There's certainly a lot of scientific debate about the pros and cons of coffee,' said  Professor Hyppönen at the time.

'But while it may seem like we're going over old ground, it's essential to fully understand how one of the world's most widely consumed drinks can impact our health.'

Professor Hyppönen and her colleague Ang Zhou looked at genetic and phenotypic associations between coffee intake and plasma lipid profiles – the cholesterols and fats in blood.

The study, published in Clinical Nutrition, used data from 362,571 UK Biobank participants, aged between 37 and 73 years. 

Not only did they find a link between the two, but causal evidence that habitual coffee consumption contributes to an adverse lipid (fat) profile.

Coffee beans contain a very potent cholesterol-elevating compound called cafestol, which mainly present in unfiltered brews, such as French press, Turkish and Greek coffees, but also in espressos.

Espressos are the base for most barista-made coffees, including lattes and cappuccinos. If you order a coffee on the high street, you're likely to be served an espresso, whether it's with or without milk.

It's therefore wise to choose filtered coffee when possible and be wary of overindulging in the drink, even if it powers us through the working day.  

3D illustration of a caffeine molecule. Caffeine consumption during pregnancy has been an ongoing topic of debate

Just one daily cup of coffee during pregnancy may raise the risk of stillbirth, research published in 2020 suggests.

The British study of more than 1,000 pregnant women, including 290 who had a stillbirth, looked at daily caffeine intake.

Every 100mg of caffeine per day during pregnancy – the equivalent of one mug of filter coffee – was linked to a 27 per cent higher risk of a stillbirth.

Caffeine is believed to constrict the blood vessels of the placenta, which can reduce the oxygen reaching an unborn baby.

Babies in the womb clear caffeine about a third as fast as their mothers, and it can result in an irregular heartbeat.

Professor Alexander Heazell, first author of the study and Director of Tommy's Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre at Manchester University, said: 'This is a relatively small risk, so people shouldn't be worried about the occasional cup of coffee.

'But our study has found even a fairly small amount of daily caffeine is linked to a greater risk of stillbirth.'  

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Too much coffee can cause your brain to shrink, raise risk of dementia by 53 percent

Study Finds 23 July, 2021 - 08:11am

Drinking six or more cups a day was linked with a 53 percent increased risk of dementia and make stroke more likely, too. Brain imaging reveals that drinking a lot of coffee was also associated with brain shrinkage, say scientists.

The study, conducted at the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, is the largest of its kind based on 17,702 participants aged 30 to 37. Kitty Pham, a PhD candidate at the University of South Australia, who led the team of international researchers, says the findings draw attention to the risk of over-consuming.

“Coffee is among the most popular drinks in the world. Yet with global consumption being more than nine billion kilograms a year, it’s critical that we understand any potential health implications,” she explains in a statement. “This is the most extensive investigation into the connections between coffee, brain volume measurements, the risks of dementia, and the risks of stroke – it’s also the largest study to consider volumetric brain imaging data and a wide range of confounding factors.

“Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume,” she continues. “Essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.”

Dementia is a degenerative brain condition that affects memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform everyday tasks. About 50 million people are diagnosed with the condition worldwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 5 million senior Americans suffer from dementia. That figure is expected to balloon to 14 million by 2060, the agency predicts.

“This research provides vital insights about heavy coffee consumption and brain health, but as with many things in life, moderation is the key,” says senior investigator Elina Hyppönen, director of Australian Centre for Precision Health. “Together with other genetic evidence and a randomized controlled trial, these data strongly suggest that high coffee consumption can adversely affect brain health. While the exact mechanisms are not known, one simple thing we can do is to keep hydrated and remember to drink a bit of water alongside that cup of coffee.

“Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee. Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine,” she adds. “However, if you’re finding that your coffee consumption is heading up toward more than six cups a day, it’s about time you rethink your next drink.”

The findings are published in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience.

Six cups of coffee a day is enough to start damaging your brain

ZME Science 23 July, 2021 - 03:35am

A coffee each morning can work as a quick pick-me-up. But don’t go overboard, researchers from the University of South Australia warn, as it could negatively impact your brain’s health.

One of the largest studies of its kind reports that high coffee consumption is associated with an increased risk of dementia and smaller total brain volumes. The study included data from 17,702 UK Biobank participants aged 37-73, finding that those who drank six or more cups of coffee per day had a 53% increased risk of dementia, and showed reduced volumes in their overall brains, white matter, gray matter, and their hippocampus.

“Coffee is among the most popular drinks in the world. Yet with global consumption being more than nine billion kilograms a year, it’s critical that we understand any potential health implications,” says Kitty Pham, lead researcher on the paper and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of South Australia (UniSA). “This is the most extensive investigation into the connections between coffee, brain volume measurements, the risks of dementia, and the risks of stroke—it’s also the largest study to consider volumetric brain imaging data and a wide range of confounding factors.

“Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume—essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.”

Although I personally know nobody who actually drinks six or more cups of coffee a day, there are certainly a few out there. As such, the findings could be quite important for public health, pointing to a source of preventable brain damage, including stroke and dementia.

Dementia affects about 50 million people worldwide, affecting an individual’s ability to think, their memory, impacting their behavior, and their ability to perform even everyday tasks. It’s a degenerative brain condition and a sizeable cause of death worldwide.

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Strokes involve the disruption of blood flow to the brain, usually through blood clots or the rupturing of blood vessels, and end up starving areas of the brain of oxygen. This, in turn, leads to (usually significant) brain damage and loss of function. They’re surprisingly common, affecting one in four adults over the age of 25 worldwide.

The team explains that the exact mechanism through which excessive caffeine can impact brain health is not yet known but these results — along with previous research on the topic — make a strong argument that it does have such an effect. Still, this doesn’t mean you have to put your cup down for good. Moderation is the name of the game, the team explains.

“This research provides vital insights about heavy coffee consumption and brain health, but as with many things in life, moderation is the key,” says Professor Elina Hyppönen, senior investigator and Director of UniSA’s Australian Centre for Precision Health.

“Together with other genetic evidence and a randomized controlled trial, these data strongly suggest that high coffee consumption can adversely affect brain health. While the exact mechanisms are not known, one simple thing we can do is to keep hydrated and remember to drink a bit of water alongside that cup of coffee.

People typically consume between one and two cups of coffee per day, the team adds, which is not a very accurate measure, as cups are quite variable. Still, such low levels of intake should be fine. As long as you’re not closing in on five of six cups a day, they conclude, you should be safe.

The paper “High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke” has been published in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience.

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© 2007-2019 ZME Science - Not exactly rocket science. All Rights Reserved.

Excessive Coffee Drinking Linked to Dementia

Futurism 22 July, 2021 - 03:08pm

After probing the medical records of 17,702 volunteers in the UK Biobank database, a team of scientists from the University of South Australia found a startling correlation between drinking lots of coffee — seven or more cups per day — and a 53 percent increase in their dementia risk.

And it’s not just dementia. The study, which the team published last month in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience, also shows a link between heavy coffee drinking and a greater prevalence of physical changes in the brain and other neurological diseases. All in all, it’s a shocking revelation about the dangerous side of what’s by far one of the most popular recreational drugs around the world.

“Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume,” lead study author and University of South Australia neuroscientist Kitty Pham said in a university press release. “Essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.”

Coffee is one of those things that, alongside wine and chocolate, seems to be stuck in a never-ending back and forth of research studies saying it’ll either improve or ruin your health. The fact is that nutritional research is extremely difficult, so different studies tend to point in different directions. But the sheer scale of this new study, coupled with the extremely high coffee intake it examined, grants it extra credibility.

The researchers say that they’re not yet sure why drinking so much coffee is correlated with an increased risk of stroke or dementia. But either way, they added that you probably don’t need to abstain from your daily pick-me-up.

“Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee,” senior study author Elina Hyppönen said in the release. “Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine. However, if you’re finding that your coffee consumption is heading up toward more than six cups a day, it’s about time you rethink your next drink.”

Excess coffee use shown to decrease brain volume, increase dementia risk

Medical Xpress 22 July, 2021 - 11:45am

by University of South Australia

Conducted at UniSA's Australian Centre for Precision Health at SAHMRI and a team of international researchers, the study assessed the effects of coffee on the brain among 17,702 UK Biobank participants (aged 37-73), finding that those who drank more than six cups of coffee a day had a 53 per cent increased risk of dementia.

Lead researcher and UniSA Ph.D. candidate, Kitty Pham, says the research delivers important insights for public health.

"Coffee is among the most popular drinks in the world. Yet with global consumption being more than nine billion kilograms a year, it's critical that we understand any potential health implications," Pham says.

"This is the most extensive investigation into the connections between coffee, brain volume measurements, the risks of dementia, and the risks of stroke—it's also the largest study to consider volumetric brain imaging data and a wide range of confounding factors.

"Accounting for all possible permutations, we consistently found that higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with reduced brain volume—essentially, drinking more than six cups of coffee a day may be putting you at risk of brain diseases such as dementia and stroke."

Dementia is a degenerative brain condition that affects memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform everyday tasks. About 50 million people are diagnosed with the syndrome worldwide. In Australia, dementia is the second leading cause of death, with an estimated 250 people diagnosed each day.

Stroke is a condition where the blood supply to the brain is disrupted, resulting in oxygen starvation, brain damage and loss of function. Globally, one in four adults over the age of 25 will have a stroke in their lifetime. Data suggests that 13.7 million people will have a stroke this year with 5.5 million dying as a result.

Senior investigator and Director of UniSA's Australian Centre for Precision Health, Professor Elina Hyppönen, says while the news may be a bitter brew for coffee lovers, it's all about finding a balance between what you drink and what's good for your health.

"This research provides vital insights about heavy coffee consumption and brain health, but as with many things in life, moderation is the key," Prof Hyppönen says.

"Together with other genetic evidence and a randomized controlled trial, these data strongly suggest that high coffee consumption can adversely affect brain health. While the exact mechanisms are not known, one simple thing we can do is to keep hydrated and remember to drink a bit of water alongside that cup of coffee.

"Typical daily coffee consumption is somewhere between one and two standard cups of coffee. Of course, while unit measures can vary, a couple of cups of coffee a day is generally fine.

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